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Social Order and the Fear of Crime in Contemporary Times (Clarendon Studies in Criminology) ePub download

by Stephen D. Farrall,Jonathan Jackson,Emily Gray

  • Author: Stephen D. Farrall,Jonathan Jackson,Emily Gray
  • ISBN: 0199540810
  • ISBN13: 978-0199540815
  • ePub: 1485 kb | FB2: 1928 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (December 13, 2009)
  • Pages: 200
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 238
  • Format: lrf lrf docx txt
Social Order and the Fear of Crime in Contemporary Times (Clarendon Studies in Criminology) ePub download

The fear of crime has been recognized as an important social problem in its own right, with a significant number of citizens in many countries . Series: Clarendon Studies in Criminology. Hardcover: 200 pages.

The fear of crime has been recognized as an important social problem in its own right, with a significant number of citizens in many countries concerned about crime.

Questions relating to the fear of crime were one of the only consistent elements of the 1982–94 BCS sweeps .

Questions relating to the fear of crime were one of the only consistent elements of the 1982–94 BCS sweeps (Mayhew 1996: 48). Several studies undertaken in the USA, Australia and in mainland Europe also testify to these rates of anxiety. For example, studies in Holland (Van der Wurff et al. 1989), Slovenia (Mesko and Farrall 2000), Switzerland (Killias and Clerici 2000: 439–40) as well as those studies undertaken in the UK (referred to above) have frequently demonstrated the fear of crime to be a common experience amongst those surveyed.

Stephen D. Farrall, Jonathan Jackson, and Emily Gray. Clarendon Studies in Criminology. Examines the different social attitudes and backgrounds of those who fear crime and explores whether there is more than one social norm of the fear of crime. Farrall (author), Jonathan Jackson (author), Emily Gray . Farrall (author), Jonathan Jackson (author), Emily Gray (author). Hardback 340 Pages, Published: 01/10/2009. The fear of crime has been recognized as an important social problem in its own right, with a significant number of citizens in many countries concerned about crime.

A Rhetorical Question with No One Clear Answer; 4: Theorising the Fear of Crime: The Cultural and Social Significance of Insecurity; Part II; 5: Conversations about Crime, P.

by Stephen Farrall, Jonathan Jackson, Emily Gray.

E Gray, J Jackson, S Farrall. European Journal of Criminology 5 (3), 363-380, 2008.

S Farrall, J Jackson, E Gray. Oxford University Press, 2009. J Jackson, B Bradford. British Journal of Sociology 60 (3), 493-521, 2009. A psychological perspective on vulnerability in the fear of crime. E Gray, J Jackson, S Farrall. Europeans and biotechnology in 2010: winds of change? G Gaskell, S Stares, A Allansdottir, N Allum, P Castro, J Jackson. Publications Office of the European Union, 2010.

Published 2009 by Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Emily Gray, Jonathan Jackson and Stephen Farrall Reassessing the .

Emily Gray, Jonathan Jackson and Stephen Farrall Reassessing the fear of crime Article (Accepted version) (Refereed) Original citation: Gray, Emily and Jackson, Jonathan and Farrall, Stephen (2008) Reassessing the fear of crime. European journal of criminology, 5 (3). pp. 363-380. Old questions ask about a more general model of experience (‘How worried 5 are you.

The fear of crime has been recognized as an important social problem in its own right, with a significant number of citizens in many countries concerned about crime. In this book, the authors critically review the main findings from over 35 years of research into attitudes to crime, highlighting groups who are most fearful of crime and exploring the theories used to account for that fear. Using this research, the authors move on to propose a new model for the fear of crime, arguing that such methods, which involve intensity questions (such as 'how worried are you about x ...'), may actually conflate an 'expressive' or 'attitudinal' component of the fear of crime with an experiential component and therefore fail to provide a comprehensive insight into how crime is perceived. Taking an entirely new approach to their subject, the authors use existing quantitative data from the British Crime Survey to pose theoretically informed questions to help identify those who only 'expressively' fear crime, separating them from those who have the actual experience of worrying about crime. By exploring the extent to which each group has different social attitudes and backgrounds, and whether there is more than one social/cultural form of the fear of crime, this innovative and exciting title promises to reposition this aspect of criminology to a more prominent place.
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