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African-American Concert Dance: The Harlem Renaissance and Beyond ePub download

by John Perpener

  • Author: John Perpener
  • ISBN: 0252026756
  • ISBN13: 978-0252026751
  • ePub: 1825 kb | FB2: 1965 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Music
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press; 1st Printing edition (August 3, 2001)
  • Pages: 284
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 632
  • Format: mobi lrf docx lrf
African-American Concert Dance: The Harlem Renaissance and Beyond ePub download

African-American Concert. has been added to your Cart. John O. Perpener III is an associate professor in the department of dance at Florida State University, Tallahassee.

African-American Concert.

African-American Concert Dance significantly advances the study of pioneering black dancers by providing valuable biographical and historical information on a group of artists who worked during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s to legitimize black dance as a serious art form

African-American Concert Dance significantly advances the study of pioneering black dancers by providing valuable biographical and historical information on a group of artists who worked during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s to legitimize black dance as a serious art form. Perpener sets these seminal artists and their innovations in the contexts of African-American culture and American modern dance and explores their creative synthesis of material from European-American, African-American, Caribbean, and African sources.

African-American Concert Dance book. Perpener sets these seminal artists and their innovations in the contexts of African-American cu African-American Concert Dance significantly advances the study of pioneering black dancers by providing valuable biographical and historical information on a group of artists who worked during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s to legitimize black dance as a serious art form.

Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press. xviii + 284 p. illustrations, notes, bibliography, index.

Perpener, John O. Publication date. African American dancers - Biography, African American dance - History, Harlem Renaissance. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Urbana : University of Illinois Press. Oliver Wendell Holmes Library. Uploaded by station19. cebu on October 15, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Black Dance From 1619 to 1970. Palo Alto, CA: National Press Books. Black Culture and the Harlem Renaissance. Houston: Rice University Press. Recommend this journal. Pennington, NJ: Princeton Book Company. Huggins, Nathan Irvin. New York: Oxford University Press. The Harlem Renaissance in Black and White. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Lewis, David Levering. When Harlem Was in Vogue.

John Perpener, African-American Concert Dance: The Harlem Renaissance and Beyond ((Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2001), 193. ^ Melanye P. White-Dixon, "McKayle, Donald," in Selma Jeanne Cohen (e., International Encyclopedia of Dance, vol. 4 (New York: Oxford. 4 (New York: Oxford University Press 1998), 345. ^ Gay Morris, A Game for Dancers: Performing Modernism in the Postwar Years, 1945–1960 (Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2006), 147–165. Elisa Davis, Transcending Boundaries? The Struggle of African-American Identity in the Works and Career of Donald McKayle from 1950 to 1973.

The Harlem Renaissance was an African American cultural movement that flourished in the 1920s and had . The Harlem Renaissance is unusual among literary and artistic movements for its close relationship to civil rights and reform organizations.

It was a time of great creativity in musical, theatrical, and visual arts but was perhaps most associated with literature ; it is considered the most influential period in African American literary history The Harlem Renaissance is unusual among literary and artistic movements for its close relationship to civil rights and reform organizations.

The Harlem Renaissance was an intellectual, social, and artistic explosion centered in Harlem, Manhattan, New York City, spanning the 1920s. The movement also included the new African-American cultural expressions across the urban areas in the Northeast and Midwest United States affected by the Great Migration, of which Harlem was the largest.

African-American Concert Dance significantly advances the study of pioneering black dancers by providing valuable biographical and historical information on a group of artists who worked during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s to legitimize black dance as a serious art form. John O. Perpener sets these seminal artists and their innovations in the contexts of African-American culture and American modern dance and explores their creative synthesis of material from European-American, African-American, Caribbean, and African sources.

Perpener begins with Hemsley Winfield, a versatile performer and director whose company, the New Negro Art Theatre, launched the careers of Edna Guy, Randolph Sawyer, and Ollie Burgoyne, among many others. Also profiled are Charles Williams, who directed the Hampton Creative Dance Group at the Hampton Institute in Virginia, and Asadata Dafora Horton, a native African who established himself as the preeminent purveyor of African dance and culture in America during the 1930s. Dafora's African Dance Troupe, which at one point came under the umbrella of the WPA Federal Theatre Project, was a focal point of the famous "voodoo" Macbeth, an all-black production set in Haiti and directed by the young Orson Welles.

Stepping onto the path cleared by these early innovators, two important artists combined dance with anthropology to expand the reach and scope of African-American dance. Katherine Dunham and Pearl Primus both studied anthropology and engaged in extensive fieldwork that infused their dances with Caribbean and African influences. Dunham founded two ambitious training schools, one in New York and one in East St. Louis, while Primus's projects included an African Arts Center in Monrovia, Liberia, dedicated to collecting dance material, teaching, and organizing professional performances.

Perpener examines the politics of racial and cultural difference and their impact on these early African-American dance leaders. In particular he documents the critical reception of their work, detailing the rigid preconceptions of African-American dance that white critics imposed on black artists. He also surveys important black dancers and choreographers since 1950, including Talley Beatty, Donald McKayle, Alvin Ailey, Eleo Pomare, Rod Rodgers, and Dianne McIntyre, and discusses how they have extended and diverged from traditions established by their predecessors.

hulk
Very insightful and informative.
Book was in great condition.
It gives you the history of modern dance and includes dancers you can't even google.
If you google some of these people who helped start new movements, they don't show up.
I have never heard of such a thing. Two thumbs up!

This is a must have for any passionate dancer.
Unh
I bought this book for school and it came to me quickly. It was in great condition, i had no problems!
Cargahibe
Great!
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