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Leader to Leader, Leadership Breakthroughs from West Point: A Special Supplement, 2005 (J-B Single Issue Leader to Leader) ePub download

by Joe LeBoeuf,Thomas A. Kolditz,Major Doug Crandall,Major Brian Tribus,Major Todd D. Woodruff,Major Eric J. Weis,Major Chip Daniels,Major Patrick R. Michaelis,Major Everett S. P. Spain,Major Remi Hajjar

  • Author: Joe LeBoeuf,Thomas A. Kolditz,Major Doug Crandall,Major Brian Tribus,Major Todd D. Woodruff,Major Eric J. Weis,Major Chip Daniels,Major Patrick R. Michaelis,Major Everett S. P. Spain,Major Remi Hajjar
  • ISBN: 0787981931
  • ISBN13: 978-0787981938
  • ePub: 1291 kb | FB2: 1274 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Management & Leadership
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (May 26, 2005)
  • Pages: 92
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 818
  • Format: mbr lrf rtf azw
Leader to Leader, Leadership Breakthroughs from West Point: A Special Supplement, 2005 (J-B Single Issue Leader to Leader) ePub download

The contributors to this special supplement to Leader to Leader are not .

The contributors to this special supplement to Leader to Leader are not as well known, but in our estimation, they are just as exemplary-and their dedication and faithful service to our nation are inspirations. Major Brian Tribus follows up on Crandall's theme in his article, "Making Personal Connections with Your People. Major Todd Woodruff explains how the Army develops commitment even while placing extraordinary demands on solders-demands that take soldiers away from their families and place them in extreme danger.

Leader to Leader (LTL), Leadership Breakthroughs from West Point, A Special Supplement,2005 (J-B Single Issue Leader to Leader) Doug Crandall (Ed., Chip Daniels (Ed., Remi Hajjar (Ed., Colonel Thomas A. Kolditz (Ed., LeBoeuf, Patrick R. Michaelis (Ed., Major Everett S. P. Spain (Ed., Brian Tribus (Ed. Eric J. Weis (Ed., Todd D. Woodruff (Ed. Jossey-Bass, 2005

The Leader to Leader Institute provides intellectual resources to leaders in the business, government, and social sectors, and fosters partnerships across these sectors

The Leader to Leader Institute provides intellectual resources to leaders in the business, government, and social sectors, and fosters partnerships across these sectors. Major Doug Crandall (West Point, NY) teaches the advanced version of West Pointís core leadership course at the . A wonderfully impressive book. It's impressive because of the authors' credentialsóall are leaders in their own rightóand because of their honesty. Rarely will you find more open, self-disclosing discussions of failure, courage, and honor.

Major Doug Crandall is the executive officer to the Dean of the Academic . The Leader to Leader Institute's mission is to strengthen leadership in the social sector. 5 Developing Organizational Values in Others (Chip Daniels). 6 The Authentic High-Impact Leader (Sean T. Hannah).

Major Doug Crandall is the executive officer to the Dean of the Academic Board at the United States Military Academy (. He was previously an assistant professor in the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership, where he served as course director for Leading Organizations Through Change and Advanced Military Leadership and received the Excellence in Teaching Award.

General Kolditz has more than 26 years in leadership roles and 34 years of military service. co-author: Kolditz, Thomas (2005). Leader to Leader, Leadership Breakthroughs from West Point: A Special Supplement. He was also the founding director of the West Point Leadership Center  .

In Extremis Leadership can help all leaders build stronger organizations and a more uplifting society. Brigadier General Thomas A. Kolditz is in a unique position to write about leadership in extreme situations. Henry Cisneros, chairman, City View, and former secretary of the . Department of Housing and Urban Development. The parallels between leading in high-stakes business ventures and leading in dangerous contexts are compelling. Chris C. Casciato, partner, Goldman, Sachs & Company.

A good leader has a futuristic vision and knows how to turn his ideas into real-world success stories. To be an effective leader, you should be confident enough to ensure that other follow your commands. In this article, we take an in-depth look at some of the important leadership qualities that separate good leaders from a bad one. 15 Leadership Qualities That Make Good Leaders. If you are unsure about your own decisions and qualities, then your subordinates will never follow you. As a leader, you have to be oozing with confidence, show some swagger and assertiveness to gain the respect of your subordinates.

Start studying Leadership - Leadership and Management. Burns says Transformational Leadership includes two essential elements: It is relational It deals with real change (thus the 'transforming' focus). Learn vocabulary, terms and more with flashcards, games and other study tools. Transformational leaders change the status quo by appealing to followers' values and sense of higher purpose. transformational leadership characteristics. Identifies common values Is committed Inspires others with vision Has long-term vision - communicates the vision Looks at effects Empowers others - mentors others Is admired and emulated.

We investigated the mediating role of the leader–member exchange (LMX) in the association of abusive supervision . The various styles of administration are referred to, with special emphasis on the need to build up a professional open relationship with the teachers.

We investigated the mediating role of the leader–member exchange (LMX) in the association of abusive supervision and employee work behaviors (task performance and organizational citizenship behaviors toward the organization and individuals). Using data collected from 366 supervisor–subordinate dyads, we found that LMX fully mediated the negative effects of abusive supervision on all three work behaviors. The need for special training to assist principals of educational institutions attain the leadership skills required is expressed.

Leaders have to be able to talk and listen to their employees on all levels of the company.

A third characteristic of great leaders–or, perhaps, group of characteristics–is having courage, tenacity, and patience. Leaders have to be able to talk and listen to their employees on all levels of the company. At the same time, they must have the respect of their employees, the kind of respect that’s earned by being honest, having integrity, and being tough but fair.

Introduction to this Special Supplement on Leadership Breakthroughs from West Point

Leader to Leader has published many outstanding leaders and thinkers—from Peter Drucker, Herb Kelleher, and Rosabeth Moss Kanter to Max De Pree, Margaret Wheatley, and Hugh Price. The contributors to this special supplement to Leader to Leader are not as well known, but in our estimation, they are just as exemplary—and their dedication and faithful service to our nation are inspirations. In this special supplement, we are honored to present articles from Army leaders who teach in the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership at West Point. They are all active duty officers who offer us firsthand accounts of what Army leadership means to them. Although they make references to war, life-and-death decisions, and heroic actions, their real focus is on quiet leadership, mission, values, taking care of people, organizational learning, leading change—and many other topics that cut across all organizations, public and private.

This special supplement is not intended to hold up the U.S. Army as a perfect institution—indeed as you read these pages you will see that these Army leaders and teachers are very much aware of what the Army can do to improve and of what they can do to help lead those improvements. Our intent is simply to hold up the courageous leadership that the Army teaches and practices. May it enlighten and inspire us all.

A Look Ahead

Colonel Thomas Kolditz leads off with his deeply insightful article, “The In Extremis Leader.” In extremis means “at the point of death.” Kolditz has conducted two years of research on leaders who confront situations that are life-threatening, people such as police officers, firefighters, soldiers, and mountain guides. “For those of us who lead professionally,” he writes, “a look at in extremis leadership can be a magnifier, adding clarity and detail to what we already sense—that leaders can make anything possible, and without leadership, even basic tasks can seem insurmountable.”

In “How We Treat Our Foot Soldiers,” Captain Doug Crandall shatters conventional wisdom—uncritically accepted outside the military—about the way foot soldiers are treated by their superiors. Crandall’s account will help open eyes and perhaps give you cause to examine how your organization treats its frontline employees.

Major Brian Tribus follows up on Crandall’s theme in his article, “Making Personal Connections with Your People.” He explains three rules he follows in his own leadership: know what it’s like to be a member of your own organization, control your emotions, and know your people. The rules are simple, but following them demands effort. The payoff, however, can be enormous, as Tribus shows.

Every leader wants followers who are committed to the team and the larger organization. Major Todd Woodruff explains how the Army develops commitment even while placing extraordinary demands on solders—demands that take soldiers away from their families and place them in extreme danger. In “The Power of Caring in Developing Commitment,” Woodruff explains how the Army focuses on families, not individuals, and how this engagement helps generate commitment.

In “Quiet Leadership,” Major Eric Weis portrays leaders who possess the ability to impart a clear intent, who are willing to examine multiple perspectives, who display a humble fortitude, and who have a genuine desire to see their organization perform above expectations. This sort of leadership has the power to achieve almost anything.

In the Army, senior leaders understand that the decisive point of an operation will most likely happen at a time and place far from headquarters. Regardless of how much planning goes into an operation, they know that the people who are actually on the ground as events unfold must make decisions that spell the difference between success and failure. How do senior leaders prepare those on the front line so they make the correct decisions? In his article, “Making Values-Based, Mission-Focused Decisions,” Major Chip Daniels explains the Army’s approach—one that is applicable to civilian organizations as well.

In today’s fast-paced world, leaders in all three sectors realize the importance of building learning organizations. The Army is no exception. As Major Patrick R. Michaelis and Major Everett S. P. Spain write, “The cumulative effect of giving everyone in an organization the capacity to rapidly share near real-time lessons about the competition, situation, and themselves—and then incorporating this capacity into each leader’s individual decision-making cycle, becomes a created comparative advantage.” In their article, “Knowledge Shared Is Power,” they present an innovative, Internet-based knowledge-sharing technology that the Army’s 1st Cavalry Division has deployed in Iraq. Those who think that innovation is best expressed in the private sector will be surprised.

“Army leaders leverage culture,” Major Remi Hajjar writes. “They know why it is important to take time to analyze a unit’s culture and then to form a plan that molds culture to accomplish the institution’s mission.” In “Leveraging Culture to Lead Effectively,” Hajjar shows why the Army’s approach to shaping culture is so powerful and how it can be applied in civilian organizations in all three sectors.

If, like many, you believe that we all have the responsibility to make the world a better place, it means that we all have a responsibility to take action, to lead beyond our formal role in our organizations and communities. In “Leading Beyond Your Formal Sphere of Influence,” Major Everett S. P. Spain explains how he teaches West Point Cadets to do just this. His insights are useful for us all.

In the Epilogue, we are honored to present an interview with Lieutenant General William J. Lennox Jr., the superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. General Lennox’s thoughtful discussion of leadership and leadership development demonstrate that effective leaders never stop learning and growing.

Acknowledgements  

Civilian control of the military is established in the Constitution and deeply embedded in Army doctrine. The Army carries out the decisions of civilian policymakers in the executive branch. Whether we agree or disagree with the political decisions that send the Army off to war, all Americans certainly are profoundly grateful for the dedication and selfless service of those who put their lives on the line in our armed forces. And at the Leader to Leader Institute, we deeply appreciate the West Point contributors to this special supplement of Leader to Leader. Colonel Thomas Kolditz, the head of the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership, was very helpful every step of the way in preparing this special supplement, as was professor Donald Campbell—and we thank them both. We also want to thank Larry Olson, vice president of marketing at John Wiley & Sons, for his inspiration and support in helping us make this special supplement a reality.

Finally, please note that the views expressed in these articles are those of the respective authors and do not reflect the official policy or position of the U.S. Military Academy, the Department of the Army, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. government.

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