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Uprising of Hope: Sharing the Zapatista Journey to Alternative Development (Crossroads in Qualitative Inquiry) ePub download

by Jeanne Simonelli,Duncan Earle

  • Author: Jeanne Simonelli,Duncan Earle
  • ISBN: 0759105405
  • ISBN13: 978-0759105409
  • ePub: 1668 kb | FB2: 1208 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: AltaMira Press (January 28, 2005)
  • Pages: 344
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 722
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Uprising of Hope: Sharing the Zapatista Journey to Alternative Development (Crossroads in Qualitative Inquiry) ePub download

Uprising of Hope book.

Uprising of Hope book. Cultural anthropologists Duncan Earle and Jeanne Simonelli, drawing on decades-long relationships and fieldwork, attained a collegiality with the Zapatistas that reveals a more complex portrait of a people struggling with self-determi The Zapatistas of Chiapas, Mexico, have often been portrayed in reductive, polarized terms; either as saintly activists or dangerous rebels.

The Zapatistas of Chiapas, Mexico, have often .

The Zapatistas of Chiapas, Mexico, have often been portrayed in reductive, polarized terms; either as saintly activists or dangerous rebels. Cultural anthropologists Duncan Earle and Jeanne Simonelli, drawing on decades-long relationships and fieldwork, attained a collegiality with the Zapatistas that reveals a more complex portrait of a people struggling with self-determination on every level. Uprising of Hope will be compelling reading for scholars and general readers of anthropology, social justice, ethnography, Latin American history and ethnic studies.

Uprising of hope: sharing the Zapatista journey to alternative development - Duncan Earle & Jeanne Simonelli. Download pdf. Close.

Download Uprising of Hope: Sharing the Zapatista Journey to Alternative Development (Crossroads PDF. Ruth Olson.

This article examines the evolution of transnational Zapatista solidarity networks. Although scholars have described an emerging mutuality between the Zapatista movement and its allies at the level of international framing, this article considers how the Zapatistas forged this mutuality on the ground, through active redefinition of alliances with Northern supporters.

Cultural anthropologists Duncan Earle and Jeanne Simonelli, drawing on decades-long relationships and fieldwork, attained a collegiality with the Zapatistas that reveals a more complex portrait of a people struggling with self-determination on every level

Cultural anthropologists Duncan Earle and Jeanne Simonelli, drawing on decades-long relationships and fieldwork, attained a collegiality with the Zapatistas that reveals a more complex portrait of a people struggling with self-determination on every level. Seeking a new kind of experimental ethnography, Earle & Simonelli have chronicled a social experiment characterized by resistance, autonomy and communality.

Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device . Uprising of Hope: Sharing the Zapatista Journey to Alternative Development (Crossroads in Qualitative Inquiry).

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Uprising of Hope: Sharing the Zapatista Journey to Alternative Development (Crossroads in Qualitative Inquiry). Duncan Earle and Jeanne Simonelli. Thanks for supporting an independent and worker-owned bookstore!

The Zapatistas of Chiapas, Mexico, have often been portrayed in reductive, polarized terms; either as saintly activists or dangerous rebels. Cultural anthropologists Duncan Earle and Jeanne Simonelli, drawing on decades-long relationships and fieldwork, attained a collegiality with the Zapatistas that reveals a more complex portrait of a people struggling with self-determination on every level. Seeking a new kind of experimental ethnography, Earle & Simonelli have chronicled a social experiment characterized by resistance, autonomy and communality. Combining their own compelling narrative as participant-observers, and those of their Chiapas compadres, the authors effectively call for an activist approach to research. The result is a unique ethnography that is at once analytical and deeply personal. Uprising of Hope will be compelling reading for scholars and general readers of anthropology, social justice, ethnography, Latin American history and ethnic studies.
Contancia
This is the book for anyone who needs to know, whatever happened to the Zapatista rebels of Chiapas? Ever since the Mexican army dismantled the Zapatista liberated zone in 1998, it has been very difficult for outsiders who don't know Chiapas to figure out at what level the movement still exists. The two authors are U.S. anthropologists who take their students on service-learning trips. Between Earle and Simonelli, they have many years of contact with Mayan peasant families who are still Zapatistas, as well as with others who have rejected the movement. This enables them to chicken-bus their way past the rhetoric hurled by Zapatistas and their detractors. It also enables them to work their way into the autónomos, the autonomous municipalities that were set up by the Zapatistas, only to be wrecked by the Mexican army in 1998. But not destroyed, as the authors learn when some of their Mayan friends turn out to be quietly reconnecting to Zapatista headquarters.

Earle and Simonelli eschew the "ongoing search for the one true Subcomandante Marcos." Their passion is instead grassroots development, and the basic issue they face, raised by a decade of political reverses since the 1994 uprising, is whether there is any hope for the Zapatistas. Their answer is yes. Instead of discrete geographical entities, the autónomos now appear to be an NGO-supported logistical system for Zapatista loyalists cut off by government patronage machinery. The current era of negotiation and reconstruction is less attractive to news media than the previous era of machete-waving. But it is a blessing for the Zapatista and non-Zapatista peasants who have to get along with each other.

Earle and Simonelli argue that "live-in conservationist peasants" are the way to protect rainforest. They spiritedly defend the rationality of the smallholder even under capitalist globalization. And they believe that Zapatista-style autonomy can stablize Mexican society. The ideal, they argue, is a subsistence-oriented farmer who has enough urban skills to earn cash through savvy forms of production for the world market, e.g., the organic honey that the authors help their friends commercialize in the U.S. under what they call ZAFTA -the Zapatista Autonomous Free Trade Agreement. So what do the Zapatistas mean by autonomy? "Like the larger national and global civil society," Earle and Simonelli answer, "they are in search of balance between isolation and loss of control, wanting to be the authors of their own lives and, most especially, the lives of their children while still being tied in and tuned in to the larger world."
Meztisho
The authors, Jeanne Simonelli and Duncan Earle, effectively and powerfully convey the heartfelt and thoroughly thought out alternative economic, social, and political models found at the forefront of the Zapatista movement in La Selva Lacandon, located in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas. This ethnographic research breaks the boundaries of contemporary ethnographies by becoming part of the process, rather than observing from the sidelines.

Utilizing the objective methodologies, tools, and knowledge culminating from over 100 years of ethnographic studies in the discipline of Anthropology, the authors take the next step and move into the realm of anthropologist as activist, rather than solely acting as objective observers. Earle and Simonelli make a well articulated call for action to everyone who is in a position to help others in need.

With decades of combined experience in the region, Earle and Simonelli clearly and concisely express the mission of the current Zapatista movement. The intimate relations developed with the local community members involved place the authors in a position for truly understanding and expressing the ideas behind the actions of the Zapatista's alternative models. By allowing the communities to participate in the reviewing process, this ethnography becomes more precise in its information and less laden with the foreign ethnographer's bias and ideologies found in other ethnographic works.

For anyone wanting to learn a detailed account of the current Zapatista movement, and how it came to its current state, this book is a must read. It avoids focusing on the famous Subcomandante Marcos, and more accurately focuses on the power of the movement, the people. A must read for anyone wanting to know about the Zapatista's history and current status and the struggles of Mayan indigenous rights movements. Further, this book serves as an excellent guide for current and future anthropologists as a new form of ethnography.
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