» » Language of the Third Reich: LTI: Lingua Tertii Imperii

Language of the Third Reich: LTI: Lingua Tertii Imperii ePub download

by Victor Klemperer

  • Author: Victor Klemperer
  • ISBN: 0826491308
  • ISBN13: 978-0826491305
  • ePub: 1156 kb | FB2: 1887 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Continuum; unknown edition (July 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 288
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 177
  • Format: lrf azw txt lit
Language of the Third Reich: LTI: Lingua Tertii Imperii ePub download

LTI – Lingua Tertii Imperii: Notizbuch eines Philologen (1947) is a book by Victor Klemperer, Professor of Literature at the Dresden University of Technology.

LTI – Lingua Tertii Imperii: Notizbuch eines Philologen (1947) is a book by Victor Klemperer, Professor of Literature at the Dresden University of Technology.

Victor Klemperer, a front-line veteran of the First World War, became .

Victor Klemperer, a front-line veteran of the First World War, became Professor of French Literature at Dresden University. He was taken from his university in 1935 because he was Jewish, and only survived because of his marriage to an Aryan. Many things that were said during the aforementioned time period had double meanings.

Victor Klemperer's investigation into the Lingua Tertii Imperii may cause one to think twice before opening one's mouth.

Its original title, Lingua Tertii Imperii: Notizbuch eines Philologen (.

Victor Klemperer is famous today for his diaries covering the Nazi era in Germany. But those were published in 1995, thirty-five years after his death. Its original title, Lingua Tertii Imperii: Notizbuch eines Philologen (. Notebook of a Philologist), with the Latin evoking Imperial Rome, is more precise and informative, but I suppose we’re too uneducated today for that title to be used.

LTI ? Lingua Tertii Imperii. August 2009 · Philosophical Psychology.

Victor Klemperer (18811960) was Professor of French Literature at Dresden University. As a Jew, he was removed from his university post in 1935, only surviving. As Klemperer writes: ‘It isn’t only Nazi actions that have to vanish, but also the Nazi cast of mind, the typical Nazi way of thinking, and i. ore details.

Victor Klemperer, Martin Brady. Victor Klemperer (1881-1960) was Professor of French Literature at Dresden University. As a Jew, he was removed from his university post in 1935, only surviving thanks to his marriage to an Aryan.

A labourer, journalist and a professor who lived through four successive periods of German political history - from the German Empire, through the Weimar Republic and the Nazi state through to the German Democratic Republic - Victor Klemperer is rega.

A labourer, journalist and a professor who lived through four successive periods of German political history - from the German Empire, through the Weimar Republic and the Nazi state through to the German Democratic Republic - Victor Klemperer is regarded as one of the most vivid witnesses to a tumultuous century of European history.

Victor Klemperer: What was the most powerful Hitlerian propaganda tool? .

Victor Klemperer: What was the most powerful Hitlerian propaganda tool? Was it the individual speeches of Hitler and Goebbels, their pronouncements on this or that theme, their rabble-rousing against the Jews, against Bolshevism? 2 ответов 7 ретвитов 9 отметок Нравится. Instead Nazism permeated the flesh and blood of the people through single words, idioms and sentence structures which were imposed on them in a million repetitions and taken on board mechanically and unconsciously. 1 ответ 3 ретвитов 4 отметки Нравится.

Victor Klemperer (1881-1960) was Professor of French Literature at Dresden University. As a Jew, he was removed from his university post in 1935, only surviving thanks to his marriage to an Aryan. First published in 1957, The Language of the Third Reich arose from Klemperer's conviction that the language of the Third Reich helped to create its culture. As Klemperer writes: 'It isn't only Nazi actions that have to vanish, but also the Nazi cast of mind, the typical Nazi way of thinking, and its breeding ground: the language of Nazism.'

This brilliant book is by turns entertaining and profound, saddening and horrifying. It is deservedly one of the great twentieth-century studies of language and its engagement with history.

Translated by Dr Martin Brady.

Fani
To read the work by a German-Jew (according to the Nazi definitions) despite having converted to one of the Protestant branches, was valuable; he never disowned his German past, and in fact declares in text that "Nazism is not Germany - this is a totally foreign thing...this continuous strident yelling by gov't reps., this violence" entered in his journal when all this weird metamorphosis of a people was taking place - and an excellent chapter on Zionism, specifically Hertzl, and Zionism's odd parallels to the "Aryan" Hitlerian spirit - with reflected perspectives built into Mein Kampf. For anyone trying to understand as much as possible on what happened to this country of Bach, Beethoven and Goethe, etc., especially the 30 - 40 years prior to and then through Hitler crystal, this book is a must-buy. If one has already read some of the original texts from the period (Nazi - in German), you will see this "period" vocabulary identified and discussed in the context of a German citizen whose expertise is philology - the study of words - is spot-on. Really an excellent read. A government's scient use of certain words and idea-associations, then echoed by many in the press, sharing gov't goals and interests - and then given life and spirit in the mouth of the "common man" made me think of Noam Chomsky...
Also see texts by Lombroso, Max Nordau, Bainville, Gobineau, inter alia. Dr. Klemperer is good man. Glad he kept writing. I so wish this heinous period in human history never ever happened. So many innocent beautiful souls lost, too much and too many.
Yadon
An analysis of rhetoric used by the Nazi propagandists and taken up by the general public. The observations for the book were collected in Klemperer's diaries of 1933 to 1945, and reworked into a book shortly after the end of the war. There is slight overlap with the English translation of the diaries, which contain notes on common word use, but do not contain much analysis. The English translator omitted analytic notes in the diaries. I suspect that the full value of the work is obtained only by reading it in German.
Asher
After I took a rather large block of time to read the entire edited entries of Victor Klemperer's diaries entitled "I shall Bear Witness" and "To the Bitter End", I went on to read Klemperer's thesis on the language of the Third Reich.
As a well known professor of philology, Klemperer goes into great detail as to the change of the German language during the 12 year reign of the Third Reich. Along with the daily writings of Klemperer's diaries, Victor also engaged in his thesis of the language change which occurred in Germany from 1933 to 1945.
Many things that were said during the aforementioned time period had double meanings. To a Jew in Nazi Germany, the word privilege had an ominous meaning. In fact many rather innocent words, phrases and idioms meant rather different things to different people in Nazi Germany.
Victor Klemperer had the time and also the temerity to note these changes in the German language. As an oppressed Jew who actually survived the Nazi regime, he indeed noted the change of meanings in language and also the change of meanings in the very essence of German being and culture.
Klemperer is a latter day descendant of a mythical fly on the wall. To note he was a rather highly educated fly. Herr Klemperer really did see the black side of a totalitarian government. What is amazing is that Klemperer did indeed survive. To add to this rather amazing fact, the person who survived, was indeed intelligent enough to write about the happenings and form a rather succinct opinion of what transpired.
This book in a gem. I'm going to read it again, in order to benefit from all of Klemperer's thesis. I'm sure I'll learn more of this rather gruesome time period. If you have an historian's inclination, please do read this rather magnificent work.
Xurad
I was impelled to get this book after reading Klemperer's outstanding 2-volume diary of his time surviving as a Jew in Hitler's Germany. I Will Bear Witness: A Diary of the Nazi Years, 1933-1941 -I Will Bear Witness 1942-1945: A Diary of the Nazi Years During those years, Klemperer kept himself sane and productive by secretly working on writing an account of the changes he heard in people's language as they absorbed the mindset of the Fascist regime.

He documents the incursion of usages such as "fanatical" to describe everything praiseworthy. He notes how the names of mythic Teutonic heroes or Wagnerian characters became popular as given names, while Biblical names such as "Christian" were discouraged or banned altogether from use by "Aryan" members of the population. Jewish people, on the other hand, were required to append Old Testament names to themselves to further identify and segregate them.

Language was inflated. Nothing was allowed to be ordinary. Everything was pronounced as if from the podium of a State Occasion, and was directed, not to individuals, but to the masses. The smallest act became "historical" or indicative of a "blood" struggle. The use of superlatives abounded.

Besides such gross changes in language, Klemperer explores many subtle changes - the kind that seep into use below the level of awareness and work to insidiously alter one's outlook. You didn't any longer ask if so-and-so was ill. You asked if he was on the sick-list, because illness had to certified. It was a status that could only be bestowed by a higher authority. You didn't say you earned some money. You said you took home a package of pay. Again, the good was bestowed by a higher authority and did not come as a result of your singular, individual efforts.

These are just a few examples of the telling observations you'll find in these pages. Although Klemperer gets a little philosophically abstract here and there, and even makes some contradictory observations regarding usage - overall this book provides the kind of insight into the everyday lives of people in the Third Reich that you find in few other places.

It is strongest in documenting specific changes in languages usage. However, like almost every other work examining the horrors of the Regime, it fails to answer the overarching questions of "Why? - "How?" The reader is left to grapple with that overwhelming puzzle. The transformation and appropriation of the German citizenry becomes especially puzzling when viewed in light of certain other dictatorships that we've become familiar with since then - regimes that, despite heavy inflictions of a dictator's exhortations, have not led members of the general population to speak or think in such overloaded tanker terms.

What causes one people to be so virulently infected with the fervor of grandiose abstractions, while other groups of people come away from similar exhortations simply with regret and an ironic shrug?? That remains the unanswered, and perhaps unanswerable question. Even as brilliant an observer as Klemperer doesn't quite pull all the individual instances of transformation together to answer that ultimate "How?"
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