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The Crisis of Imprisonment: Protest, Politics, and the Making of the American Penal State, 1776-1941 (Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society) ePub download

by Rebecca M. McLennan

  • Author: Rebecca M. McLennan
  • ISBN: 0521830966
  • ISBN13: 978-0521830966
  • ePub: 1380 kb | FB2: 1941 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (March 3, 2008)
  • Pages: 520
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 938
  • Format: lit azw mbr rtf
The Crisis of Imprisonment: Protest, Politics, and the Making of the American Penal State, 1776-1941 (Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society) ePub download

John Phillip Reid Book Award, American Society for Legal History (2009) .

John Phillip Reid Book Award, American Society for Legal History (2009). Cromwell Book Prize in American Legal History (2009): "McLennan sheds new light on the history of prisons and punishments from the early republic through the Progressive era by focusing on convict labor. She brings into sharp focus the complex and changing relationship between punishment, work, politics, and economics. Littleton-Griswold Prize in American Law and Society, American Historical Association (2008): "This detailed study of prisons, punishment, and convict labor fundamentally reshapes our understanding of the history of penology.

Its story of the rise and fall of contractual penal servitude shows how questions of imprisonment, prison labor, and the treatment of prisoners lay at the heart of ongoing struggles over the meaning of freedom and unfreedom in America. Few scholars have succeeded so well in tracing the reciprocal relations between the institutions of punishment and the broader fields of economic and political power with which they are connected.

Littleton-Griswold Prize in American Law and Society, American Historical Association (2008) .

Littleton-Griswold Prize in American Law and Society, American Historical Association (2008): "This detailed study of prisons, punishment, and convict labor fundamentally reshapes our understanding of the history of penology.

December 2004 · Journal of the Historical Society. Christian missions in the American empire. Episcopalians in northern Luzon, the Philippines, 1902–1946. Studies in the Intercultural History of Christianity, 13. Pp. 308. Frankfurt-am-Main: Peter Lang, 2003. The Liberal Christians: Essays on American Unitarian History.

the crisis of imprisonment In the Age of Jackson, private enterprise set up shop in the American penal system

the crisis of imprisonment In the Age of Jackson, private enterprise set up shop in the American penal system. Working hand in glove with state government, by 1900 contractors in both the North and the South would go on to put more than half a million imprisoned men, women, and youth to hard, sweated toil for private gain.

Cathedral City Historical Society Palo Alto Historical Association Southwest Railway Library Hemet Public Library Chapman . 1915-1917 - Punishment without labor : towards the modern penal state - Conclusion: On the crises of imprisonment.

Cathedral City Historical Society Palo Alto Historical Association Southwest Railway Library Hemet Public Library Chapman University, Frank Mt. Pleasant Library of Special Collections and Archives Watsonville Public Library Los Gatos Library.

The concept of penal state is familiar to me in the sense as introduced by Loïc Wacquant Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2009, 505 p. .

The concept of penal state is familiar to me in the sense as introduced by Loïc Wacquant. Rebecca McLennan, who does not refer to Wacquant, uses the concept in a different sense. It appears to refer either to the penal branch of the administration or to the intertwinement of governing and punishing  . Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2009, 505 pp., ISBN 978 0 521 53783 4. Pieter Spierenburg. Référence(s) : McLennan (Rebecca), The Crisis of Imprisonment.

The Crisis of Imprisonment: Protest, Politics, and the Making of the American Penal State, 1776–1941 Rebecca M. McLennan Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2008, ISBN: 9780521830966; 520pp. Her study underlines also that the development of US prisons does not fit neatly with Foucault’s conception of a new disciplinary apparatus of power/knowledge as detailed in Discipline and Punish: the Birth of the Prison.

Published online by Cambridge University Press: 18 August 2010. Recommend this journal.

oceedings{Ludi2014RezensionZR, title {Rezension zu: Rebecca M. McLennan, The Crisis of Imprisonment: Protest, Politics, and the Making of the American Penal State, 1776-1941, Cambridge 2008}, author {Regula Ludi}, year {2014} }. Regula Ludi.

In the Age of Jackson, private enterprise set up shop in the American penal system. Working hand in glove with state government, contractors in both the North and the South would go on to put more than half a million imprisoned men, women, and youth to hard, sweated toil for private gain by 1900. Held captive, stripped of their rights, and subject to lash and paddle, convict laborers churned out vast quantities of goods and revenue, in some years generating the equivalent of more than $30 billion worth of work. By the 1880s, however, a growing mass of Americans came to regard the prison labor system as immoral and unbefitting of a free republic: it fostered torture and other abuses, degraded free citizen-workers, corrupted government and the legal system, and stifled the supposedly ethical purposes of punishment. The Crisis of Imprisonment tells the remarkable story of this controversial system of penal servitude:-how it came into being, how it worked, how the popular campaigns for its abolition were ultimately victorious, and how it shaped and continues to haunt the American penal system. The author takes the reader into the morally vital world of nineteenth-century artisans, industrial workers, farmers, clergy, convicts, machine politicians, and labor leaders and shows how prisons became a lightning rod in a determined defense of republican and Christian values against the encroachments of an unbridled market capitalism. She explores the vexing ethical questions that prisons posed then and remain exigent today: What are the limits of state power over the minds, bodies, and souls of citizens and others-is torture permissible under certain circumstances? What, if anything, makes the state morally fit to deprive a person of life or liberty? Are prisoners slaves and, if so, by what right? Should prisoners work? Is the prison a morally defensible institution? The eventual abolition of prison labor contracting plunged the prisons into deep fiscal and ideological crisis. The second half of the book offers a sweeping reinterpretation of Progressive Era prison reform as, above all, a response to this crisis. It concludes with an exploration of the long-range impact of both penal servitude and the anti-prison labor movement on the modern American penal system.
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Wanenai
Terrific study that becomes more timely and more urgent with each year that passes since its publication. McLennan presents an altogether different and more complicated story, featuring prisoners, guards, administrators, penologists, private contractors, labor unions, and political figures and institutions in New York—the state that stood at the vanguard of national developments in the transformation of both prison life and the politics of punishment. McLennan charts the growth of a powerful and economically significant system of contract prison labor in the nineteenth century, which instituted and relied upon a brutal regime of industrial discipline that fits awkwardly (if at all) into Michel Foucault’s famous account of the modern prison. She also describes, with colorful detail, the fits and starts by which a coalition of forces (Reconstruction-era Republicans, unions, Democratic politicians in the Gilded Age, progressive reformers, former N.Y. Governors holding the reins of national power, and frequently the imprisoned themselves) sought to dismantle that system, often deploring the competition or the example of convict labor, but ultimately calling into question the equation between hard industrial work and just punishment.
Super P
An extremely well-written, fascinating, and comprehensive history of the American prison system and the way in which social ideas concerning punishment vs rehabilitation have changed over time.I would recommend this insightful read.
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