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The Last Pictures ePub download

by Trevor Paglen

  • Author: Trevor Paglen
  • ISBN: 0520275004
  • ISBN13: 978-0520275003
  • ePub: 1616 kb | FB2: 1464 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Other Media
  • Publisher: University of California Press; First edition (September 19, 2012)
  • Pages: 208
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 248
  • Format: mobi azw lit lrf
The Last Pictures ePub download

Artist Trevor Paglen collaborated with materials scientists at the . Trevor Paglen - The Last Pictures from Creative Time. The Last Pictures featured in Wired Magazine.

Artist Trevor Paglen collaborated with materials scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to develop a micro-etched disc with one hundred photographs, encased in a gold-plated shell, designed withstand the rigors of space and to last for billions of years. Inspired by years of conversations and interviews with scientists, artists, anthropologists, and philosophers, the images chosen for The Last Pictures tell an impressionistic story of uncertainty, paradox, and anxiety about the future.

Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). The book showcases a diversity of photographic technologies, from surveillance shots taken by a drone to close-ups of the Ebola virus captured by an electron micrograph; this shuffling together of radically disparate scales makes for a thought-provoking browsing experience. The Last Pictures tells a dark but urgent story about present conditions of representational frustration. In the here and now, we have this book, a partial but chilling document of what we were, what we are, and what we might become.

Город: NYC, Berlin, SFПодписчиков: 14 ты. себе: I'm an artist

Город: NYC, Berlin, SFПодписчиков: 14 ты. себе: I'm an artist. Satellites, Deep-Time, Seeing Machines, Infrastructure, et. .

Inspired in part by ancient cave paintings, nuclear waste warning signs, and Carl Sagan's Golden Records of the 1970s, artist/geographer.

Read The Last Pictures, by Trevor Paglen online on Bookmate – Human civilizations' longest lasting artifacts are not the great Pyramids of Giza, nor the cave paintings at Lascaux, but the communica. Inspired in part by ancient cave paintings, nuclear waste warning signs, and Carl Sagan's Golden Records of the 1970s, artist/geographer Trevor Paglen has developed a collection of one hundred images that will be etched onto an ultra-archival, golden silicon disc.

The Last Pictures book.

The Last Pictures - Trevor Paglen. When Trevor Paglen approached Creative Time with his dream of creating an artwork destined for the geosynchronous orbit, we jumped at the opportunity. Creative Time Books New York. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS Berkeley Los Angeles London. For forty years, Creative Time has been presenting artists’ dream projects in the public realm. For the past dozen years, our own dreams have included commissioning a major public art project in outer space.

Artist Trevor Paglen is fascinated by the notion that these spacecraft will be the most enduring relics of human civilization. The project, The Last Pictures, rolls out in New York next week, ending a five-year journey. When invited by the public art organization Creative Time to make a project about space, he proposed to somehow send up images with a satellite, and that those images would be a story about what happened to the people who build the great ring of dead machines around Earth. Paglen micro-etched 100 photographs onto a silicon disc encased in a gold-plated shell.

Trevor Paglen, The Last Pictures, 200X-2012. Trevor Paglen, The Last Pictures, 2012

Trevor Paglen, The Last Pictures, 200X-2012. The image above, titled Glimpses of America, American National Exhibition, Moscow World’s Fair is one of a collection of 100 photographs placed onboard a communications satellite. NT: It’s a strange time we live in, as I can’t help but notice a certain nihilism, as you put it, in terms of a general mood of gloom with respect to the future. Trevor Paglen, The Last Pictures, 2012.

Human civilizations' longest lasting artifacts are not the great Pyramids of Giza, nor the cave paintings at Lascaux, but the communications satellites that circle our planet. In a stationary orbit above the equator, the satellites that broadcast our TV signals, route our phone calls, and process our credit card transactions experience no atmospheric drag. Their inert hulls will continue to drift around Earth until the Sun expands into a red giant and engulfs them about 4.5 billion years from now.The Last Pictures, co-published by Creative Time Books, is rooted in the premise that these communications satellites will ultimately become the cultural and material ruins of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, far outlasting anything else humans have created. Inspired in part by ancient cave paintings, nuclear waste warning signs, and Carl Sagan's Golden Records of the 1970s, artist/geographer Trevor Paglen has developed a collection of one hundred images that will be etched onto an ultra-archival, golden silicon disc. The disc, commissioned by Creative Time, will then be sent into orbit onboard the Echostar XVI satellite in September 2012, as both a time capsule and a message to the future.The selection of 100 images, which are the centerpiece of the book, was influenced by four years of interviews with leading scientists, philosophers, anthropologists, and artists about the contradictions that characterize contemporary civilizations. Consequently, The Last Pictures engages some of the most profound questions of the human experience, provoking discourse about communication, deep time, and the economic, environmental, and social uncertainties that define our historical moment.Copub: Creative Time Books
Jerdodov
Books like this often contain hidden gems; this one does, at least on several pages. The concept is a bit high-minded, but overall the quality of the images chosen, as well as their significance (admittedly, the latter being open to a very broad interpretation), is well handled.

What dissapoints here is the lack of care put into the editing and composition of the work. Why--especially in a book of this size and format--the editors felt it necessary to span multiple pages with images which would otherwise fit unbroken on a single leaf is beyond me. When you take a photograph and print all but one inch of it on one page, leaving the rest hidden in the binding, you destroy the point behind the book; you lose the image. The only way to see complete photos in several cases here is to unbind the book (that is, destroy it) and piece the pages back together.

Having known firsthand how unfortunate it is these days that many publishers just don't care about this sort of thing, were I Mr. Paglen (the author), I'd be a bit irritated over the layout and execution of an otherwise good work.

5 stars for the content; a big zero for how it was unfortunately mis-handled.
Realistic
Phenomenal project and glad I stumbled upon this book via a recent article about it online. I am an avid fan of "iconic" photo images and have done some freelance photography . Each photo in this project has its own unique story behind it for it to be included . Don't expect to see your traditional tourist photos or even photos of "famous" places or things . The project has a specific purpose and I believe it is told through the images as the author intended.
Reading the backstory behind the project is just as intriguing and the reader gets an insight into the research that was done in selecting "The Last Pictures"
Awesome collection of images & book ! .
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