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Sonic Youth's Daydream Nation (33 1/3) ePub download

by Matthew Stearns

  • Author: Matthew Stearns
  • ISBN: 082641740X
  • ISBN13: 978-0826417404
  • ePub: 1861 kb | FB2: 1167 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Music
  • Publisher: Continuum; 1 edition (March 15, 2007)
  • Pages: 160
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 549
  • Format: lrf txt azw mobi
Sonic Youth's Daydream Nation (33 1/3) ePub download

I love Sonic Youth's Daydream Nation as much as the author does. I know it's a great album.

I love Sonic Youth's Daydream Nation as much as the author does. That's why I bought the book. Stearns' writing is so specific in its metaphors that it's eye-rollingly obnoxious, and it's almost as if he just wants us to take his love of Sonic Youth seriously.

Sonic Youth's Daydream Nation book. The author, musical critic Matthew Stearns, works backwards from the recent official acknowledgment as a true historical document: in 2006 the US Library of Congress added Daydream Nation to the permanent archives of the National Recording Registry. Nice deed for an indie rock album.

Written by Matthew Stearns, Audiobook narrated by David LeDoux. Matthew Stearns combines critical insight, reportage, and enthusiastic personal remembrances in Sonic Youth's 'Daydream Nation', a part of the 33 1/3 series. Given an engaged, richly voiced performance by David LeDoux, Stearns’ book picks apart, on a musical and lyrical level, this groundbreaking 1988 album by the New York avant-garde band that later influenced groups like Nirvana and the Pixies.

Daydream Nation is. Along the way, Stearns gives a helpful overview of the band members themselves (most of. . Along the way, Stearns gives a helpful overview of the band members themselves (most of whom he appears to have interviewed), annotating how their omnivorous cultural feedings and art-school backgrounds created such an ambition and uncategorizeable piece of work.

Matthew Stearns explores the album from a range of angles, including a track-by-track analysis and a look at the .

Matthew Stearns explores the album from a range of angles, including a track-by-track analysis and a look at the historical and cultural context within which the album was made. Daydream Nation is the kind of gorgeous monstrosity (born of extremes, rife with difficulties, and mythic in proportion) that can crush the will of the most resilient, well-intentioned listener if the necessary preparations havent been made. Matthew Stearns explores the album from a range of angles, including a track-by-track analysis and a look at the historical and cultural context within which the album was made.

Daydream Nation is the fifth studio album by American alternative rock band Sonic Youth

Daydream Nation is the fifth studio album by American alternative rock band Sonic Youth. The band recorded the album between July and August 1988 at Greene St. Recording in New York City, and it was released in October by Enigma Records as a double album. Daydream Nation was the group's last record before signing to a major label. After Daydream Nation was released in October 1988, it received widespread acclaim from critics and earned Sonic Youth a major label deal

Sonic Youth's 'Daydream Nation'.

Sonic Youth's 'Daydream Nation'. Featuring a foreword by Lee Ranaldo and exclusive interviews with the band, this truly is the definitive guide to Daydream Nation. People Who Liked Sonic Youth's 'Daydream Nation' Also Liked These Free Titles

Matthew Stearns clearly loves the album and. Matthew Stearns is a regular contributor to Resonance magazine. Sonic Youth's Daydream Nation 33 1/3. Автор.

Matthew Stearns clearly loves the album and. Библиографические данные. Bloomsbury Publishing USA, 2007.

Daydream Nation is the kind of gorgeous monstrosity (born of extremes, rife with difficulties, and mythic in proportion) that can crush the will of the most resilient, well-intentioned listener if the necessary preparations haven't been made. Matthew Stearns explores the album from a range of angles, including a track-by-track analysis and a look at the historical and cultural context within which the album was made. Featuring a foreword by Lee Ranaldo and exclusive interviews with the band, this truly is the definitive guide to Daydream Nation.
Adrielmeena
I've been listening to this album for about 14 years. It's one of the most influential albums of my young life and for certain helped me expand out of the tight circle of music I had back in my teenage high school years. I regularly wax poetic about it to anyone who will bother to listen.

But this book... whoa.

Stearns is a music journalist. Every single section begins with a quote or an excerpt from somewhere. Then an exceptionally hyperbolic thesis statement on how each aspect explored is the most masterful thing to have ever been committed to tape.

The music. The themes. The settings.

I swear to god if I have to read, see or hear any other piece of media that claims New York City is just as much a character / part of the band I will shoot myself.

I cringed half the time I was reading this book. The masturbatory purple prose seems to SEEK to make you feel uncomfortable.

However...

What I find most fascinating about the book is the depictions actually shown from the interviews and quotes from Sonic Youth and the sound engineer that worked on Daydream Nation.

While Stearns is stumbling over himself to gush maximally over anything and everything Sonic Youth, the most refreshing part of the book is that the members of Sonic Youth seem humble and modest in comparison. It further grounds an already down-to-Earth band which lends more power to the material.

Stearns does shed excellent light on context and insight into the band and the thoughts and feelings poured into the creation of the album along the way which makes the price of admission worth it, if you can just push through the cringe worthy prose. A lovely irony I weaved into the narrative happens most often during the track by track analysis. While walking the reader step by step through each song, Stearns reaches *REAL* hard into his high school English AP skills and digs hard into the symbolism and imagery of the songs. There's a section where Lee Ranaldo describes how he was floored by reading Raymond Carver's "What We Do When We Talk About Love" for the first time and how he fell in love with American Minimalist writers and the power they packed into such sparse stories. There's more density in what you didn't say than what you did is the lesson to be gleamed there... but Stearns seems to bruise, batter and contort EVERY SINGLE LYRIC to tease out any and all literal possible meanings of what's happening in each song. And if you get a feel for what Ranaldo says about Carver and the types of stream-of-consciousness that's employed in it... the analysis feels like he's reaching HARD or more often just plain wrong. Yet... I find myself empathizing because he does truly love the album and he seeks to apply and project his own lens and vocabulary onto it in the ways he knows how. So I can't fault him. Even if it is so brazenly self-indulgent.

Being a sort of counter-culturalist at heart, I haven't decided if it's a stroke of genius for Stearns to gush so exceptionally over the album that it's forced me to confront my own feelings and ideas about how I perceive the album and I find myself really analyzing it for what *I* like about the music and album as a whole rather than fall prey to the 160 page circle jerk session this lends.

I really think it's worth reading, but please, take it for a heaping grain of salt. Remember what YOU like and why you like it and compare it against what you read.
Ienekan
the writing is just too much. i will now open to a random page...

"And the final ring of "Teen Age Riot's" struck chords recede into silence. There's a moment, a microbeat, similar to that instant in the breathing cycle when the dynamic switches from the used-air release of exhalation to the oxygen-rejuvenation rush in inhalation, when the current track is over but the next hasn't quite begun. In this small window, we're given a short break to savor the exhaustion of "Teen Age Riot's" charged, fluid advance and this it's back to business. Before we've caught our breath, the howl of "Sliver Rocket" comes screeching over the horizon (starting from the left channel, it sweeps steadily across the stereo image, and settles into the right), unleashing sortie after sortie of chemical-rash inducing guitar assaults."

it's all like this. a gap between two songs can't be simply a gap between two songs; no, it has to be THE MOST PORTENTOUS MOMENT EVER !

too much.
Tehn
I have to say that this is actually on of my favorites in the series so far. Stearns was able to go to the source, and spent a lot of time interviewing members of SY, which adds a lot of great information and depth to his book. I was also incredibly hooked by the introduction, where Stearns has some incredibly insightful things to say about music, recorded sound and the album format in general. I appear to be in the minority here, but I rank this one highly.
Ucantia
Far too excited. To the point of unreadable. It's a pity, because it's one of my favourite albums.
Sinredeemer
A+
The Sinners from Mitar
Jesus, Im a huge Sonic Youth fan, but this writing is HORRIBLE. I was looking forward to this book, and 1/2 liked the Pavement book, but i had to stop reading this. Irs exactly what a sy naysayer would expect from a boom about sy.. too many words that have beed stretched for, my favorite record was almost ruined by this garbage. Check out michael azerras our band could be your life or alex foeges confusion is next... and now i burn this blasphemy
Qulcelat
Economy of language is a phrase often used when talking about modern writing, and it may be used here. For every good, hard sentence in Stearns' book there are at least 500 hyperbolic adjectives and glaring adverbs. I paid ten dollars for the book, but now I believe the information is only worth two or three of those dollars. Again, Stearns spends most of his time trying to convince you that Sonic Youth is a great band and that the album is amazing, and he tries so hard that it makes me question if the album really is that good (but of course it is). My recommendation, skim the book in the bookstore or just read the Wikipedia article on Daydream Nation.
Not only is the writing bad, there is no research, no interviews, no insight into the work being reviewed. The author chokes in front of the crucial moments of the work he is in awe of. He regurgitates the words, no insights, no information, sometimes worse- free association. The writer has no critical, interpretational or comparative skills, not to mention lack of research. This books only value is the partial printing of the lyrics. The liner notes of the reissued CD have more information on the recording process and the ideas of the artists than this book. I think the editors must be aiming at 12 year olds with this publication. Dont bother to waste your time or money.
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