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The Real Thing: Truth and Power at the Coca-Cola Company ePub download

by Constance L. Hays

  • Author: Constance L. Hays
  • ISBN: 0375505628
  • ISBN13: 978-0375505621
  • ePub: 1102 kb | FB2: 1142 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Biography & History
  • Publisher: Random House; 1 edition (February 3, 2004)
  • Pages: 416
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 828
  • Format: lrf azw rtf mobi
The Real Thing: Truth and Power at the Coca-Cola Company ePub download

By 1920, the Coca-Cola Company’s success depended on a unique partnership with a group of independent .

By 1920, the Coca-Cola Company’s success depended on a unique partnership with a group of independent bottlers. Together, they had made Coke not just a soft drink but an element of our culture. But the company, intent on controlling everything about Coke, did all it could to dismantle that partnership. In its reach for power, it was more than willing to gamble the past

Constance L Hays's The Real Thing is a critical corporate history of Coca Cola which among other things subtly . She tries to make this book about the personalities behind Coca-Cola.

Constance L Hays's The Real Thing is a critical corporate history of Coca Cola which among other things subtly shows how Coca Cola has subverted Black Power, civil rights, and working class empowerment in Atlanta. They do this by using corporate diversity to suppress people of color workers who try to rise up against discrimination in their company. The great men who dynamism and energy transformed the beverage from drug store treat to everyday addiction. Alas, her efforts fall flat; as do her 6,025 soda metaphors.

By 1920, the Coca-Cola Company’s success depended on a unique partnership with a group of independent .

By 1920, the Coca-Cola Company’s success depended on a unique partnership with a group of independent bottlers. In its reach for power, it was more than willing to gamble the past

Coca-Cola is - to run with an overused word - iconic. Was there such a thing as too much Coke? The thought had never occurred to Iverson or Coca-Cola.

Coca-Cola is - to run with an overused word - iconic. It was also the perfect metaphor for commercial colonisation that replaced fascism after the second world war, being pleasing, popular and representative of a lot more than met the eye. Before globalisation became a dirty word, Coca-Cola stood for the best of American values: it was cheap and convenient, universal and democratic.

The Real Thing: Truth and Power at the Coca-Cola Company. The Real Thing - Constance L. Hays. by Constance L. The Real Thing is a portrait of America’s most famous product and the men who transformed it from mere soft drink to symbol of freedom. The story, starting with Coke’s creation after the Civil War and continuing with its domination of the domestic and worldwide soft-drink business, is a uniquely American tale of opportunity, hope, teamwork, and love, as well as salesmanship, hubris, ambition, and greed.

Truth and Power at the Coca-Cola Company. New York Times reporter Hays, who covered the company for five years, ably makes the point that there’s no comparison for the emotional connection that people in America and around the world have with a Coke

Truth and Power at the Coca-Cola Company. New York Times reporter Hays, who covered the company for five years, ably makes the point that there’s no comparison for the emotional connection that people in America and around the world have with a Coke. Aiming in her booklength debut for a social history of the beverage and those who built a corporation around it, Hays initially seems to be taking a rather haphazard approach, jumping from the 1990s, when the Coca-Cola Company was at the pinnacle of its power, back to the late-19th century, when Coke was just another of the syrups that. The Coca-Cola Company was 108 years old on the morning that Ivester set off for Rome, and it was already the biggest soft-drink company in the world. Nineteen ninety-four was its greatest year yet. People drank Coca-Cola morning, noon, and night in the United States, where Coke had gotten started.

Coca-Cola has become such a ubiquitous American symbol such that it's often hard to distinguish where mere substance . I thought the book did a great job at giving the reader an idea of the mindset of Coca Cola. I will never look at a Coke the same way ever again

Coca-Cola has become such a ubiquitous American symbol such that it's often hard to distinguish where mere substance ends (its formula is a secret as closely held. I will never look at a Coke the same way ever again. o) The book wasn't afraid to talk about the good and the bad about Coca Cola as well as it's strong and weak sides. Coca-Cola Unexpected Summer. com User, May 17, 2004.

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A definitive history of Coca-Cola, the world’s best-known brand, by a New York Times reporter who has followed the company and who brings fresh insights to the world of Coke, telling a larger story about American business and cultureThe Real Thing is a portrait of America’s most famous product and the men who transformed it from mere soft drink to symbol of freedom. The story, starting with Coke’s creation after the Civil War and continuing with its domination of the domestic and worldwide soft-drink business, is a uniquely American tale of opportunity, hope, teamwork, and love, as well as salesmanship, hubris, ambition, and greed. By 1920, the Coca-Cola Company’s success depended on a unique partnership with a group of independent bottlers. Together, they had made Coke not just a soft drink but an element of our culture. But the company, intent on controlling everything about Coke, did all it could to dismantle that partnership. In its reach for power, it was more than willing to gamble the past.Constance L. Hays examines a century of Coca-Cola history through the charismatic, driven men who used luck, spin, and the open door of enterprise to turn a beverage with no nutritional value into a remedy, a refreshment, and the world’s best-known brand. The story of Coke is also a catalog of carbonation, soda fountains, dynastic bottling businesses, global expansion, and outsize promotional campaigns, including New Coke, one of the greatest marketing debacles of all time. By examining relationships at all levels of the company, The Real Thing reveals the psyche of a great American corporation and how it shadows all business, for better or worse.This is as much a story about America as it is the tale of a great American product, one recognized all over the world. Under the leadership of Roberto Goizueta and Doug Ivester, Coca-Cola reinvented itself for investors, spearheading trends such as lavish executive salaries and the wooing of Wall Street, but when Coke’s great global ambitions ran into trouble, it had difficulty getting back on track. The Real Thing is a journey through the soft-drink industry, from the corner office to the vending machine. It is also a social history in which sugared water becomes an international object of consumer desire—and the messages poured upon an eager public gradually obscure the truth.
Quphagie
Before reading this I had no idea there even was a Coca Cola empire. I suppose that if you lived in Atlanta, Coke's headquarters, you could not have avoided knowing this; for the rest of us, it's surprising. Now, let me describe what I mean by empire. The head of an empire has absolute power, and the reach of an empire is the entire world. That describes, or at least did describe, Coke. Even bringing in a soft drink from another company could you fired.

It all started with the president of the Coke company making lots of money selling syrup to soda fountains, which blinded him to the possibility of selling it any other way. Two businessmen came to him asking to bottle Coca Cola. He didn't see this as having much impact on his business, so he gave them a fixed price on syrup to the end of time, and a domain of almost the entire U.S. After they tried bottling Coca Cola they found it to be hard and dirty work, so they decided to franchise it out, and sell the syrup to their franchises at a profit. This started a real war between Coke and the bottlers.

I also found out that New Coke was only the latest change to the formula. I had assumed that the syrup formula was fixed, and had been forever, but apparently not. Now, that would not be a big deal, except that if Coke was able to call changing the recipe from using sugar to using high fructose corn syrup a new product, they would no longer be bound by the fixed price contract that had been frustrating them for so long.

The battles and the egos portrayed in "The Real Thing" makes this a page-turner, even though the book is non-fiction, and even though you already know the broad outlines before you even start reading it. That's quite an accomplishment.
Tiainar
There appear to be three types of books that are commonly written about the Coca-Cola Company (NYSE symbol: KO): (1) official company histories that have been approved by management; (2) nostalgic books that focus on the company's early history and/or the numerous "antiques" and souvenirs that it has produced over time, and (3) objective histories that dig below the press releases for the real story of this remarkable company. This book falls squarely within the third category.

While it provides a quick view of Coke's early years, it focuses upon the reigns of Roberto Goizueta and Douglas Ivestor, who between them managed to get the company into the predicaments it faces today, Goizueta by focusing solely upon upping the stock price and Ivester by creating Coca-Cola Enterprises, the creature that would destroy the company's base of loyal bottlers while allowing manipulation of the financial statements of both companies. (It should be noted that Ivester was responsible for numerous other screw-ups, but CCE was the major one.) Both executives came away with enormous amounts of benefits upon their respective terminations (more than a billion dollars in the case of Goizueta, who died before he could enjoy it).

Another review of this book descrtibes it as a "mundane history." I disagree -- it clearly descibes the arrogance, rigidity and incompetence that plague the company to this day. Ms. Hays' description of the financial machinations that went into making both KO and CCE appear more successful than they actually were is especially fine. While she doesn't go into the accounting fine points, she does provide a clear trail for those wishing to do so.

Although carrying a copyright date of 2004, the book ends at the end of 2002 with the appointment of Steve Heyer, an outsider, as president. When the time came to replace Doug Daft as chairman and CEO, the board overlooked the highly competent Heyer, choosing instead Neville Isdell, a long-time employee not known for his breadth of vision. Heyer promptly resigned.

Some things never change.
Kazigrel
Douglas Ivester may have been the top Number 2 in U.S. corporate history. Yet his disastrous tenure as CEO of Coke shows once again why the winners of the Best Supporting Actor don't necessarily all go on to be top stars. Some people who are invaluable in the second chair prove to lack what it takes to run the show.
Roberto Goizueta who led Coke to unprecedented riches was the first executive of an established Fortune 500 company to become a billionaire. The handpicked successor of Robert W. Woodruff drove the price of Coke stock to new highs. Goizueta died unexpectedly in 1997 and Ivester assumed the reins of the Coca-Cola Company.
The Real Thing is a book that is promoted as a history of an American institution. It is not. It is a tale told more from Ivester's perspective than any other. As such it gives too much credit to Ivester for the success of the Goizueta Era and too little blame for the rapid collapse during Ivester's tenure.
On the whole, it is a disappointing and mislabeled business school case study.
Framokay
Great book, I loved it and read it in just a few hours. Maybe I've always been more of a fan of Coca-Cola than I had thought.
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