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The Lives to Come: the Genetic Revolution and Human Possibilities ePub download

by Philip Kitcher

  • Author: Philip Kitcher
  • ISBN: 0684800551
  • ISBN13: 978-0684800554
  • ePub: 1470 kb | FB2: 1993 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Science & Mathematics
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; First Edition edition (February 15, 1996)
  • Pages: 384
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 872
  • Format: rtf lit mbr docx
The Lives to Come: the Genetic Revolution and Human Possibilities ePub download

Could widespread use of genetic tests lead to new forms of discrimination in insurance, employment, and how people are viewed by society? How can genetic knowledge improve law enforcement while protecting the rights of the innocent?

Philip Kitcher's The Lives to Come is a thorough, nuanced look at the moral and social issues surrounding new genetic technologies

Philip Kitcher's The Lives to Come is a thorough, nuanced look at the moral and social issues surrounding new genetic technologies.

Thomas Kuhn's book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions has probably been more widely read-and more widely misinterpreted-than any other book in the recent philosophy of science. The broad circulation of his views has generated a popular caricature of Kuhn's position. The American paperback contains a postscript on cloning, almost identical with his article "Whose Self is it, Anyway?.

The Lives to Come book.

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Readers who are interested in the science of the genetics revolution will find answers here, but there are no easy answers to the social and ethical issues it raises

Readers who are interested in the science of the genetics revolution will find answers here, but there are no easy answers to the social and ethical issues it raises. Kitcher lays out the territory and makes it clear that failing to explore it would be folly. THE LIVES TO COME: The Genetic Revolution and Human Possibilities.

Bibliographic Citation. Issues: In Science and Technology 1996 Fall; 13(1): 85-87. Kitcher, Philip (1996). Related Items in Google Scholar. Весь DSpace Сообщества и коллекции Авторы Названия By Creation Date Эта коллекция Авторы Названия By Creation Date.

Abortion, it would seem, would save such a soul from eternal damnation and would be the only humane thing to do.

In The Lives to Come: The Genetic Revolution and Human Possibilities, Philip Kitcher takes a shot at several aspects of eugenics without ever really coming to grips empirically with the data; but he does a fair job of bringing forth relevant issues that need to be debated from all perspectives. Kitcher sounds the alarm with regard to disability activists who are fearful that terminating pregnancies because of genetic disease will "worsen the plight of those who are born with conditions, both through the withdrawal of support and through loss of respect. Abortion, it would seem, would save such a soul from eternal damnation and would be the only humane thing to do.

Human genetics-Popular works, 2. Human Genome Project-Popular works. THE: LIVES TO COME ketonuria (PKU), a disease which if left untreated leads to severe mental retardation. 3. Genetic engineering-Moral and ethical aspects. K54 1997 59. 3'5-dc21 97-17314 CIP ISBN 0-684-80055-1 0-684-82705-0 (Pbk). 3 ToTest or Not to Test? Forewarned is sometimes forearmed. Until very recently, the tests looked for high lev- els of the amino acid phenylalanine in a baby's blood. and although early versions of the tests could yield false positives, advances in our knowledge of the underlying genes now permit extremely accurate diagnosis.

The Genetic Revolution and Human Possibilities by Philip Kitcher, he takes a shot at several aspects of eugenics without ever really coming to grips empirically with the data, but does a fair job of bringing forth relevant issues that need to be debated from all perspectives. Kitcher sounds the alarm with regards to disability activists who are fearful that terminating pregnancies because of genetic disease will "worsen the plight of those who are born with conditions, both through the withdrawal of support and through loss of respect.

Addressing the moral, social, and political questions raised by the Human Genome Project, a scientific and philosophical study considers such areas as genetic therapy, genetic discrimination, and abortion
Skyway
Published approximately a decade ago, this book remains a clear, coherent discussion of the potential implications of genetic testing. Kitcher concentrates on genetic testing and 'negative eugenics,' the concept that prenatal testing can be used to reduce disease causing alleles. He also discusses other aspects of genetic knowledge, such as employment discrimination and similar topics. To his credit, Kitcher had a fairly realistic preception of the likely consequences of increased genetic knowledge and The Lives To Come avoids some of the more outre topics, such as enhancing human capacity, in favor of discussing more likely outcomes as increased prenatal testing. Kitcher also stresses that much genetic research is driven by the desire to understand disease processes with the hope of discovering non-eugenic, more traditionally medical interventions.

Because of the nature of the topic, he has to discuss emotionally loaded topics like abortion, fetal personhood, etc. He comes down on the side of a carefully qualified program of 'utopian' eugenics which permits access to abortion along with a strong commitment to aid families who decide to avoid abortion, and a good measure of careful public education. His discussions of a variety of topics are generally careful, thoughtful, consistent, and moderate in tone.

Its interesting to read this book in light of recent developments. Kitcher was conservative in terms of estimating what could would be learned about genetics of disease and human genetics in general. Sequencing of human and other species genomes, and the application of this knowledge has proceeded faster than he (and many others) anticipated. If anything, the development of better sequencing methods and other technologies will probably accelerate understanding of human genetic disorders in the next couple of decades. At the same time, there has been relatively little progress in converting this knowledge into more traditional medical approaches. With prenatal and other genetic testing gradually expanding, we are entering the era of eugenics that Kitcher (and many others) anticipated.

The social response, however, has not, at least in the USA, what Kitcher reasoned was appropriate. Kitcher argued well that just use of this technology would probably require some sort of universal health care guarantee, universal access to genetic testing, and a commitment to provision of services to families foregoing testing. Kitcher also had sensible prescriptions about employment and similar issues.

Kitcher probably wrote this book in hopes of kindling some public discussion and planning for the inevitable occurence of eugenics and widespread use of genetic information prior to its widespread implementation. This doesn't seem to have happened.
Mysterious Wrench
This thorough analysis of the implications and responsibilities of "the loss of genetic innocence" (that is, the obtainment of knowledge on our DNA that can and will propose novel ways of conducting ourselves in society)is explored from practically every possible perspective. It is historically confronted with nazi eugenics as well as projected towards the twentyfirst century with a brave-new-world-type hypothetical "genetic report card" of every citizen. But most importantly, the author uses real and current situations to expose to the reader many plausible interpretations and uses of that genetic understanding. Unlike other reviews posted here, I do not believe that the key issue in this book is trying to decide which specific traits we should "select for or against" (or even who to clone), but to reflect upon how are we to decide, as a scientifically initiated society with major political and ethical responsibilities, what the demarcations for genetic health or sickness are, as well as when personal or collective actions need to be taken. In sum, how to take the best advantage of that knowledge -because we cannot ignore it-, without surrendering to its mistakes.
Keel
This is a credible and sober work. Kitcher considers the expansion of gene- testing which is about to come , and its implications. He relates primarily to 'negative eugenics ' and the possibility of preventing disease and human suffering. He does not really speak about the more fantastic kinds of ' genetic engineering ' which would enhance humans.

The work was published ten years ago, and there has been great scientific progress in this time, including the mapping of the human genome. But most of the problems and questions here are still of great importance. And this book can provide valuable insight into them.
Gtonydne
Philip Kitcher's The Lives to Come is a thorough, nuanced look at the moral and social issues surrounding new genetic technologies. Kitcher starts the book with clear explanations of the basic science of genes and genetic technology, making the book accessible to non-scientists, and laying the groundwork for the rest of the book. He then addresses questions about uses and misuses of genetic technologies, including genetic profiling, forensics, and gene therapy. He discusses philosophical dilemmas around "playing god", the idea of human nature, and the fear that unveiling mysteries about human biology will diminish our sense of meaning and abolish the notion of freewill. The real heart of the book is his delve into the topic of eugenics, which he calls "inescapable" with our current technology. He disambiguates the general concept from previous eugenic practices in Europe and the US, and lays out guidelines for a system of "utopian eugenics". These guidelines include personal decision-making, health education and counseling, and equal access to technologies. Though Kitcher's book was published almost a decade ago, the issues it explores are just as relevant--and unresolved--today. It remains one of the best explorations of the vital moral and social issues brought up by our rapidly increasing biotechnological capabilities.
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