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A Year Without Made in China: One Family's True Life Adventure in the Global Economy ePub download

by Sara Bongiorni

  • Author: Sara Bongiorni
  • ISBN: 0470379200
  • ISBN13: 978-0470379202
  • ePub: 1831 kb | FB2: 1900 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: International
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (October 6, 2008)
  • Pages: 256
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 962
  • Format: doc docx mbr lrf
A Year Without Made in China: One Family's True Life Adventure in the Global Economy ePub download

Start by marking A Year Without Made in China: One Family's .

Start by marking A Year Without Made in China: One Family's True Life Adventure in the Global Economy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The best part of this book is when the author looked high and low for a lamp not made in China and finally found one labeled "Made in . Drawing on her years as an award-winning journalist. But when it arrived, one of the parts was labeled "Made in China.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years Drawing on her years as an award-winning journalist, author Sara Bongiorni fills this book with engaging stories and anecdotes of her family's attempt to outrun.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years. Drawing on her years as an award-winning journalist, author Sara Bongiorni fills this book with engaging stories and anecdotes of her family's attempt to outrun China's reach–by boycotting Chinese made products–and does a remarkable job of taking a decidedly big-picture issue and breaking it down to a personal level. Издание: 1. Язык: english.

The Bongiorni family does without sneakers, sunglasses, and printer cartridges, but develops a dogged .

The Bongiorni family does without sneakers, sunglasses, and printer cartridges, but develops a dogged creativity and much needed sense of humor. Themyriad moral complexities in the relationship between American consumers and Chinese factory are evident in each shopping trip. Pietra Rivoli, PhD, Professor, McDonough School of Business, Georgetown University and author, The Travels of a T-Shirt in the Global Economy. In December 2005, author and journalist Sara Bongiorni wrote a short, humorous article chronicling how Chinese manufacturing had reached into every facet of her family's daily life. This obscure article soon became a global phenomenon.

The family's adventure through the maze of modern America's consumer life is. .Those little 'Made in China' labels will never seem the same again.

The family's adventure through the maze of modern America's consumer life is both thought provoking and delightful to read. Mark Fabiani, former White House special counsel and media/political consultant "Breaking up is indeed hard to do, as Sara Bongiorni proves in this winning memoir of her household's one-year boycott of Chinese products. The Bongiorni family does without sneakers, sunglasses, and printer cartridges, but develops a dogged creativity and much needed sense of humor.

The book sounded intriguing. com User, June 28, 2007

The book sounded intriguing. com User, June 28, 2007. In the months since Sara Bongiorni's boycott experiment, checking labels has become a matter of life and death as a result of tainted pet food, poisonous toothpaste, defective tires, and soiled salad. We are all learning to pay more attention to the origin of the products we consume and use.

A Year Without "Made in China": One Family's True Life Adventure in the Global Economy chronicles how Sara . In January 2005, business writer Sara Bongiorni made an unusual New Years resolution.

In January 2005, business writer Sara Bongiorni made an unusual New Years resolution. She's chronicled that experience in a new book, "A Year Without Made in China. Ms. SARA BONGIORNI (Author): At the outset the rule was just avoiding things that had the label Made in China, or if we happened to know that there was a Chinese component in something, we would avoid that too.

Drawing on her years as an award-winning journalist, author Sara Bongiorni fills this book with engaging stories and anecdotes of her family's attempt to outrun China's reach–by boycotting Chinese made products–and does a remarkable job of taking a decidedly big-picture issue an.

Drawing on her years as an award-winning journalist, author Sara Bongiorni fills this book with engaging stories and anecdotes of her family's attempt to outrun China's reach–by boycotting Chinese made products–and does a remarkable job of taking a decidedly big-picture issue and breaking it down to a personal level. Download from free file storage. Скачать с помощью Mediaget.

Sara Bongiorni is a writer and journalist who has worked at news-papers and business publications in California and .

Sara Bongiorni is a writer and journalist who has worked at news-papers and business publications in California and Louisiana. Her beat has included international trade and its impact on local economies. Bongiorni graduated from the University of California, San Diego, and holds a master's degree in journalism from Indiana University.

One Family’s True Life Adventure in the Global Economy. China rules the global market in many sectors, including electronics, clothing, athletic shoes and toys

One Family’s True Life Adventure in the Global Economy. China rules the global market in many sectors, including electronics, clothing, athletic shoes and toys. Cheap labor, a manipulated money supply and state-sponsored subsidies give China a competitive edge in international trade. United States consumers constitute one of China’s largest markets, but the . More than two million American workers have lost positions to China’s industries.

A Year Without "Made in China" provides you with a thought-provoking and thoroughly entertaining account of how the most populous nation on Earth influences almost every aspect of our daily lives. Drawing on her years as an award-winning journalist, author Sara Bongiorni fills this book with engaging stories and anecdotes of her family's attempt to outrun China's reach–by boycotting Chinese made products–and does a remarkable job of taking a decidedly big-picture issue and breaking it down to a personal level.
Gralmeena
The best part of this book is when the author looked high and low for a lamp not made in China and finally found one labeled "Made in U.S.A." But when it arrived, one of the parts was labeled "Made in China." The author called the company that sold it to her, and the guy on the phone told her that Chinese imports had forced American lamp producers out of business and that as a result certain parts could be found only in China.

That was a chilling anecdote, which to me illustrated a powerful reason for a yearlong boycott of Chinese goods. If we don't support alternatives to Chinese products, there will no longer be any alternatives. And if the Chinese products are poorly made, dangerous, bad for the environment or even, eventually, expensive, we're just out of luck!

But while plausible reasons for the boycott were everywhere in recounting of the author's daily life, she was frustratingly unable to clearly articulate, either to her family or to the reader, why she wanted to go without Chinese-made products for a year. When her five-year-old son Wes pressed her on the reasons for the boycott, the best she could muster was: "We want to give other countries a chance to sell us things."

But is it really just about spreading the wealth elsewhere? Or is it about choice? And what about quality and safety, given the pet food melamine scandal and toxic chemicals found in clothing? And then, of course, there's the disposable culture; we buy stuff because it's cheap only to have to replace it a year or two later at additional expense and inconvenience.

During the one-year narrative span of the book stuff all over the house broke: the DVD player, the CD player, the coffee maker. The author whined about the inability to find non-Chinese replacements (aka ones that fit her budget) but never seemed to put together the idea that the extraordinary number of household equipment failures in one year was in fact a great justification not to buy another Chinese one...boycott or not! To me that screamed "isn't there a lesson there? Why is all your stuff breaking?"

Lacking a real articulation of the reasons for the boycott, no wonder the author cheated regularly with the "gift exemption" (the family could get Chinese-made products as gifts) and no wonder she got a lot of flak from her family.

Much of the book, in fact, focused on tension in the author's family over the boycott, including with her husband, Kevin, who she calls "The Weakest Link" but who actually was a fairly good sport. The family interplay quickly became repetitive and I found it frustrating to see no change in the mindset which led her family to be a big buyer of Chinese goods and which mirrors the reasons for our nation's reliance on Chinese goods.

One of the most striking examples of lack of realization of the real issues was that (while she boycotts Wal-Mart for reasons she didn't detail in the book), the author never once questioned her principal choice of shopping venues: the mall, Target and other major big box chains. These are the very retailers responsible for the growth of Made in China. And yet, she calls a little boutique German and Euro shop "snooty" and expresses glee when the store ultimately closes. Even if the salesclerk was snooty to her, does she not mourn that choice, at least for those who liked the store, has narrowed yet again?

And never once, while boycotting Chinese goods, did she "discover" wonderful alternatives with great workmanship. The author sprung for $200 worth of German toys for Christmas (a third of her holiday budget) but she does not appreciate them, and is certain before even wrapping them that her children won't like them. And of course that attitude virtually guarantees they won't.

I understand that the family had a limited budget. But if you want to boycott China, and actually change yourself in the process, you need to live in a different way. That probably means buying a good CD player once that will last you ten years (mine is going on 15), but also going without other things you don't need, like light-up purple pumpkins for Halloween. It might mean thrift-shopping, which was never mentioned even though the family agonized for months over lost sunglasses--even to the point of The Weakest Link wearing a children's pair recovered from a lost-and-found bin. My local thrift store has a plethora of not-embarrassing choices in sunglasses; it also has a rack of decent shoes, another sore point in the book.

The author did sew an inexpensive simple pretty pink tutu for her daughter; it seemed initially a failure (perhaps due to her own lack of conviction?) but the same outfit was later re-requested by her daughter. That seems to me to be a victory and a real change in attitude--and I wish there had been more of it in the book.
Brazil
I finished reading this book just as a large volume of children's toys were being recalled due to excessive amounts of lead in various parts. It struck me as somewhat ironic that the author had such a hard time finding toys that were not made in China and now toys she might have bought, had she not undertaken the boycott, are being recalled.

This book served as a wake up call to me about just how much of the items in our daily life come from China. When you think about it, what would happen if a war broke out and we couldn't get items from China? Do any Americans still know how to make a pair of shoes, and how quickly could they ramp up production to meet demand? This book made me think about how we are putting our eggs into one basket, and how any disruption could cause havoc.

The book was well written and reminded me, yet again, to watch where my dollars flow. I know I will be checking labels more often and choosing another option whenever possible. Maybe if enough of us do so, more manufacturers will be left to fill the void should it be needed. I strongly recommend this book for all consumers.
Silvermaster
An interesting premise, but I wish the author would have taken her research deeper. She would write how she wondered what others thought-but never bothered to ask them and only wrote about her assumptions of what they thought. Even her husband's thoughts were filtered through her. But, if you're looking for a single family's POV book, this is it.
Gozragore
Funny and challenging at the same time. I try not to buy items that say "Made in China" for many reasons, pollution (http://webecoist.momtastic.com/2012/01/10/water-colors-10-unnaturally-dyed-polluted-rivers/) , the quality is inferior and what is made in China takes away American jobs. It is not always easy to find items made in America and this easy read tells the sometimes frustrating story about consciously not buying "made in China".
Rasmus
While most of us are tearing around trying to find the best deal for the cheapest price, this author sought to find these deals without buying anything made in China. You already know that this will be difficult; she was stymied at every item, it seemed. The one item that I remember she finally gave in to was a pair of shoes for her child. Made in Italy for $94.00, We all know that is no bargain; however, most of us do not know how to solve this conundrum.
Happy Holidays.
Foxanayn
*****
This book is about one family's experience boycotting all items made in China. It is written in a humorous (sometimes hilarious) style, and is as entertaining as a novel. The author, Sara Bongiorni, is a journalist, and it was she that initiated the boycott in her family, with the rest of the family (her husband, and two children) participating with various amounts of enthusiasm---this is part of what makes the story so good.

As you read, you may find yourself surprised, as I was, how much China produces products sold in America. The author learns a lot during her boycott, and the reader learns right along with her. It is inspirational too---it at least makes you think about whether or not you would or could do this! At any rate, readers cannot help but become more conscious consumers after reading the book.

You don't need to care at all about this topic before you read the book; it's a good story, and you'll like it either way. I bought it as a gift for a friend and ended up reading it (I couldn't put it down) before I gave it to her.

One of the reviewers on the back cover says "You'll never go shopping the same way again!" and this is certainly true for me.

Highly recommended.
*****
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