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A Theology of the Built Environment: Justice, Empowerment, Redemption ePub download

by T. J. Gorringe

  • Author: T. J. Gorringe
  • ISBN: 0521814650
  • ISBN13: 978-0521814652
  • ePub: 1568 kb | FB2: 1579 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (August 19, 2002)
  • Pages: 294
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 402
  • Format: txt lrf lit mobi
A Theology of the Built Environment: Justice, Empowerment, Redemption ePub download

Tim Gorringe's is the first book to reflect theologically on the built environment as a whole. Gorringe delves into the theology and ethics of urban design with an emphasis on redemption and social justice. These are certainly significant issues.

Tim Gorringe's is the first book to reflect theologically on the built environment as a whole.

Gorringe's book reflects theologically on the built environment. After considering the divine grounding of constructed space, he looks at the ownership of land, the issues of housing (both urban and rural) and considers the built environment in terms of community and art. The book concludes with two chapters that set everything within the current framework of the environmental crisis and question directions the Church should be pursuing in building for the future. For nearly a millennium and a half after Aristotle, economics was understood as a sub discipline of ethics. The book concludes with two chapters that set everything within the current framework of the envi . Gorringe's book reflects theologically on the built environment

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January 2013 · Modern Theology. Joelle Anne Hathaway. Categories: Art\Design: Architecture.

Gorringe builds on the idea of community in Chapter 8, focusing on the creativity of designing built communities. Gorringe’s theology of global liberation could be called a theology of home

Gorringe builds on the idea of community in Chapter 8, focusing on the creativity of designing built communities. Gorringe proposes five things that make a place beautiful, with a deep spirituality that nurtures the human soul. Beautiful places must respect nature, exude life, respect the past and corporate memory, have community buildings and common space, and respect its poor. Gorringe’s theology of global liberation could be called a theology of home. Sin represents our alienation from the world, our reduction of it to nothing but a set of resources for the rich (239). On the other hand, grace recognizes the world as a gift of home.

Gorringe’s book reflects theologically on the built environment. Publication Information. Author: Timothy Gorringe. Publication Type: Book. Publisher:Cambridge University Press.

In this 2002 book, Tim Gorringe reflects theologically on the built environment as a whole. Cambridge University Press. ENG. Number of Pages.

Recent election wins by left of center parties in Western Europe testify to the continued vitality of the tradition of democratic socialism. Socialism has been the leading ideology for social change for over a century. It has been a philosophy, a mass movement, and a substitute religion. It has inspired millions and aroused fear and revulsion in its enemies. It has sought to change the world for the better and in many important respects has done so. Yet socialism remains a paradox.

T.J. Gorringe's book reflects theologically on the built environment. After considering the divine grounding of constructed space, he looks at the ownership of land, the issues of housing (both urban and rural) and considers the built environment in terms of community and art. The book concludes with two chapters that set everything within the current framework of the environmental crisis and question directions the Church should be pursuing in building for the future.
Bele
Gorringe delves into the theology and ethics of urban design with an emphasis on redemption and social justice. These are certainly significant issues. Built Environment is rooted firmly in a liberal Protestant tradition, and at times I found myself wishing that Gorringe would take Eliade more seriously or consider the human capacity to set space aside as sacred (that is, our ability to say yest to God's redemptive work). This work certainly makes for a decent companion to Eliade and Richard Kieckhefer's Theology in Stone.

As for clarity, the book needed another edit or two. Sentences are overly long and muddled to the point that a class full of graduate students and their professor had trouble deciphering certain sections. (Edit: With some irony, I just had to correct a typo in my title.)
Kizshura
Goringe argues that theology ought to be concerned about space, architecture, design, public policy, ecological sustainability and city planning, because all of life expresses our theology and even buildings "make moral statements"(1).

Gorringe starts his argument by basically saying that we build our environment and then our environment builds us, thus we ought to care about how we build our environment. He proposes a Trinitarian mapping of spatiality. God the Holy Spirit, the Redeemer, is "the author and inspirer of all those visions of a better human environment" (48) and God the Father is the Creator who "brings order out of chaos, the structuring of space by form" (48) and God the Son, the Reconciler "takes flesh in order to teach peace to the nations and make justice concrete (49). Gorringe then takes this mapping of spatiality and makes it concrete, by looking at land as a gift that ought to be stewarded for the whole rather than absolutely possessed by the individual. When talking about housing, he proposes environmentally sustainability as a key feature for future building as well as beauty in diversity. He continues to apply this Trinitarian mapping to the town and country, the city, and the built environment in terms of community and art. He concludes with how to proceed in the future with the environmental crises that is upon us.

Having lived in the suburbs and a college town for most of my life and the city for the last six years of my life, I can really appreciate Gorringe's thesis that we make our space and then our space makes us, so we ought to care about how we make our space. The more I live, the more that I sense the ethos of a place by simply walking around and feeling and sensing what is all around me. As my understanding of the gospel become more robust, I am able to see how God is concerned about redeeming every aspect of life, including space, architecture, our approach to housing, sustainable living and public policy because each of these things that Gorringe talks about in this book shape the kind of people we become. One quote that continues to run around in my mind is, "In the built environment social relations are inscribed concretely in space. All ideologies 'project themselves into a space, becoming inscribed there, and in the process producing that space itself" (27). This is something that I want to continue to think about as I live out my life here in the city.

Having recently been elected to serve on the board of the East Hollywood Neighborhood Council, I have had the privilege to learn much more about the environment that I live in, and I have even voted on a number proposals that have come before our board like whether or not a particular house should be torn down and replaced by an apartment complex that doesn't really fit the neighborhood. I have learned that Los Angeles has the least amount of parks for any major city and I have the opportunity to bring a greater degree of redemption to the city by working for more public parks as well as concrete justice in regards to affordable housing. This book has helped to bring a greater sense of value to the hours that I spend wrestling through a lot of "built environment" issues that we face as a city. I plan to re-read this book so that I might bring a greater sense of beauty and redemption to our neighborhood.
Roru
given as a gift
Dogrel
The mid-20th century witnessed a brief flourishing of theological writing about the city, as authors addressed post-World War II modernity. Harvey Cox's "The Secular City" and Jacques Ellul's "The Meaning of the City" stand out as landmarks from this age.

In the early 21st century a new set of urban issues are upon us. Familiar concerns of poverty and racism are joined by issues of sustainability, urban-rural interrelationships, and placemaking. Gorringe's work stands out as a vanguard theological treatise addressing this new set of concerns. What sets him apart from other writers is the breadth and depth of his thinking. Few theologians have a grasp of secular urban theory that is as profound as Gorringe's. This 2002 work draws deeply on such thinkers as Lewis Mumford and David Harvey, whose insights continue to guide some of the most thoughtful urban planners and policy makers of our time. But like his theological mentor Karl Barth, Gorringe approaches our world with sound secular thinking in one hand and the Bible in the other. The result is a richly nuanced perception of the work of the Trinitarian Creator, Reconciler and Redeemer calling humanity to reflect that work in the constructed environment that now girdles our increasingly urbanized world.

One reviewer has mistakenly insisted that Gorringe's book is only for Christians. Not so - it is for all who seek to glimpse the possibilities of a world that delightfully balances urban and rural places in a way that is both just and enchanting.
CrazyDemon
I disagree with the previous reviewer. This is a theological text about the built environment. As such, it describes a Christian way of approaching the built environment, and asserts that within this theological ethic, a trinitarian ethic must be applied. It does not say that only Christians can contribute to the built environment, but its audience is clearly Christians who want to do so. In that regard, this book fills a gap in theological writings - it carefully considers the impact of our environment and forms a theology about it. Sometimes the reading can get dense, but it is explained clearly and the author makes several good points. It's a thought-provoking and captivating work.
Jerinovir
This is a book exclusively for Christians, particularly those Christians who are certain that only Christians can contribute to the improvement of the world. "I want to argue that the built environment relates to every area of Christian ethics, and that only a Trinitarian ethic, an ethic of creation, reconciliation, and redemption, is adequate to explore it," writes the author (p. 5). If you are looking for an architectural ethics that will help you think about how the built landscape contributes to social justice or impedes it, how structures interact with their builders and occupiers, how buildings may be dangerous or protective, this is not the right book to read. If, however, you are a fervent Christian who would like to see how your religious views may be imposed on architecture along with all other expressions of social life, here is the text for you.
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