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The Groucho Letters: Letters from and to Groucho Marx ePub download

by Groucho Marx

  • Author: Groucho Marx
  • ISBN: 030680607X
  • ISBN13: 978-0306806070
  • ePub: 1431 kb | FB2: 1397 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Performing Arts
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press (August 21, 1994)
  • Pages: 320
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 612
  • Format: docx lrf lit doc
The Groucho Letters: Letters from and to Groucho Marx ePub download

com these letters are good reading, for out of the book Groucho emerges, eyebrows bounding, eyes rolling, cigar jauntily clamped between his teeth, the wisecracks coming a mile.

com these letters are good reading, for out of the book Groucho emerges, eyebrows bounding, eyes rolling, cigar jauntily clamped between his teeth, the wisecracks coming a mile a minute. Even Calvin Coolidge might have smiled.

The Groucho Letters book. This classic collection of Groucho Marx's correspondence, which was donated to the Library of Congress, at their request, gives the best glimpse into who Groucho Marx was. Not only do we see his letters to his family and friends, who included some of the century's most famous people, but we get to see what people wrote in return. Groucho's personality and wit shine through, and these letters are a rare treasure.

Julius Henry Marx (2 October 1890 – 19 August 1977), primarily known as Groucho Marx, was an American comedian and actor, famous for his work in the Marx Brothers comedy team, and his solo film and television career

Julius Henry Marx (2 October 1890 – 19 August 1977), primarily known as Groucho Marx, was an American comedian and actor, famous for his work in the Marx Brothers comedy team, and his solo film and television career. A likely story - and probably true. The Al Jolson Show repartee following a trite, scripted Al Jolson joke. Although it is generally known, I think it's about time to announce that I was born at a very early age. From his autobiography Groucho and Me (1959).

Описание: Groucho Marx& elder daughter saved virtually every letter her father wrote to her between 1938, when she was 11 years old, and 1967, and she presents them in this book with notes and photographs from her own collection. 14" wide x 15 1⁄2" tall x 5" gusset, natural cotton, 22" handles.

Groucho was a superb letter writer and this book contains some great examples. A lot of these letters were entertaining, but they were not written for anyone but the recipient. I read this book end to end - which, I now suspect to be an error: rather like eating too many delicious choccy treats, the confection was too rich. This is a book into which I shall dip and receive succulent provender on an occasional basis. They also lose something with age, the lingo and cadence of these missives are from another time. therestlessmouse, March 4, 2019.

Reissued today with his original letters and humor intact, The Groucho Letters exposes one of the twentieth century's most beloved comedian's private insights into show biz, politics, business, and, of course, his illustrious personal life. Included are Marx's conversations with such noted personalities as E. B. White, Fred Allen, Goodman Ace, Nunnally Johnson, James Thurber, Booth Tarkington, Alistair Cooke, Harry Truman, Irving Berlin, and S. J. Perelman.

Julius Henry "Groucho" Marx (/ˈɡraʊtʃoʊ/; October 2, 1890 – August 19, 1977) was an American comedian, writer, stage, film, radio, and television star

Julius Henry "Groucho" Marx (/ˈɡraʊtʃoʊ/; October 2, 1890 – August 19, 1977) was an American comedian, writer, stage, film, radio, and television star. A master of quick wit, he is widely considered one of America's greatest comedians. He made 13 feature films with his siblings the Marx Brothers, of whom he was the third-born. He also had a successful solo career, most notably as the host of the radio and television game show You Bet Your Life.

This classic collection of Groucho Marx's correspondence, which was donated to the Library of Congress, at their request, gives .

This classic collection of Groucho Marx's correspondence, which was donated to the Library of Congress, at their request, gives the best glimpse into who Groucho Marx was.

Author:Marx, Groucho. Publisher:INGRAM PUBLISHER SERVICES US. World of Books Australia was founded in 2005. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. Sold alia (385252)99. 2% positive FeedbackContact seller. The Groucho Letters: Letter from and to Groucho Marx by Groucho Marx (Paperback, 1994).

The Groucho Letters NPR coverage of The Groucho Letters: Letters From and To Groucho Marx by Marx Groucho. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more. Letters From and To Groucho Marx. Reissued as a thirtieth anniversary commemoration of the comedic master's death, a whimsical fan's collection of his personal letters includes his correspondences with such figures as Harry Truman, Jerry Lewis, and T. S. Eliot. 15,000 first printing.

No personage is too big, no nuance too small, no subject too far out for Groucho's spontaneous, hilarious, and ferocious typewriter. He writes to comics, corporations, children, presidents, and even his daughter's boyfriend. Here is Groucho swapping photos with T. S. Eliot (”I had no idea you were so handsome!”); advising his son on courting a rich dame (”Don't come out bluntly and say, 'How much dough have you got?' That wouldn't be the Marxian way”); crisply declining membership in a Hollywood club (”I don't care to belong to any social organization that will accept me as a member”); reacting with utmost composure when informed that he has been made into a verb by James Joyce (”There's no reason why I shouldn't appear in Finnegans Wake . I'm certainly as bewildered about life as Joyce was”); responding to a scandal sheet (”Gentleman: If you continue to publish slanderous pieces about me, I shall feel compelled to cancel my subscription”); describing himself to the Lunts (”I eat like a vulture. Unfortunately the resemblance doesn't end there”); and much, much more. That mobile visage, that look of wild amazement, and that weaving cigar are wholly captured, bound but untamed, in The Groucho Letters.
Qwert
Don't get your hopes up too high. I'm not saying DON'T buy this book, but these are letters, and they are thus out of context, so alot of humor that is probably there is lost on us modern folk. I've run across numerous cultural references that I realize are such but am not familiar with them enough to get a laugh out of it. And I am someone well versed in cinema and TV of yesteryear, and far more knowledgeable about history and life in past America than average.

Granted, you'll still find a quote or two you'll want to share with your friends for their hilarity, but, alot of the reading became arduous to me....

On the other hand, you have different fingers. And since these are letters, it's easy to pick up the book, read a snippet, put it down, then continue later, without feeling like you have to go back and re-read for context. Because there is no context!

It's like alot of random short stories. Or rather, parts thereof. It's like flipping around the TV and watching random bits of Marx brothers movies, at best.
Nuadazius
I wonder how many young people today--that is, anyone younger than 50--know or enjoy Groucho Marx. A product of the Vaudevillian Age, Groucho with his brothers Harpo, Chico, and Zeppo starred in a series of memorable slapstick films in the 1930's and 1940's. It was the age of Laurel and Hardy and the Three Stooges, but Marx Brothers films--full length features--were in a class by themselves.

While Zeppo never looked entirely comfortable in the quartet, Harpo and Chico were pure slapstick performers. Groucho enjoyed physical slapstick and was not above heaving a pie or sliding down a fire escape in his films, but his true talent was "verbal slapstick" and his one-liners have taken their place in American cultural history. [My personal favorite: "I would never belong to any club that would have me as a member."] After World War II Groucho's verbal dexterity made him a natural to ease into the medium of television, and he remained a celebrity of the small screen through the 1960's.

This collection of letters is drawn primarily from the television years, though gratefully the full correspondence [undated, in the text] between Marx and the legal department of Warner Brothers is retained in full. Warner Brothers contended that the Marx Brothers' proposed film, "A Night in Casablanca" was an impingement upon the studio's film, "Casablanca," made famous five years earlier by the performances of Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman. An outraged Groucho put pen to paper alleging that Warner Brothers' claim to exclusive rights to the name of the city of Casablanca was overreaching. By the end of the first letter he had outrageously undermined the rights of Harry and Jack Warner to their own names, pointing out to Jack that another Jack, Jack the Ripper, "cut quite a figure in his day." [15]

However, the Warner Brothers correspondence is the highlight of what is generally a modestly humorous survey of letters, ranging from 1939 to 1966. The majority are post-1950 when Marx enjoyed success with his long-running "You Bet Your Life" TV venture. Marx shows considerable ambivalence about television. His own show required little heavy lifting and made him a fair amount of money. But Marx in his correspondence, particularly with men of letters, belittles the medium as a junkyard. His letters to aging classic actors express sympathy that television, as a rule, did not cultivate significant artistic performance. Marx was evidently a voracious reader and he worried that the children of his day were losing interest in books because of the popularity of television.

Marx does not write much, if anything, about his wives. The reader is left to his or her own devices to figure out the makeup of the Marx household from year to year. He has Jerry Seinfeld's eye for the humor of daily life, such as misadventures with repairmen and large companies. He seemed to have enduring problems with the IRS, which crop up incessantly in the texts. He maintained good relations in writing with all his brothers. Harpo, in particular, was a fair writer in his own right. Curiously, Groucho, with his eternal leer and infamous double entendres on film and TV, reveals a bit of a prudish side in his letters. The writer who hoped to do a film with Mae West "if she doesn't die from curvature of the bed" [168] expresses in other letters his disgust over Broadway plays that have crossed the line of good taste into crudity and vulgarity. The moral boundaries of the noted wit are somewhat amorphous, to say the least.

In his preface to the collection, Arthur Sheekman compares Groucho Marx to Falstaff as "the cause of wit in other men." This is remarkably on target. One of the strengths of this work is the inclusion of letters written to Groucho. Throughout the wide range of correspondences with actors, writers, politicians and the like, one sees a tendency in Marx's correspondents to slip into "Groucho-ese" so to speak, a wit mixed with attention to detail and mild self-deprecation. The sheer breadth of correspondents from the higher echelons of show business--George S. Kaufman, Abe Burrows, Irving Berlin, David Susskind, S.J. Perlman, Arthur Sheekman, Leo Rosten, to cite but a few--give evidence of the old saying that the entertainment world is indeed a small town.

It speaks well of Marx's way with words that the book is an amusing read despite its being dated and peopled from several generations past. It is too eccentric to be called a genuine history, but it serves as an entertaining timepiece for an era when an aging actor could captivate the nation's television viewing audience with no props but a good cigar and a dagger wit.
Roru
If you are a Groucho fan, this book is for you. Seeing his writings validated his onscreen personality. Brilliant and witty. He was extremely articulate when writing. It is a very entertaining book and you can pick and choose letters based on where your interests lie and who you find interesting as a correspondent. A fun book for Groucho fans.
Alien
Groucho has said and written some pretty hilarious stuff, but this book also includes serious and sad and sometimes downright puzzling letters. I think some if the letters should have been explained. I don't know anything about "show business" and even less about screenwriters and other behind-the-scenes people. Letters addressed to them or referring to them are meaningless to me and somewhat boring. If this collection had been categorized and explained in advance a little I think I would have enjoyed it more. But I do recommend it to anyone who wants to learn the deeper side of Groucho Marx.
Skrimpak
Was curious about him. He certainly was witty . And he corresponded with many famous people of his time.
But he also seemed very sad.
Braswyn
If you love the backhanded comments of Groucho that you grew to love from the Marx Brothers comedies, you will LOVE this book. There are letters that he wrote to attorneys that were going to sue him and Groucho would respond to them and have the attorneys so confused they weren't sure how to respond back. It is so hilarious to read some of these letters that were only written from his humor and common sense. There are also touching letters to his brothers. I highly recommend this book for some good stomach laughs and just pure fun!!
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