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Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future ePub download

by Bill McKibben

  • Author: Bill McKibben
  • ISBN: 1851685766
  • ISBN13: 978-1851685769
  • ePub: 1354 kb | FB2: 1996 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Economics
  • Publisher: Oneworld Publications (April 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 272
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 759
  • Format: txt mbr mobi rtf
Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future ePub download

Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future is a non-fiction work by environmentalist Bill McKibben published in the field of ecological economics in 2007.

Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future is a non-fiction work by environmentalist Bill McKibben published in the field of ecological economics in 2007. The work promoted sustainable economy in close-knit communities. These include regions that generate their own food, their own energy, their own culture, and their own entertainment. McKibben was interviewed by Salon.

I'd like to see Deep Economy read in every Econ 101 class. Bill McKibben works on the frontiers of new understandings and returns with his startling and lucid revelations of the possible future. Bill McKibben asks the central human question: What is the economy for? The stakes here are terrifyingly high, but with his genial style and fascinating examples of alternative approaches, McKibben convinces me that economics is anything but dismal-if only we can learn to do it right! ―Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickel and Dimed. A saner human-scale world does exist-just over the horizon-and McKibben introduces us to the people and ideas leading us there.

McKibben offers a realistic, if challenging, scenario for a hopeful future. The Wealth of Communities. 129. The Durable Future

McKibben offers a realistic, if challenging, scenario for a hopeful future. The Durable Future.

Bill McKibben asks the central human question: What is the economy for? The stakes here are terrifyingly high, but with his genial style and fascinating examples of alternative approaches, McKibben convinces me that economics is anything but dismal-if only we can learn to do it right!" -Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickel and Dimed.

Bill McKibben works our damaged planet Earth through a dimension of time reversal and what might be called the . Actually, McKibben’s aim in Deep Economy is relatively modest - to change minds, to present a new mental model of the possible. It’s a good time to try.

Bill McKibben works our damaged planet Earth through a dimension of time reversal and what might be called the physics of Christian beatitude: The future shall be made past, and the big shall be made small; the global shall be restored to the local; the harm may be undone, the seas may recede, the temperatures may drop, the hurricanes may abate and humanity. may be returned to its happier mind. At least, we should steer ourselves in that direction.

The key to change is local. Part 4: The Wealth of Communities. Interesting, in this chapter, McKibben talks about a small radio station. When Congress "deregulated" radio and ended the "fairness doctrine," the change was dramatic.

Bill McKibben's wonderful book Deep Economy first opened my eyes to some of the staggering statistics regarding the international agriculture industry

Bill McKibben's wonderful book Deep Economy first opened my eyes to some of the staggering statistics regarding the international agriculture industry. It now requires more energy to grow and ship our food than we are ingesting into our bodies. For example, according to McKibben, 'The Swedish Food Institute. discovered that growing and distributing a pound of frozen peas required 10 times as much energy as the peas contained. A pound of grapes flown in from Chile effectively gives off six pounds of carbon dioxide

Deep Economy - Bill McKibben. The wealth of communities and the durable future.

Deep Economy - Bill McKibben. The bestselling author of The End of Nature issues an impassioned call to arms for an economy that creates community and ennobles our lives. In this powerful and provocative manifesto, Bill McKibben offers the biggest challenge in a generation to the prevailing view of our economy. For the first time in human history, he observes, more is no longer synonymous with better-indeed, for many of us, they have become almost opposites.

Bill McKibben asks the central human question: What is the economy "for"? The stakes here are terrifyingly high, but with his genial style and fascinating examples of alternative approaches, McKibben convinces me that economics is anything but dismal- if only we can learn to do it right!"-

Bill McKibben asks the central human question: What is the economy "for"? The stakes here are terrifyingly high, but with his genial style and fascinating examples of alternative approaches, McKibben convinces me that economics is anything but dismal- if only we can learn to do it right!"- Barbara Ehrenreich, author of "Nickel and Dimed" "The cult of growth and globalization has seldom been so effectively challenged as by Bill McKibben in "Deep Economy," But this bracing tonic of a book also throws the bright light of McKibben's matchless journali.

Deep Economy" may be the most disturbing and challenging book published this year. For example, one of McKibben's key arguments against economic growth is that economic growth will overuse energy, increase global warming, and damage various natural economic systems. Disturbing? It's like the doctor telling you that you have cancer.

Ffrlel
This book succeeds in identifying and drawing out a very large problem for our current world: our obsession with more and faster economic growth. What it does not do is provide a clear answer to this problem. After finishing the book, I realized the author did not intend this as a how to manual for solving this problem, so he didn't fail in that sense. He does suggest that local economies will help us resolve our myriad problems, and with that I agree. But the book leaves the reader wondering, "How do we persuade the rest of our society to change course?" The author also states very clearly at a few points that he believes this renaissance of small, local economies will not result from any deliberate plan, but rather from the coalescence of thousands of individual and undirected efforts. Of course, that statement left me wondering, "Then why am I even reading this book?"

But I enjoyed this book.The author provides interesting information and his bibliography provided me with a good number of sources to follow up on for further study. This might be the book's greatest strength for the already converted. His anecdotal stories are refreshing and provide good perspective. All in all, the book was worth the time it took to read it. But, other than tidbits, this book didn't provide me with any significant new insights. Rather, it's more of a motivational and inspirational effort. For that reason, I think this book is best suited to the curious but unconverted. Those who have questions but still buy into the old dogmas that economic growth is our preeminent concern, that in order to feed the world we must continue with more and greater genetically modified food production, and that we need to continue mining the earth for every last mineral resource. This book could be to those folks what "Crunchy Cons" was to me some years back.

This book is not a deep analysis of certain key problems. Rather, it is a survey of a handful of issues and introduces readers to big concepts. In that role I thought it did very well. However, while the author spends a fair amount of time discussing food independence (perhaps the second or third most important theme in the book behind energy and human satisfaction), he never mentions permaculture. He really goes no further than saying that more intensely managed farmland can produce more food per acre than our current industrial mono-cropping models. While permaculture has gained in popularity quite substantially since this book's publication, it wasn't unknown at the time he wrote the book. So it's suprising that he never mentions it. And I think it's unfortunate that he doesn't even alert readers to the power of permaculture design. For anyone interested, the internet is rife with information on permaculture. (Start by Googling Geoff Lawton or Ben Falk.) But suffice it to say that, in keeping with the spirit of local food economies, a permaculture approach to food production provides more potential for stability and sustainability than any other agricultural model found around the globe. This seems like a substantial oversight in this book, despite it's many other good qualities.

To summarize, this book is interesting and encouraging. If you're already of a mind that local economies that provide more local stability are the future, this book may be redundant but still worthwhile. If you're not sure what you think or are looking for an alternative to the unquestioning "more efficiency and economic production" mantra of the mainstream political personalities of today, check this book out. And especially if you consider yourself a conservative who is increasingly non-plussed with the Republican party, give this book a considered and thorough read. You needn't agree with everything, but the underlying premises are spot on.
Macill
Bill McKibben is a master story teller of the greatest crisis of our time. In Deep Economy, he presents a convincing argument that local economies are much more sustainable than global ones, not only because it uses less resources, but also because it makes us happier. He summarizes research on the benefits of communities, and tells personal stories of eating and living locally. I greatly enjoyed his observations of his trips to Cuba and China, one which has created a sustainable local agriculture, and one that is growing so fast it can hardly keep up. He illuminates both the benefits and drawbacks of economic growth in the developing world. He shows clearly that more isn't better, but that local economies produce the most wealth by using resources most efficiently and by providing a sense of place.
Kuve
There are practical things that people are doing to make a living and save the environment at the same time. The last part of the book is the best with examples of appropriate technology and independent people in the third world solving their problems without the largess of the great white father. The author is not blind to our present difficulties but he stresses that by simply changing our point of view we can do a lot to save our world without wearing hair shirts or sleeping on cold gravel beds. Buy it and givie to your local school and library.
Lanin
For most of human history, "more" and "better" have been pretty much the same when it comes to the things we want. Even today, a very large number of people live in poverty, and their main priority is more -- more food, more clothing, more medical care, more things. For them, "more" would still be "better."

But, for many of us, we have long ago passed the point where "more" is the same as "better." Every study that has looked at the correlation between wealth and happiness finds the same thing. Up to a certain point, more money make people happier. After a certain point, however, more money stops making us happier. Many of us are long past that point. McKibben starts with this observation, but then he moves further.

According to McKibben, our wealthy modern lifestyle is actually starting to make us less happy. We are social creatures, and living alone in massive houses, traveling in separate cars and the other things money tends to buy these days tend to isolate us from other people. This makes us less happy, in the end, not more.

And, finally, our lifestyle is less and less sustainable. Our food supply, for example, is highly dependent on cheap oil. While this has worked for a while, it cannot work forever. The demand for oil -- and other limited resources -- will grow spectacularly as some of those in poverty start to adopt some of our way of life. And that is so, even if population stops growing.

I found this book deeply disturbing, but I think McKibben is right about the problems he identifies. McKibben, however, is not so pessimistic. He thinks there are solutions that will allow us to live even happier lives by consuming less, not more. I sincerely hope that he is right, and that more people at least listen to what he has to say.
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