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Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality (Biopolitics) ePub download

by Jonathan M. Metzl,Anna Kirkland

  • Author: Jonathan M. Metzl,Anna Kirkland
  • ISBN: 0814795935
  • ISBN13: 978-0814795934
  • ePub: 1285 kb | FB2: 1273 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Medicine & Health Sciences
  • Publisher: NYU Press; 1 edition (November 23, 2010)
  • Pages: 226
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 302
  • Format: lrf mbr lit rtf
Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality (Biopolitics) ePub download

In Biopolitics, Lemke offers the first scholarly introduction to the idea of biopolitics

Is Breast Best? Taking on the Breastfeeding Experts and the New High Stakes of Motherhood Joan B. Wolf. In Biopolitics, Lemke offers the first scholarly introduction to the idea of biopolitics. The book is, in his words, a general orientation designed to present a historical overview of the concept of biopoli-tics, while also exploring the term’s relevance to contemporary the-oretical conversations and debates.

Jonathan Metzl, Anna Kirkland, Anna Rutherford Kirkland

Jonathan Metzl, Anna Kirkland, Anna Rutherford Kirkland. Against Health argues that health is a concept, a norm, and a set of bodily practices whose ideological work is often rendered invisible by the assumption that it is a monolithic, universal good.

Against Health argues that health is a concept, a norm, and a set of bodily practices whose ideological work is often rendered invisible by the assumption that it is a monolithic, universal good. To be clear, the book's stand against health is not a stand against the authenticity of people's attempts to ward off suffering.

Against Health : How Health Became the New Morality. by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland. You see someone smoking a cigarette and say,"Smoking is bad for your health," when what you mean is, "You are a bad person because you smoke.

Jonathan M. Metzl, Anna Kirkland. A physical cultural studies perspective on physical (in)activity and health inequalities: the biopolitics of body practices and embodied movement.

This book provides a strong antidote to the common notion that health is an unqualified good and often an. .

This book provides a strong antidote to the common notion that health is an unqualified good and often an individual responsibility. -Peter Conrad,Sociology of Health & Illness. Jonathan M. Metzl is Associate Professor in the Women’s Studies Department and the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan, where he also directs the program in culture, Health, and medicine. He is the author of Prozac on the Couch: Prescribing Gender in the Era of Wonder Drugs and Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease.

A new history of identity. Morality and Money: Double Pressure on Health Care. January 1984 · Health & social work. Collection of data concerning child health services February 1984.

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Published by: NYU Press. Against Health instead claims that individual strivings for health are, in some instances, rendered more difficult by the ways in which health is culturally configured and socially sustained. The book intervenes into current political debates about health in two ways. First, Against Health compellingly unpacks the divergent cultural meanings of health and explores the ideologies involved in its construction. Second, the authors present strategies for moving.

You see someone smoking a cigarette and say, “Smoking is bad for your health,” when what you mean is, “You are a bad person because you smoke.” You encounter someone whose body size you deem excessive, and say, “Obesity is bad for your health,” when what you mean is, “You are lazy, unsightly, or weak of will.” You see a woman bottle-feeding an infant and say, “Breastfeeding is better for that child’s health,” when what you mean is that the woman must be a bad parent. You see the smokers, the overeaters, the bottle-feeders, and affirm your own health in the process. In these and countless other instances, the perception of your own health depends in part on your value judgments about others, and appealing to health allows for a set of moral assumptions to fly stealthily under the radar.

Against Health argues that health is a concept, a norm, and a set of bodily practices whose ideological work is often rendered invisible by the assumption that it is a monolithic, universal good. And, that disparities in the incidence and prevalence of disease are closely linked to disparities in income and social support. To be clear, the book's stand against health is not a stand against the authenticity of people's attempts to ward off suffering. Against Health instead claims that individual strivings for health are, in some instances, rendered more difficult by the ways in which health is culturally configured and socially sustained.

The book intervenes into current political debates about health in two ways. First, Against Health compellingly unpacks the divergent cultural meanings of health and explores the ideologies involved in its construction. Second, the authors present strategies for moving forward. They ask, what new possibilities and alliances arise? What new forms of activism or coalition can we create? What are our prospects for well-being? In short, what have we got if we ain't got health? Against Health ultimately argues that the conversations doctors, patients, politicians, activists, consumers, and policymakers have about health are enriched by recognizing that, when talking about health, they are not all talking about the same thing. And, that articulating the disparate valences of “health” can lead to deeper, more productive, and indeed more healthy interactions about our bodies.

Broadraven
Rather than a fact-based critical appraisal of the use and misuse of health, this collection is riddled with anti-scientific rants and anecdotes masquerading as faux-intellectualism.

Perhaps the worst chapter, "Against Global Health" takes an inexplicable stance against the "empirical tyranny" of properly powered studies and statistically valid results in the field of global health. Another offender, "Against Breastfeeding (Sometimes)", nonchalantly dismisses the entire robust literature supporting the benefits of breastfeeding as "weak" and "contradictory" while later citing "expensive research" as proof for her pet theories. There seems to be a fundamental misunderstanding of epidemiological and biostatistical techniques by these sociologists.

Some chapters were worth a read, such as "The Social Immorality of Health in the Gene Age" and "Pharmaceutical Propaganda" which did problematize our modern conception of health as morality. However, these few oases can not save the overwhelming disregard for basing critical analysis on reality.
Coiron
The fifteen thought-provoking essays in Against Health treat topics ranging from the seductive but dangerous promise of race-based drug development to the impact of potential nuclear annihilation on American concepts of "health." Two chapters survey the invention of particular diagnostic categories (passive-aggressive personality disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder) and another reveals how pervasive drug company involvement in academic research on diseases and their treatment is. One consistent theme is the ways in which individual responsibility for "healthy" (read: morally good) behavior increasingly obscures larger patterns by which social inequalities in access to good food, medical care, and recreation are created and sustained. (For instance, people "run for a cure" and celebrate cancer survivorship but do not organize against widespread carcinogenic environmental contaminants.) Though some of what emerges is scary, the book is not fear-mongering. The essays are relatively short but based on serious research and careful analysis. They also build on each other and play off each other in interesting ways. Accessibly and clearly written, without a great deal of jargon, this book will forever alter the way one thinks about the rhetoric and reality of health.
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