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Tearing Down the Wall of Sound: The Rise and Fall of Phil Spector ePub download

by Mick Brown

  • Author: Mick Brown
  • ISBN: 0747591547
  • ISBN13: 978-0747591542
  • ePub: 1300 kb | FB2: 1581 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Music
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (2007)
  • Pages: 512
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 473
  • Format: lit lrf docx mbr
Tearing Down the Wall of Sound: The Rise and Fall of Phil Spector ePub download

Mick Brown interviewed Phil Spector soon before the murder occurred. It was the first interview of Phil Spector in 25 years. It is very possible that the interview played a factor, stirring up the demons that had been dormant for Instant Karma.

Mick Brown interviewed Phil Spector soon before the murder occurred. I just finished reading Tearing Down the Wall of Sound by Mick Brown. Mick Brown interviewed Phil Spector soon before the murder occurred.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Tearing Down the Wall of Sound is a remarkable book about, among other things, fame, obsession, genius. Brown has documented so many examples of Spector's bizarre habit over the years of locking people inside his house when they expressed a desire to leave, and threatening them with firearms, that an eventual tragic ending seemed inevitable. Indeed, one wonders why it didn't happen sooner.

Tearing Down the Wall of Sound is a biography of record producer Phil Spector, written by Mick Brown and published in 2008. Between 1961 and 1966, Spector's so-called "Wall of Sound" made him the most successful pop-record producer in the world, with more than 20 hits by artists such as The Righteous Brothers, The Crystals, and the Ronettes. Later in his life Spector became a recluse

Spector at the feast. Modern producers are terrified of the "leak" between microphones that built the Wall of Sound, and their records sound small by comparison

Spector at the feast. Mick Brown's Tearing Down the Wall of Sound charts the career of one of pop's greatest innovators, says Joy Boyd. Modern producers are terrified of the "leak" between microphones that built the Wall of Sound, and their records sound small by comparison. Just as his success was crowned by "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling", his time was over. The Brill Building pop of which he was the master was trumped first by the Beatles, then Dylan.

This is Brown's odyssey into the strange life and times of Phil Spector. In 2002, the reclusive and legendary record producer Phil Spector gave his first interview in twenty-five years to Mick Brown. Beginning with that fateful meeting in Spector's home and going on to explore his colourful and extraordinary life and career, including the unfolding of the Clarkson case, this is one of the most bizarre and compelling stories in pop history. The day after it was published an actress named Lana Clarkson was shot dead in Spector's LA castle. This is Brown's odyssey into the strange life and times of Phil Spector.

Phil Spector, born in the Bronx in 1939, grew up an outsider despised by his peers He scored hit after hit using a new technique called the wall of sound.

Phil Spector, born in the Bronx in 1939, grew up an outsider despised by his peers. He scored hit after hit using a new technique called the wall of sound. But the reign of the boy-man who owned pop culture seemed doomed by the British Invasion, and he spiraled into paranoid isolation and peculiar behavior.

In December 2002 Phil Spector - legendary record producer, legendary control freak, legendary recluse - sat down on a. .The journalist he talked to was Mick Brown. Shortly afterwards, Phil Spector was arrested for murder.

In December 2002 Phil Spector - legendary record producer, legendary control freak, legendary recluse - sat down on a sofa in his Los Angeles castle and gave his first major interview for twenty-five years.

Mick Brown (born 1950 in London) is a journalist who has written for several British newspapers, including The Guardian and The Sunday Times and for . Tearing Down the Wall of Sound: The Rise and Fall of Phil Spector.

Mick Brown (born 1950 in London) is a journalist who has written for several British newspapers, including The Guardian and The Sunday Times and for international publications. For many years he has contributed regularly to The Daily Telegraph Brown has written many articles about rock music and in 2007 wrote Tearing Down the Wall of Sound, a biography of record producer Phil Spector. Brown's biography of entrepreneur Richard Branson was first published in 1989.

Brown's biography, simply put, is the definitive Spector book. Posted on May 21, 2008April 4, 2012 by Edwin Turner. Brown’s biography, simply put, is the definitive Spector book.

Thetalune
This is a book you won't be able to put down once you get started reading it!!! I didn't know anything at all about the personal life of Mr. Spector and little knowledge of his rise/fall in the music industry until I purchased this book. Mr. Brown didn't leave anything out in his research on the life of Mr. Phil-if he did, I would be moderately surprised! If you don't read this book sometime along the way, you have missed out! So "fasten your seat-belts" and take a ride "on-the-reading" as they say and get ready for an adventure you won't forget!!!
Agalas
Not an easy read due to Spectors life sad, but definitely worth reading. Learned a lot of out the music I grew up with, the song writers and the man behind the music!
Doomredeemer
Well written, good research. Just a sad story.

Spector pulled a gun on LOTS of people over decades. It's a shame none of them pressed charges. The poor victim might still be alive. And Spector would have been forced to get effective treatment. He was seeing a psychiatrist and on lots of medication. But he apparently wasn't consistent, and also added alcohol to the mix.
Orll
I've read them all, and this is both the best-researched and best-written biography of Phil Spector. I got a fuller picture of Spector, the (troubled, neurotic, brilliant, unstable) man than I have from any other book. In addition, the author places Spector's work in its proper historic perspective, with great insights into the shifting world of pop music, from Spector's rise in the early 60s through his decline in the 70s. He interviewed many of those who helped to create the "wall of sound," so we get a good idea of how the Spector classics came to be, as well as innumerable amusing, interesting or, at times, appalling anecdotes. If you love Spector's music, or 60s pop in general, this is a must-read.
Talrajas
Phil Spector is easily one of the best producers in the history of rock and pop. His meteoric rise to stardom in the New York Music scene in the early 60s was legendary as was his work with the Crystals, the Ronettes, John Lennon and George Harrison. Unfortunately, his personal life was as disastrous as his professional life was stellar. This book dispassionately chronicles Spector's life from a child who endured his father's suicide to the accusations of murder which he eventually succumbed to. A sad, tragic story of yet another individual who seemed to have the world but really couldn't stop the demons from consuming him.....
Cyregaehus
Before reading this book, I had no idea which version of the Lana Clarkson story to believe: Did Phil Spector kill her, or did she commit suicide? After reading it, there is little doubt.

Brown does an excellent job of tracing Spector's life, and of giving us a glimpse of the recording industry in the golden age of rock and roll. But his signal achievement -- and I would guess, the primary purpose of the book -- is to establish a clear pattern of behavior over a several-decade period. Brown has documented so many examples of Spector's bizarre habit over the years of locking people inside his house when they expressed a desire to leave, and threatening them with firearms, that an eventual tragic ending seemed inevitable. (Indeed, one wonders why it didn't happen sooner.) Further, the idea that a young woman who displayed no evidence of depression, let alone suicidal ideation, would enter the house of a man she had met for the first time, and kill herself in the entryway as he stood directly in front of her (as evidenced by the blood spray on his coat), with that man's gun, is preposterous on its face.

Phil Spector is of course a tragic figure, the classic self-isolating genius; a man so afraid of being alone that he forcibly prevented guests from leaving his home, but so afraid of interpersonal relationships that he could not allow anyone to get close enough to help him find enduring relief from his mental illness or his alcoholism, despite an army of psychiatrists and a polypharmacy of psychoactive medications. Perhaps now, within the California correctional system, he will finally find the help he needs. It's just a shame that an innocent young woman had to die in the process.
Kriau
Tearing Down The Wall Of Sound is a balanced presentation of the Phil Spector story. He was a very complicated man who, at the age of nine years old, was traumatized by his father's suicide. Spector idolized his father and spent the rest of his life engaged in conflicts with those closest to him (his mother, sister, wives, etc.). He was a brilliant musician who treated his session players with respect. However, he treated all of his singers as disposable chattel as he was obsessed with his fame and stature in the pop music scene and did not want them to get the primary credit for his hit records. This book presents both sides of this complex individual; the hard detailed work he put into his revolutionary productions, his musical genius, and his ability to push the musical envelope. On the other hand, his callous treatment of most people he was involved with is detailed as well. Brown presents Spector as a bi-polar user of most of the people he personally knew. He did, however, lionize Lenny Bruce and John Lennon and treated them (and their legacy) with the utmost respect. The book makes an interesting point regarding his musical legacy. Most people regard "River Deep, Mountain High" as the pinnacle of his career. However, the author makes a convincing point that his greatest achievement is "You've Lost That Loving Feeling". Like most biographies of 1960's musical legends who peaked early, his story gets tedious from around the mid-1970's onwards as he spirals downward and deeper into a morass of unchecked mental illness. Brown gives numerous accounts of incidences where he threatened to kill various women. The book ends before his second murder trial. This is a very compelling account of a conflicted, unhappy musical genius. Here's hoping that Spector gets the proper psychological treatment he so obviously requires while spending the rest of his life in prison.
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