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The End of the Nation State: The Rise of Regional Economies ePub download

by Kenichi Ohmae

  • Author: Kenichi Ohmae
  • ISBN: 0684825287
  • ISBN13: 978-0684825281
  • ePub: 1484 kb | FB2: 1190 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: International
  • Publisher: Free Press (May 15, 1996)
  • Pages: 224
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 773
  • Format: docx mbr lrf lit
The End of the Nation State: The Rise of Regional Economies ePub download

Nation states, asserts the world-renowned business strategist Kenichi Ohmae, are dinosaurs waiting to die. In this profoundly important book Ohmae argues that not only have nation states lost their ability to control exchange.

Nation states, asserts the world-renowned business strategist Kenichi Ohmae, are dinosaurs waiting to die. In this profoundly important book Ohmae argues that not only have nation states lost their ability to control exchange rates and protect their currencies, but they no longer generate real economic activity. Nation states, asserts the world-renowned business strategist Kenichi Ohmae, are dinosaurs waiting to die.

5 to 20 million persons, possibly crossing national boundaries, represent the natural unit of economic growth, enjoying economies of scale in services (. advertising) but too small to entertain delusions of self-sufficiency in anything. The economic action of the future, says Ohmae, will be in such regional clusters, spreading economic benefits to their neighboring regions. In this profoundly important book Ohmae argues that not only have nation states lost their ability to control exchange rates and protect their currencies, but they no longer generate.

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In this work, Ohmae argues that not only have nation states lost their ability to control exchange rates and protect their currencies, but because .

In this work, Ohmae argues that not only have nation states lost their ability to control exchange rates and protect their currencies, but because they no longer generate real economic activity, they have forfeited their role as critical participants in the global economy. The result, Ohmae claims, has been the rise of the region state, the natural economic zones that have emerged, for example, between Hong Kong and the Chinese mainland.

The End of the Nation State: The Rise of Regional Economies. New York: The Free Press, 1995. 1 Ohmae’s book at this and other junctures supplies supporting evidence to many of Guehenno’s sweeping, but only briefly elaborated, observations.

That's not quite true. That's not quite true.

Enter Zip Code or city, state. Error: Please enter a valid ZIP code or city and state. Good news - You can still get free 2-day shipping, free pickup, & more. As a result, he maintains, they have "already" forfeited their role as critical participants in the global economy.

By losing their ability to control exchange rates and protect their currencies, nation states, assers Ohmae, have forfeited their role as critical participants in the global economy. Ohmae contends that five great forces have usurped the economic power once held by the nation state, resulting in the rise of region states which have closer links to the global economy than to their "host" nations.
Nilador
There are times in human history where great events come into play. We are in the midst of such an event where fundamental change is being demanded. The old world, dominated by the nation state, is now a barrier to the new business and social world that is opening up. Kenichi Ohmae has spotted the trends. The big question facing us is: will the old die gracefully or will it have to be booted out? I suspect it won't go gracefully.

Good thinking.
Cia
Nation states going away anytime soon? I doubt it. While the author makes a good argument, lots of evidence found elsewhere puts doubt in the presented theory. Very good book on globalization issues.
Thundershaper
Purchased for a faculty member and I received no complaints.
Cordalas
This is an eye opener. I wish that I had read this 1995 book book sooner. Not due to supra national governance like UN and EU, but economic growth is being controlled by regional economies like Silicon value not regulated or subsidized by a central government.

He suggests that the economic ideas of economist J.M. Keynes are obsolete and the more modern writings of Paul Krugman are mistaken because of nation state orientation. He concentrates on Japan, which characterizes as hardening of economic arteries with economic areas slowed by aid from Tokyo as central governments follow a policy of taking from successful areas to prop up failures.

He suggests that only viable government organization is a federation. (The USA rejected the idea in 1865 and seems to be moving towards centralization.) Maybe that's Ohmae's point and why he concentrates on Japan. He doesn't clarify the roles of EU and NAFTA are not clear. USA has tried and failed to accommodate global trends with deregulation.

The book ends with accounts of economic success in Singapore and New Zealand. Appendix A looks like a very useful article showing that interest rates and inflation are secondary to FX rates. Unfortunately, it may be that it can only be understood by Ohmae and George Soros.

The book is very convincing and should be updated. Now in 2013 it seems that we are progressing in the direction predicted by Ohmae although national states will continue to exert influence, or is it restrictions, in the foreseeable future.
Rocksmith
The title suggests that nation states and government in general are things of the past, a world-scale right-wing libertarian vision come to life. That's not quite true. Now 5 years after this book was written, in so many ways, the world either already is what Ohmae said it will be, or it is well on its way. The "End" is not so much a dissolution of national governments, but their growing irrelevance. Fewer and fewer consumers still regard Honda and Toyota as Japanese car manufacturers because so much of their assembly and even machining is now performed in the USA. If Motorola sells portable phones to Japan it does not necessarily benefit Americans, because the phones might be manufactured in Indonesia. The shareholders and other departments of the company might benefit because of new business generated, but it is possible that all employees and shareholders come from Asia or Europe themselves, even if Motorola was originally established in the US.
The nation state might last through the end of this lifetime (though unlikely longer than that), but it is less and less an economic entity, rather a final vestige of nationalistic sentiments, the modern and future "opium of the masses." Ohmae reminds us that terms like GDP and GNP are outdated and deserve reconsideration, considering that every large nation state has successful enterprises spaced out among uncompetitive industries and unproductive locales. Gross "Regional" Product might be a more accurate yardstick.
A good companion book to this one might be "Jihad vs. McWorld" by Benjamin Barber. That book emphasises that the so-called Transnational Corporations might as well be called anti-national corporations. Consumers scarcely know or care where the banks and manufacturers who provide them with goods and services call home, and the corporations care even less about the nationality of their customers, beyond the point that it might provide information about their purchasing habits.
Malalanim
Ohmae has brilliantly managed to explain in a crystal clear way how the political and economic structures of mankind are starting to experience an impressive change. The book is very revealing in terms of how globalisation is already reshaping the way people interact, making national states unnecessary, costly and counterproducing, as they have just become obstacles in today's world. Ohmae has said in easy words what we all (in favour or against) knew or suspected but couldn't put so clearly: that what he calls "the world according to the United Nations", that colourful political map we all learnt in school, full of borders and flags representing different cultures, levels of income, geopolitical interests, etc., is simply over. With the end of national states comes a new and exciting era when individuals and their spontaneous order, their free associations and their voluntary alliances are important, not any longer the opinions, positions or decisions of government bureaucrats and politicians. With globalisation comes freedom to an extent we humans have no historic precedents for. This logically causes fear among all brands of right-wing or left-wing collectivists and, especially, among that chaste of elegant leaders living on our coerced tax-paying.
Yainai
This is another book that seems more useful for people in 2015 than when it is written. A lot of good information about changes in balance of power between Regional Economies and Nation States. Foreshadows some of the recent cases where local laws begin to trump national ones. Not quite the Anarchist wet dream that some people think it is from reading the title, but definitely worth the read.
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