» » Village Life in Late Tsarist Russia (Indiana-Michigan Series in Russian and East European Studies)

Village Life in Late Tsarist Russia (Indiana-Michigan Series in Russian and East European Studies) ePub download

by Michael Levine,David L. Ransel,Olga Semyonova Tian-Shanskaia

  • Author: Michael Levine,David L. Ransel,Olga Semyonova Tian-Shanskaia
  • ISBN: 0253207843
  • ISBN13: 978-0253207845
  • ePub: 1506 kb | FB2: 1278 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press (May 22, 1993)
  • Pages: 208
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 499
  • Format: lrf azw mbr lrf
Village Life in Late Tsarist Russia (Indiana-Michigan Series in Russian and East European Studies) ePub download

Olga Semyonova Tian-Shanskaia (Author), Michael Levine (Translator), David L. Ransel (Translator) & 0 more. Chiefly, the reader gets a view of the post-emancipation Russian serf world from Tian-Shanskaia's aggregate fictional "Ivan".

Olga Semyonova Tian-Shanskaia (Author), Michael Levine (Translator), David L. ISBN-13: 978-0253207845. She was pretty much forced to eavesdrop on village gossip as she painted pictures in these villages to garner mostly anecdotal information about life among the peasants. In any case, we discover what Ivan liked and disliked, how his life was pre-ordained from even before his birth until his death including his infancy, adolescence, married life, and his life as a parent.

Indiana-Michigan Series in Russian & East European Studies .

Indiana-Michigan Series in Russian & East European Studies (Paperback).

by Olga Semyonova Tian-Shanskaia. Publisher: Indiana University Press. The translation is superb.

Olga Semyonova Tian-Shanskaia, Olʹga Petrovna Semenova Tjan-Šanskaja. Michael Levine has chronicled life as a federal agent in such books as Deep Cover. a marvelous source for the social history of Russian peasant society in the years before the revolution. He enjoys walks with his wife Laura Kavanu and dog in Ulster County, .

By Olga Semyonova Tian-Shanskaia, David L. Ransel, Michael Levine. Village Life in Late Tsarist Russia. By Olga Semyonova Tian-Shanskaia, David L.

Village Life in Late Tsar. An interesting book covering the life of peasants in late 19th century Russian. I thought their transition from serfs to free people was interesting.

Olga semyonova tian-shanskaia. Translated by David L. Ransel. Published by: Indiana University Press.

Bibliographic Details Publisher: Indiana Univ P. Standard shipping can on occasion take up to 30 days for delivery.

Bibliographic Details Publisher: Indiana Univ Pr. Publication Date: 2001. List this Seller's Books.

Olga Tian-Shanskaia; Michael Levine; David Ransel. a highly readable text that is an excellent introduction to the world of the Russian peasantry. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Olga Tian-Shanskaia; Michael Levine; David Ransel.

Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1993. xxx, 175 pp. Photographs. Recommend this journal. Stephen P. Frank (a1). University of California, Los Angeles.

... a marvelous source for the social history of Russian peasant society in the years before the revolution.... The translation is superb." ―Steven Hoch

... one of the best ethnographic portraits that we have of the Russian village.... a highly readable text that is an excellent introduction to the world of the Russian peasantry." ―Samuel C. Ramer

Village Life in Late Tsarist Russia provides a unique firsthand portrait of peasant family life as recorded by Olga Semyonova Tian-Shanskaia, an ethnographer and painter who spent four years at the turn of the twentieth century observing the life and customs of villagers in a central Russian province. Unusual in its awareness of the rapid changes in the Russian village in the late nineteenth century and in its concentration on the treatment of women and children, Semyonova’s ethnography vividly describes courting rituals, marriage and sexual practices, childbirth, infanticide, child-rearing practices, the lives of women, food and drink, work habits, and the household economy. In contrast to a tradition of rosy, romanticized descriptions of peasant communities by Russian upper-class observers, Semyonova gives an unvarnished account of the harsh living conditions and often brutal relationships within peasant families.

Brajind
The book does a thoughtful job of describing the life of a peasant, from conception to death. It’s grim, it’s dark, infant mortality rates are so high I am surprised anyone lived to adulthood. But under all that grim conditions is the stubborn, nearly pigheaded Russian will to live and enjoy life to the fullest.

I actually got this book because it has been referenced by some very old fanfiction as being excellent source material for writing Pavel Andrevich Chekov’s character from Star Trek the Original Series. And this book does a great job with explaining the Russian soil to someone who hasn’t a faintest clue.

The book itself is fairly slim, it can be read in maybe a long afternoon, but the information is densely packed in the form of stories by the author about various villagers they meet.

The section of childbirth and babies is sort of repeated in the book twice, but that isn’t a deterrent: lots of information both times .
mym Ђудęm ęгσ НuK
First and foremost, this book is an outstanding anthropological achievement by the original author, Olga Semyonova Tian-Shanskaia, who died a few years prior to its actual publication in 1914.

In spite of the longwinded and boring (but still informative) introduction by Editor David L. Ransel, the core of Tian-Shanskaia's writing and her straightforward approach to the [then] young science of anthropology shines through to make this account quite a fascinating read for nearly anyone. I don't mean treat Ransel harshly but, as a university professor carrying out a funded project, he was clearly forced to swallow a certain amount of input from associates and other scholarly drones.

I'm certain that this 20-page Introduction would have come off as infinitely more palatable and devoid of academic baggage had Ransel just sat down and written it from his clear knowledge of the author and from his heart -- in other words, there were too many cooks in the kitchen. But this is only a mild critique of the work and the fact that Ransel included a nice black-and-white photo of the author as well as a map of the study area at the very outset balances out the other shortcomings. I also found Ransel's footnotes, throughout the book, to be quite enlightening.

Chiefly, the reader gets a view of the post-emancipation Russian serf world from Tian-Shanskaia's aggregate fictional "Ivan". She was pretty much forced to eavesdrop on village gossip as she painted pictures in these villages to garner mostly anecdotal information about life among the peasants. In any case, we discover what Ivan liked and disliked, how his life was pre-ordained from even before his birth until his death including his infancy, adolescence, married life, and his life as a parent. The account includes discussion of social interaction, economics, and the many ominous labors which every peasant had to bear in order to survive. Death by accident, disease, or homicide was clearly a daily possibility for Russia's muzhiks.

This is a nicely-bound college text-type paperback, 176 pages in length. It reads as smoothly as fiction and I highly recommend it.

I should also add that if you read and enjoy this book, you'll probably also like Lyeskov's fictional Enchanted Wanderer.
Tebei
This is not written with introspection or prose designed to draw the reader in, but it is still a fascinating document for anyone who studies Russian history.
Gralinda
I do not possess enough professional knowledge to critique the accuracy of the work or quality of compilation. However, as a professional Russian translator who has traveled in Russia and continues to study its culture, I found this a fascinating look by an early ethnographer into daily life in Russian villages. The translation is clear and very readable, well-supplemented with notes and many photographs. The authors compiled this book from a great deal of related documents left by Tian-Shanskaya, and made use of other related ethnographic work. They include explanations of the sources where appropriate, which gives the book and added value: the reader gets a sense of how this unified book of her work was patched together. They give a good overview of the contemporary context of her work and of the 'peasant question'. In addition, they explain what they perceive as the influence of her own ideals and values upon the interpretation of peasant behavior, and compare it to later theories (for example, where she reports chronic 'squandering' of surpluses, they compare it to later theories of the peasants' perception of a limited world of resources and the importance of investing in status within the social network of the village). The book contains many overheard conversations and remarks among peasants. All in all, a pearl of a book, in my opinion.
Xurad
But not a PLEASANT afternoon! This book was interesting but at times gruesome. These people certainly did not have easy lives and it's a wonder any of them lived past birth! Their living conditions were so bad it made the middle ages look like a how to manual on personal hygiene! I had an aunt who always said a little dirt never hurt anyone. Well Russian peasants in the late 19th century proved that a LOT of dirt didn't necessarily hurt you either. I would recommend this book to anyone who'd like to learn about another culture from an earlier time and to see just how difficult life was for some people in the "good old days!". But be prepared for some of it to be difficult and disturbing. Hope they never make a movie of it!
Mysterious Wrench
Book was well intentioned and had ample warning that author was using dated and possibly biased sources. Regardless, text did cove major topic in good order and was interesting esp for teaching a history of Russia seminar.
Arthunter
Wonderful book
E-Books Related to Village Life in Late Tsarist Russia (Indiana-Michigan Series in Russian and East European Studies):