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The Pianoforte in the Classical Era ePub download

by Michael Cole

  • Author: Michael Cole
  • ISBN: 0198166346
  • ISBN13: 978-0198166344
  • ePub: 1964 kb | FB2: 1589 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Music
  • Publisher: Clarendon Press (April 9, 1998)
  • Pages: 440
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 735
  • Format: doc rtf mobi doc
The Pianoforte in the Classical Era ePub download

Home Browse Books Book details, The Pianoforte in the Classical Er. In a period of only thirty years in the second half of the eighteenth century European musical culture underwent a remarkable transformation.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Pianoforte in the Classical Era. The Pianoforte in the Classical Era. By Michael J. Cole. In 1765 the harpsichord was the indispensable item in almost every concert and in every home where music was practised; the sound of the pianoforte was virtually unknown to most music lovers. Yet by 1795 the situation was entirely reversed.

Michael Cole, a harpsichord and fortepiano maker, has written a delightful and entertaining book. It is thanks to the prescient and skilful management of the late academic music-book division of OUP that this important book can be placed alongside its distinguished companions on our shelves. The practical bias of his knowledge is manifested time and again Harpsichord & fortepiano, Vol 9, No. 1, Spring 2001 Technical books on the piano are usually best written by makers and restorers, and Cole comes to the subject as one of these. This is rare and to be welcomed. It is thanks to the prescient and skilful management of the late academic music-book division of OUP that this important book can be placed alongside its distinguished companions on our shelves

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The pianoforte was indispensable and the harpsichord had become all but obsolete - except in the most . New insights are offered into the parameters that governed the performance of keyboard music in the Classical Era. Show more. Michael Cole.

The pianoforte was indispensable and the harpsichord had become all but obsolete - except in the most backward and conservative establishments. Three hundred years of harpsichord dominance had ended, and workshops that had been busy producing them either ceased trading or switched hurriedly to the new hammer-action instruments.

Piano Sonata No. 11 in A Major, K. 331: Rondo: Alla turca, 03:25. The Rasmus In the Shadows. Радио Рекорд - Rock radio. Sonata No. 26 in E-Flat Major for Piano, Op. 81a, "Les adieux": III. The Return: Vivacissimamente, 07:19.

A fortepiano is an early piano. In principle, the word "fortepiano" can designate any piano dating from the invention of the instrument by Bartolomeo Cristofori around 1700 up to the early 19th century. Most typically, however, it is used to refer to the late-18th to early-19th century instruments for which Haydn, Mozart, and the younger Beethoven wrote their piano music.

All these composers belong to the Classical era, and all are interesting and enjoyable on their own terms.

Soon the harpsichord would seem a quaint relic. One defining feature of Classical music was the rise of comic opera, for opera would have been central to an 18th century music enthusiast's experiences. All these composers belong to the Classical era, and all are interesting and enjoyable on their own terms.

The Classical period was an era of classical music between roughly 1730 and 1820. The Classical period falls between the Baroque and the Romantic periods. Classical music has a lighter, clearer texture than Baroque music and is less complex

The Classical period was an era of classical music between roughly 1730 and 1820. Classical music has a lighter, clearer texture than Baroque music and is less complex. It is mainly homophonic, using a clear melody line over a subordinate chordal accompaniment, but counterpoint was by no means forgotten, especially later in the period.

The Pianoforte in the Classical Era. Article.

Hornbostel & Sachs created a widely accepted classification for system for musical instruments, almost universally used in museums and academic circles since the early 20th century.

This book charts the progress of the piano and related instruments during the lifetimes of Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven. Wherever possible the author returns to the original sources--a wide variety of previously unreported documents, as well as surviving instruments--to reconstruct the history of the pianoforte that radically departs from earlier theories of many of the most fundamental issues. A wide range of instruments, each carefully described, is placed in a precise chronological and cultural setting. New insights are offered into the parameters that governed the performance of keyboard music in the Classical Era.