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The Rise of Causal Concepts of Disease: Case Histories (The History of Medicine in Context) ePub download

by K. Codell Carter

  • Author: K. Codell Carter
  • ISBN: 0754606783
  • ISBN13: 978-0754606789
  • ePub: 1956 kb | FB2: 1934 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Medicine & Health Sciences
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (April 22, 2016)
  • Pages: 248
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 200
  • Format: doc rtf mbr mobi
The Rise of Causal Concepts of Disease: Case Histories (The History of Medicine in Context) ePub download

Much of contemporary medical theory and practice focuses on the identification of specific causes of disease. One can track the rise and elaboration of this programme by a series of case histories.

Much of contemporary medical theory and practice focuses on the identification of specific causes of disease. However, this has not always been the case: until the early nineteenth century physicians thought of diseases in quite different terms. The success of work on bacterial diseases such as cholera and tuberculosis tends to eclipse the broad context in which those studies were embedded.

The history of medicine shows how societies have changed in their approach to illness and disease from ancient times to the present. Early medical traditions include those of Babylon, China, Egypt and India

The history of medicine shows how societies have changed in their approach to illness and disease from ancient times to the present. Early medical traditions include those of Babylon, China, Egypt and India. The Indians introduced the concepts of medical diagnosis, prognosis, and advanced medical ethics. The Hippocratic Oath was written in ancient Greece in the 5th century BCE, and is a direct inspiration for oaths of office that physicians swear upon entry into the profession today.

Book InformationThe Rise of Causal Concepts of Disease: Case Histories. The Rise of Causal Concepts of Disease: Case Histories K. Codell Carter, Aldershot : Ashgate, 2003 . The modern causal concept of medical disease, associated with Koch's postulates, exhibits this feature of essentialist thinking. This concept takes anthrax and tuberculosis as paradigm cases for all diseases ; each disease is to be explained by its own invading microorganism (Evans, 1993 ; Carter, 2003). Section 5 draws some conclusions on the role of Juglar in the history of business cycle theories, showing that this is not straightforward as it is commonly depicted.

Article in Medical history 49(04):525-526 · October 2012 with 24 Reads. Cite this publication. probability, succeeded in forming a valid concept of cause; that this theoretical model recently introduced in other models of causality in epidemiology did not always succeed in solving the several practical problems related to multicausality, which Rothman wanted to solve by defending a working definition of causality.

The Rise of Causal Concepts of Disease Case Histories The History of Medicine in Context.

One can track the rise and elaboration of this programme by a series of case histories. Yet, in the 1830s, fifty years before Koch's publications on tuberculosis, specific causes were already being identified for several non-bacterial diseases including scabies, muscardine and ringworm. Moreover, by the end of the century, the quest for specific causes had spread well beyond bacterial diseases.

Codell Carter tracks down central logical concepts that form the way we look at disease today. The endeavor sheds light on current mysteries such as why we haven't yet totally cured cancer as well as some of the mysterious past practices such as leeching and bleeding of the ill. Carter is probably the world's foremost authority on the practice of letting blood, and he is a trained logician.

Your name Please enter your name. K Codell Carter, The rise of causal concepts of disease: case histories, The History of Medicine in Context, Aldershot, Ashgate, 2003, pp. ix, 237, £5. 0 (hardback 0-7546-0678-3). Victoria A Harden (a1). US National Institutes of Health. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 26 July 2012. Recommend this journal.

Excellent addition to philosophy, history of science, and medicine collections. E-Streams 'Occasionally a book comes along from another discipline that illuminates a new path for historical study. The philosopher K Codell Carter's authoritative study of the transition from an assumption that diseases have multiple causes to the modern belief in universal, necessary causes is such a book. For decades, historians have fruitfully explored the social history of modern medicine to the neglect of its intellectual history.

One can track the rise and elaboration of this programme by a series of case histories.

Much of contemporary medical theory and practice focuses on the identification of specific causes of disease. However, this has not always been the case: until the early nineteenth century physicians thought of diseases in quite different terms. The modern quest for causes of disease can be seen as a single Lakatosian research programme. One can track the rise and elaboration of this programme by a series of case histories. The success of work on bacterial diseases such as cholera and tuberculosis tends to eclipse the broad context in which those studies were embedded. Yet, in the 1830s, fifty years before Koch's publications on tuberculosis, specific causes were already being identified for several non-bacterial diseases including scabies, muscardine and ringworm. Moreover, by the end of the century, the quest for specific causes had spread well beyond bacterial diseases. The expanding research programme included Freud's early work on psychopathology, the discovery of viruses, the discovery of vitamins, and the recognition of genetic disorders such as Down's syndrome. Existing historical discussions of research in these areas, for example, histories of work on the deficiencies diseases, take the view that success in bacteriology was a positive obstacle to the identification of causes for other kinds of diseases. Treating the quest for causes as a single coherent research programme provides a better understanding of the disease concepts that characterise the last 150 years of medical thought.
Xtreem
Before you start reading, remember that the author is primarily a philosopher, so this book is very thorough in philosophical, logical, and scholarly aspects and does not really try to cater to other (say, biology or computer science) tastes. In spite of this, I've liked it.

I'm taking a course from the author. In the book he raises some interesting questions about the traditional view of the history of medicine and proceeds to actually make sense of the beginnings of it. There are a few logical gaps that are easily overshadowed by the sense he makes of the history over all. The depth and meticulousness of his research is rather startling: it spans multiple languages and over a century of time and includes just about everything relevant. His main idea is usually clear in the beginning of any given section, though sometimes the sheer number of examples he uses to demonstrate a point is a touch monotonous.

Overall, if you're taking the class from Carter, you need the book. If you're looking for light reading and you like the preview, you won't be disappointed.

I'm a bit odd, I suppose: I like the construction of the book. The paper used is bright and the typeface is--to me--readable. The cover and binding seem well built. (No, it really shouldn't cost $130...)
Siratius
Very interesting topic with approach with a philosophical view. Carter is one of the world's foremost experts on the history of medicine.
Whitestone
Great
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