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Megatrends Asia ePub download

by John Naisbitt

  • Author: John Naisbitt
  • ISBN: 1857881443
  • ISBN13: 978-1857881448
  • ePub: 1975 kb | FB2: 1772 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Management & Leadership
  • Publisher: Brealey, Nicholas Publishing (February 1, 1997)
  • Pages: 318
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 710
  • Format: lit lrf txt rtf
Megatrends Asia ePub download

John Naisbitt (born January 15, 1929 in Salt Lake City, Utah) is an American author and public speaker in the area of futures studies. His first book Megatrends: Ten New Directions Transforming Our Lives was published in 1982

John Naisbitt (born January 15, 1929 in Salt Lake City, Utah) is an American author and public speaker in the area of futures studies. His first book Megatrends: Ten New Directions Transforming Our Lives was published in 1982. It was on The New York Times Best Seller List for two years, mostly as No. 1. Megatrends was published in 57 countries and sold more than 14 million copies.

This book, Megatrends Asia, is just one in a long line of such works. The author uses empirical and statistical data to draw out 8 trends that are transforming the region into a world economic powerhouse. These trends are presented as primarily a shift from a rural, state-directed economy to a networked, consumer-driven, city-based economy.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The author of Megatrends reveals the explosive changes currently taking place in Asia while considering how these changes will affect the rest of the world and predicting a major shift in international economic forces.

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In this, the mother of all megatrends books (Wall Street Journal), John Naisbitt, the trend forecaster known throughout the world for his accuracy and acuity, turns hi attention to the explosive events occurring in Asia, and reveals the impact this area of the world will have on global economics, politics, and culture.

Megatrends Asia by John Naisbitt - America's trend forecaster reveals the global transformation that affects the future for us. .Thank you for signing up, fellow book lover! Tell us what you like, so we can send you books you'll love.

Megatrends Asia by John Naisbitt - America's trend forecaster reveals the global transformation that affects the future for us all!The most momentous global. Audiobooks Book Club Newsletter Biography & Autobiography Business & Personal Finance Children Christian Cooking. eBooks Entertainment & Pop Culture History New Releases Mystery Politics Romance.

All of these megatrends will profoundly influence the way Asia does business with the West - and the way America does business with Asia. There are unprecedented opportunities and, Naisbitt warns, enormous challenges

All of these megatrends will profoundly influence the way Asia does business with the West - and the way America does business with Asia. There are unprecedented opportunities and, Naisbitt warns, enormous challenges. An astute observer of the Asian scene for three decades, he spells out these pitfalls and opportunities, drawing upon a wide range of informed sources and his own interviews with political leaders, intellectuals, entrepreneurs, and businessmen and -women of many nations.

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Grand Insights, slightly mistimed. com User, December 24, 2004. I read this book as my interest in Asia was beginning. Naisbitt's methodology of tracking trends is perhaps not entirely scientific, but it is more precise than much of what passes as future watching. Certainly we left the American century and are now entering the Asian one. Naisbitt falls down in his timing.

While the attention of the West has been fixed on the USSR and Eastern Europe, a quieter, cumulative revolution has been taking place in Asia which may have even more profound consequences for world history. As we move towards 2000, Asia will become the dominant region of the world: economically, politically and culturally. Up until the 1990s, the West set the rules. Now, Asians are creating their own rules and will soon determine the game as well. Even Japan will be left behind as the countries of South East Asia, led by the Overseas Chinese and China, increasingly hold economic sway. In the Asian Renaissance, a new network of nations based on economic symbiosis and the enterprise of the Overseas Chinese is emerging in a global shift of the world's centre of economic and political gravity. The Asian continent, from India to Japan, from below the old Soviet Union down to Indonesia, now accounts for more than half of the world's population. And as many as half a billion will be what the West consider middle class. That market is roughly the size of the United States and Europe combined. This is a consumer miracle holding vast economic consequences. Furthermore, a huge urban shift is moving Asia to the information age as it rushes towards computers and telecommunications. There is an unprecedented increase in women entrepreneurs. Asians believe that not only is the cost of the welfare state a heavy burden on competitiveness, but it is also socially destructive; in Asia, families take care of themselves above all else. This raises central questions for the West, especially for the USA and Europe. The modernization of Asia is best understood not as Westernization, but as the Asianization of Asia as the global axis of influence shifts from West to East. The eight Asian megatrends that are changing the world are: from nation states to networks; from export-led to consumer-driven; from Western influence to the Asian way; from government-controlled to market-driven; from villages to supercities; from labour-intensive to high technology; from male dominance to the emergence of women; and from West to East. John Naisbitt is the author of "Megatrends" and "Global Paradox".
dermeco
It was outdated but all of the information was accurate to dary. Mr. Naisbitt had great insight as he foretold some 20 yrs ago about the collapse of one national and the rise of another. This was very interested reading.
Llathidan
One of the consistent themes in recent Western literature is a habit of comparing East Asian culture and society with those in the West, and specifically, to pick out those features of East Asian society that were unique and intrinsice to East Asia. Known as Orientalism, this genre had a condenscending undercurrent and brought forth images of coolies pulling rickshaws, corrupt officials smoking in opium dens, and Western sailors catching "yellow fever" in places like Bangkok and Singapore.

From the 1970s' onward, Orientalism has been replaced by growing praise of the economies of the East Asian countries, especially those with large Chinese populations such as Taiwan, Malaysia and China itself. Boasting the virtues of good education, disciplined populations, and strong family ties, Westerners have authored thousands of books on the growing power of the Orient. This book, Megatrends Asia, is just one in a long line of such works. The author uses empirical and statistical data to draw out 8 trends that are transforming the region into a world economic powerhouse. These trends are presented as primarily a shift from a rural, state-directed economy to a networked, consumer-driven, city-based economy. All this is true, but the author fails to fully explore several trends that though are not as positive and beneficial, are still as important in dictating the future of this region. Specifically, these trends are

1. The growing dependence on imported energy. Notice China's overtures to various West Asian countries due to oil and natural gas needs.

2. The spread of AIDS, heart disease, obesity, and other "lifestyle" illnesses.

3. The growth of military spending AND foreign military involvement in the various East Asian countries.

4. The growth in the black market of this region. Forget about the Hondas made in Japan or the seafood farmed in Thailand. What is really making dollars is all the illegal activity such as intellectual property infringement, the sex trade, the production and marketing of dirt cheap consumer goods sporting brand names from Europe's fashion centers...

5. The mass, and often forced, migration of whole communities to make way for factories, highways, and other features of an industrial economy.

6. The rise of militant Islam. Especially noticeable in Indonesia and Malaysia, but also present in Singapore, Phillipines and Thailand, this foreboding trend is making the orient the next battle ground in Bush's War on Terror.

Overall, this book is good, but not great. It correctly recognizes and explores major, region-wide changes, but ignores or minimizes several other major changes.
Uaha
This book is frighteningly like the accolades written in the thirties in support of Fascism. Newspeak prevails. The "eight pillars" are no more than a series of propaganda slogans endorsed by the People's Ministry of Truth.

As one example, the Naisbitts hold up something called "vertical democracy" as a new, improved, Asian alternative to the "Western" model. Vertical democracy, however, is never defined. instead it appears to be a management slogan that would be more familiar to an MBA than a corporate lawyer.
Even propaganda might be worth reading if the chapters each broke new ground. After the first few pages, however, the Naisbitts' theme becomes predictable. A western principle, e.g. free speech is raised as an arrogant shibboleth only to be toppled in the face of glorious examples of State Corporatism. For example, in the "pillar" devoted toward liberating the artists and intellectuals, a few anecdotes are given about how individuals have become wealthy selling their work in a global market while explaining that conformity to the State line is good for business. Suppression of a free press is written off as necessary to good order.

Chinese excesses such as cultural hegemony within its own borders, support for abusive governments in Korea, Burma, Africa or the mideast, are celebrated as examples of how stupid the west is not to understand the beneficient intent of the Chinese system. Classism, a rising issue in China, is not mentioned.

The claim to predict the future would be all too familiar t corporate flacks working for Microsoft, Sony, Phillips, Putin, or il Duce.
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