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Paradoxical Life: Meaning, Matter, and the Power of Human Choice ePub download

by Andreas Wagner

  • Author: Andreas Wagner
  • ISBN: 0300171528
  • ISBN13: 978-0300171525
  • ePub: 1979 kb | FB2: 1616 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Science & Mathematics
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (June 28, 2011)
  • Pages: 272
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 631
  • Format: lrf azw lit rtf
Paradoxical Life: Meaning, Matter, and the Power of Human Choice ePub download

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272 p. cm. A biochemist at the University of Zurich, Wagner (Robustness and Evolvability in Living Systems) explores the overlap among a wide range of biological phenomenon, including "the making of an embryo. A biochemist at the University of Zurich, Wagner (Robustness and Evolvability in Living Systems) explores the overlap among a wide range of biological phenomenon, including "the making of an embryo, the attack of a deadly virus, the building of a termite's mound, and human conversation," and the paradoxes contained therein.

Request PDF On Mar 1, 2011, Benjamin Murphy and others published Paradoxical Life: Meaning, Matter and . The power paradox: how we gain and lose influence. February 2017 · International Journal of Lifelong Education.

Request PDF On Mar 1, 2011, Benjamin Murphy and others published Paradoxical Life: Meaning, Matter and the Power of Human Choice.

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It ultimately serves a radical-and optimistic-outlook for humans and the world we help create.

Andreas Wagner's ambitious new book explores this hidden web of unimaginably complex interactions in every living being. In the process, he unveils a host of paradoxes underpinning our understanding of modern biology, contradictions he considers gatekeepers at the frontiers of knowledge. It ultimately serves a radical-and optimistic-outlook for humans and the world we help create.

Heythrop Journal 52 (2):338-339 (2011). Similar books and articles. This article has no associated abstract. Does Anything Matter? Stephen O'Connor - unknown. What's It All About?: Philosophy and the Meaning of Life. Julian Baggini - 2005 - Oxford University Press.

Your writing as always deepens my own thinking and I am very interested in your ongoing thinking about our situation today. I believe my own efforts are being shaped by the same attractor - but the focus is on a different dimension. Written by. john verdon.

Paradoxical Life: Meaning, Matter, and the Power of Human Choice. The Origins of Evolutionary Innovations: A Theory of Transformative Change in Living Systems. 1 Mb. Photovoltaik Engineering: Handbuch fur Planung, Entwicklung und Anwendung, 2. Auflage. 2. Genetic Algorithms and Genetic Programming: Modern Concepts and Practical Applications. Michael Affenzeller, Stephan Winkler, Stefan Wagner, Andreas Beham.

Paradoxical Life : Holdings. Subjects: Biology Philosophy. Life and Process : Towards a New Biophilosophy. by: Koutroufinis, Spyridon A. Published: (2014). What Is Life? : How Chemistry Becomes Biology. Teleology, First Principles, and Scientific Method in Aristotle's Biology.

What can a fingernail tell us about the mysteries of creation? In one sense, a nail is merely a hunk of mute matter, yet in another, it’s an information superhighway quite literally at our fingertips. Every moment, streams of molecular signals direct our cells to move, flatten, swell, shrink, divide, or die. Andreas Wagner’s ambitious new book explores this hidden web of unimaginably complex interactions in every living being. In the process, he unveils a host of paradoxes underpinning our understanding of modern biology, contradictions he considers gatekeepers at the frontiers of knowledge.

Though we tend to think of concepts in such mutually exclusive pairs as mind-matter, self-other, and nature-nurture, Wagner argues that these opposing ideas are not actually separate. Indeed, they are as inextricably connected as the two sides of a coin. Through a tour of modern biological marvels, Wagner illustrates how this paradoxical tension has a profound effect on the way we define the world around us. Paradoxical Life is thus not only a unique account of modern biology. It ultimately serves a radical—and optimistic—outlook for humans and the world we help create.

Amhirishes
As is typical of Andreas, his writing is meticulous and thoughtful. I had just read Sean Carroll's book "The Big Picture" which deals with meaning of existence from a physicist's point of view. But being a biologist I felt Sean did not represent the biological perspective on the meaning of existence very well. Andreas though presents an excellent biologist's perspective and does so in the terms of the almost limitless array of paradox present in biology. He speaks to choice in biological organisms from bacteria to humans and, to some extent, how those paradoxical processes differ in creating a different kind of meaning in biology than is derived from examining in terms of physics. Philosophy differs from each of these in some ways and I suspect other thinking perspectives would could up with their own perspective that may link to all others but still maintain some degree of independence. This is a fine work of scientific and philosophical thinking with the view of a molecular biologist coloring in the voids produced by the lines and coming up with a bit different picture than a theoretical physicist steeped in quantum theory comes up with. It gets one to wondering whether the late Stephen Hawking was maybe on the right track in his quest for a theory of everything. For the layman though, this is a fairly deep book, but Andreas' style is casual enough and illustrated well enough to be quite readable for the non-biologist. Highly recommended.
Shaktit
It is a simple book but it does meander a bit. The gist is: concepts like identity, mortality, continuity, meaning, and certainty are "paradoxical". Take identity as an example. How do you define the "boundary" of "an organism"? Are individual polyps that make up corals to be considered "individual organisms" or should the whole colony be considered one "single organism"? Take mortality. Without deaths, evolution could not proceed and everything would just die out - an apparent "paradox". The author goes on (and on) and provides numerous fascinating examples, primarily drawn from biology (even though he insists, probably correctly, that these paradoxes also exist in physics and chemistry). He argues that these paradoxes cannot be solved but human beings are endowed the ability to choose different perspectives so as to view the world with meaning but there will always be many, albeit not arbitrary, choices. I must say I don't agree with the author's conclusion but I do enjoy the book. It is, I have to admit, slightly long-winded. Four stars.
Sagda
This book explains clearly how life is the paradoxical result of creating meaning - or the other way around. With simple examples it shows how in different 'systems' the same processes are at work. How different systems, like cells, have their own way of working with meaning. The writer knows what he is talking about, the notes are very clear. I can recommend this book for everybody interested in paradoxes and meaning.
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