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A Boy Named Sue: Gender and Country Music (American Made Music Series) ePub download

by Kristine M. McCusker,Diane Pecknold

  • Author: Kristine M. McCusker,Diane Pecknold
  • ISBN: 1578066778
  • ISBN13: 978-1578066773
  • ePub: 1362 kb | FB2: 1846 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Music
  • Publisher: University Press of Mississippi (November 2, 2004)
  • Pages: 208
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 530
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A Boy Named Sue: Gender and Country Music (American Made Music Series) ePub download

Country Boys and Redneck Women: New Essays in Gender and Country Music (American Made . Just as academics try to discuss masculinities, rather than masculinity, this book could have had country musicS in its title, rather than country music in the singular form.

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). The difference between female and male artists is stressed. Further, the Nashville Sound is differentiated from other forms.

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From Hank Thompson's "The Wild Side of Life" to Johnny Cash's "A Boy Named Sue," from Tammy Wynette's "Stand by Your Man" to Loretta Lynn's ode to birth control, "The Pill," A Boy Named Sue demonstrates the role gender played in the development of country music and its current prominence.

A Boy Named Sue book. Interesting how gender has made a difference in what music recording companies record, publish, promote. From the smiling, sentimental mothers portrayed in 1930s radio barn.

Kristine M. McCusker, Diane Pecknold, eds. A Boy Named Sue: Gender and Country Music. A Boy Named Sue is organized in chronological fashion, which helps the reader track developments of gender issues in country music

Kristine M. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2004. A Boy Named Sue is organized in chronological fashion, which helps the reader track developments of gender issues in country music.

Home Browse Books Book details, A Boy Named Sue: Gender and Country Music. By Kristine M. McCusker, Diane Pecknold

Home Browse Books Book details, A Boy Named Sue: Gender and Country Music. McCusker, Diane Pecknold. In the context of American popular music, one of the most traveled paths leads to the satisfaction of an insatiable appetite for authenticity. Confronted by globalization, cross-media merchandising, and the vertigo-inducing transfer of entertainment properties between an ever-shrinking number of conglomerates, many people yearn for something unsullied by deal making, debt ceilings, and demographic surveys.

Country music boasts a long tradition of rich, contradictory gender dynamics, creating a world .

Country music boasts a long tradition of rich, contradictory gender dynamics, creating a world where Kitty Wells could play the demure housewife and the honky-tonk angel simultaneously, Dolly Parton could move from traditionalist girl singer to outspoken trans rights advocate, and current radio playlists can alternate between the reckless masculinity of bro-country and the adolescent girlishness of Taylor Swift

Learning this, Sue makes peace with his father and they reconcile. Kristine M. McCusker, Diane Pecknold (2004) A Boy Named Sue: Gender and Country Music, University Press of Mississippi, ISBN 1-57806-678-6.

Learning this, Sue makes peace with his father and they reconcile. With his lesson learned, Sue closes the song with a promise to name his son "Bill or George, anything but Sue". Structure In the film Swingers, one of the male characters is named Sue. The name is explained by another character by saying, "his dad was a big Johnny Cash fa.

From the smiling, sentimental mothers portrayed in 1930s radio barn dance posters, to the sexual shockwaves generated by Elvis Presley, to the female superstars redefining contemporary country music, gender roles and imagery have profoundly influenced the ways country music is made and enjoyed. Proper male and female roles have influenced the kinds of sounds and images that could be included in country music; preconceptions of gender have helped to determine the songs and artists audiences would buy or reject; and gender has shaped the identities listeners made for themselves in relation to the music they revered.

This interdisciplinary collection of essays is the first book-length effort to examine how gender conventions, both masculine and feminine, have structured the creation and marketing of country music. The essays explore the uses of gender in creating the personas of stars as diverse as Elvis Presley, Patsy Cline, and Shania Twain. The authors also examine how deeply conventions have influenced the institutions and everyday experiences that give country music its image: the popular and fan press, the country music industry in Nashville, and the line dance crazes that created the dance hall boom of the 1990s.

From Hank Thompson's "The Wild Side of Life" to Johnny Cash's "A Boy Named Sue," from Tammy Wynette's "Stand by Your Man" to Loretta Lynn's ode to birth control, "The Pill," A Boy Named Sue demonstrates the role gender played in the development of country music and its current prominence.