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The Experience of Retirement ePub download

by David J. Ekerdt,Robert S. Weiss

  • Author: David J. Ekerdt,Robert S. Weiss
  • ISBN: 0801472520
  • ISBN13: 978-0801472527
  • ePub: 1514 kb | FB2: 1961 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Personal Finance
  • Publisher: ILR Press (November 1, 2005)
  • Pages: 240
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 794
  • Format: lrf txt lrf doc
The Experience of Retirement ePub download

In The Experience of Retirement, Robert S. Weiss puts a human face on current workplace trends. This marvelous book provides a fascinating look at the experiences of men and women as they make the transition from work to retirement.

In The Experience of Retirement, Robert S. By brilliantly using in-depth interviewing techniques and analysis to depict retirees' status 'on the ground,' Weiss makes a compelling case for questioning the incongruence of modern workplace trends such as downsizing,reorganization, and 'voluntary' retirement with public policies that aim to support and sustain quality of 'after-work' life.

In The Experience of Retirement, the distinguished sociologist Robert S. Weiss provides . The book is based on extensive interviews with eighty-nine men and women before and after their retirement from middle-income careers. Weiss provides a detailed description of how some people plan their retirement, what life in retirement is like, and what makes for a fulfilling retirement. His engaging book can thus serve as a most useful guide. Weiss shows us both retirement's benefits and its possible costs, both the relief retirees can feel once free of work's stresses and constraints and the discomfort that can be caused by loss of the positive aspects of working life.

See if your friends have read any of David J. Ekerdt's books. David J. Ekerdt’s Followers. None yet. Ekerdt. Ekerdt’s books. Encyclopedia Of Aging.

The Experience of Retirement. With a Foreword by David J. Published by: Cornell University Press, ILR Press. Weiss .

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Read "The Experience of Retirement" by Robert S. Weiss and David J. Retired Faculty Association. Campus Box 80 UCB Boulder, CO 80309-0390.

Retirement brings with it the promises of leisure and freedom as well as the risks of boredom and isolation. When retirees rid their schedules of anything resembling the kinds of obligations that once had been imposed by work, they will experience a sometimes-uncomfortable absence of structure. In The Experience of Retirement, the distinguished sociologist Robert S. Weiss provides a detailed description of how some people plan their retirement, what life in retirement is like, and what makes for a fulfilling retirement. His engaging book can thus serve as a most useful guide. Weiss shows us both retirement's benefits and its possible costs, both the relief retirees can feel once free of work's stresses and constraints and the discomfort that can be caused by loss of the positive aspects of working life.The book is based on extensive interviews with eighty-nine men and women before and after their retirement from middle-income careers. Weiss makes vivid their experiences by presenting, in their own words, their descriptions of leaving their careers, considering what to do with their time, confronting issues of income in retirement, dealing, sometimes, with social isolation, and reorganizing their lives. The interviews reveal the way in which retirement affects marriages and other familial relationships. Weiss concludes by presenting advice about retirement based on the actual experiences of retirees. For anyone approaching the age of retirement or already retired and looking for a more satisfying post-career life, for personnel managers, health care professionals, and all those who provide services for the retired, The Experience of Retirement will be an illuminating guidebook to this phase of life.

Whatever
DO NOT buy it. REFUSE to accept it as a gift. If all else fails, BURN IT.

I've been retired for 2 1/2 years--happily, until I read this. Now I'm miserable.

This book was recommended in an otherwise good newspaper article (Wall Street Journal, I think). This is by far the worst thing that I've read on retirement. Every chapter stinks; the next piece of advice worse than the last; every story is terrible.
Braendo
I will be using this book as a text in a course entitled "Exploring Retirement" in the Five College Learning in Retirement Program. I had been hunting for a useful book to discuss issues important to retirees, and when I found Robert Weiss's text (why do you put David Eckerdt as the author? He wrote the foreword, but is not the author.), I knew I had found the perfect book. Weiss is not only knowledgeable, but writes with great clarity and intersperses his text with telling commentary from his sources. It made me re-think many issues pertaining to my own retirement. Can't recommend this book highly enough.
Wel
The book was a gift for my husband and was recommended by a friend. It arrived in a few days.
krot
I read this book on the recommendation the Wall Street Journal. It is not a "rah rah" upbeat kind of book, but I think there is a lot of real life wisdom in it. It helped illuminate the feelings I am having adjusting to a recent retirement -- some good and some bad.

Because of this book, I will probably get a small business going that takes 10 to 20 hours of my time a week. I do miss the community and the feeling of accomplishment that comes from work.

Reassuring to know that I am not the only one who loves to putter away the day and savors the second cup of coffee in the morning. Oh, the joys of be free from a regular job.

Lots of food for thought in the book. I spent an hour talking about it with my boyfriend last night. Just bought him his own copy. That as good of a recommendation as I can give.

The reason I give it 4 stars is that it seems like the data set was fairly limited.
Silverbrew
Useless
Rocksmith
As a career consultant and former academic, I am a great admirer of Robert Weiss. I continue to recommend Learning From Strangers to students who want to learn qualitative research. And I am of an age when retirement can be a realistic option for the current or near future.

So naturally I looked forward to this book, hoping for new insights and ideas.

Experience of Retirement is based on interviews with a sample of retired people in the Greater Boston area. As the author explains, most were chosen from middle class neighborhoods, although a few self-selected after reading about the study. The book itself comes from depth interviews with these retirees, divided into chapters based on typical retirement issues.

Perhaps the best part of the book comes in the Introductioon, where the author reflects on his own retirement. Unfortunately, the rest of the book seems as prosaic (and almost as dated) as the gold watch pictured on the front cover. Authors rarely get to choose their own cover art, so we have to ask why the publishers chose a stereotypical image for a book that questions retirement stereotypes.

Because the interviewees were chosen to be "typical" or "ordinary" middle class retirees, their stories are, well, typical. It's not realistic to generalize beyond this rather narrow sample and in any case, their insights just aren't that profound or novel. Retirees enjoy extended breakfast hours...well, okay, but so what?

The biggest gap of the book is the lack of reference to single, never-married retirees. Some interviewees have been divorced or widowed, but I don't recall references to bachelors. Some time ago I read research suggesting that single people actually fared better on their own because they had learned to enjoy their own company.

Other sections are simply too short to be useful. His relocation advice on pages 184-185 seems completely accurate and helpful (based on my own background as a relocation "expert"). Dependence on an automobile and separation from friends creates special challenges, often arising from a wish to move to a lower-cost, slower-paced small town.

But I'd like to go deeper. Volunteer work has a different kind of energy than paid work. Someone who misses the challenge and competition of working for pay needs to explore new worlds, such as working online.

Those who want to work face social pressures to look younger, and these pressures have financial impact. A woman could easily spend $100-$200 a month or more on hair, makeup and manicures. It's no longer enough to cover gray: now you're judged on highlights. And a sixty-something woman may be less than thrilled by what's considered the requisite fashion in shoes.

I wish Weiss had drawn on his superb sociological background to develop a sustained theoretical framework to explain retirement. Do retirees take on new roles in society? Are they a form of new social class -- a lower class, to be sure? A new culture? He could have referred to the seminal book Becoming an Ex, a sociological classic about leaving one role that formerly defined us.

But perhaps there are more basic difficulties with the whole notion of retirement. It's difficult to accept the retirement experience from the aging experience. And the greatest challenges of aging may be inherently sociological. The aging cohort clashes with the values and demands of the younger cohorts. We face an outdated social infrastructure, designed for a time when age fifty meant "old" and geographic boundaries made sense.
The Apotheoses of Lacspor
excellent book on the experience of retirement.... i only wish i had read it before i took early retirment from college teaching.... makes me feel a lot saner reading the interviews in this book!
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