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Hitler's Secret Pirate Fleet: The Deadliest Ships of World War II ePub download

by James P. Duffy

  • Author: James P. Duffy
  • ISBN: 0275966852
  • ISBN13: 978-0275966850
  • ePub: 1866 kb | FB2: 1669 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Praeger; First edition (September 15, 2001)
  • Pages: 248
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 478
  • Format: rtf doc mobi mbr
Hitler's Secret Pirate Fleet: The Deadliest Ships of World War II ePub download

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. These tales of raiders' and their crews are well told; Duffy paints richly colored portraits of Hitler's secret pirate fleet and these chivalrous corsairs.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. They were the deadliest ships of World War II-nine German commerce raiders disguised as peaceful cargo ships. 14 people found this helpful.

These secret ships also acted as supply ships for U-boats, helping their fellow hunters remain at large for longer . JAMES P. DUFFY is a writer specializing in military history.

These secret ships also acted as supply ships for U-boats, helping their fellow hunters remain at large for longer periods. At sea for months-or even years-those raider sailors lucky enough to survive were hailed as heroes when they returned home. He is the author of 12 books, including Hitler Slept Late and other Blunders that Cost Him the War (Praeger, 1991), The Assassination of John F. Kennedy: A Complete Book of Facts with Vincent L. Ricci (1992), Target Hitler: The Plots to Kill Adolf Hitler with Vincent L. Ricci (Praeger, 1992), Czars: Russias Rulers for Over One.

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Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. March 28, 2019 History. March 28, 2019 History found in the catalog. Hitler's secret pirate fleet: the deadliest ships of World War II. Close. Are you sure you want to remove Hitler's secret pirate fleet: the deadliest ships of World War II from your list? Hitler's secret pirate fleet: the deadliest ships of World War II. by James P. Duffy. Published 2005 by University of Nebraska Press in Lincoln.

Hitler's Secret Pirate Fleet. The Deadliest Ships of World War II. By Duffy, James P. 2001, Praeger ISBN 0275966852 Hardcover, 222 pages, photos & maps. Descripton: Disguised as merchant vessels, these ships attacked Allied shipping and provided logistical and material support to the U-boats.

They were the deadliest ships of World War II-nine German commerce raiders disguised as peaceful cargo ships, flying the flags of neutral and allied nations. In reality these heavily armed warships roamed the world's oceans at will, like twentieth-century pirates. They struck unsuspecting freighters and tankers out of the darkness of night or from behind a curtain of fog and mist.

German & Allied Secret Weapons of World War I.

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Second World War (content). DUFFY, JAMES P. (Author) Praeger (Publisher). Over two million American servicemen passed through Britain during the Second World War. In 1944, at the height of activity, up to half a million were based there with the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF). Their job was to man and maintain the vast fleets of aircraft needed to attack German cities and industry. Imperial War Museums home Connect with IWM.

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The ship's complement suffered its first fatality when a sailor, named Bernhard Herrmann, fell while painting the funnel. a b c d Duffy, James P. (2001). Hitler's secret pirate fleet : the deadliest ships of World War II (1. publ. He was buried in what is sometimes referred to as "the southernmost of all German war graves". In late January 1941, off the eastern coast of Africa, Atlantis sank the British ship Mandasor and captured Speybank. Then, on 2 February, the Norwegian tanker Ketty Brøvig was relieved of her fuel.

They were the deadliest ships of World War II--nine German commerce raiders disguised as peaceful cargo ships, flying the flags of neutral and allied nations. In reality, these heavily armed warships roamed the world's oceans at will, like 20th-century pirates. They struck unsuspecting freighters and tankers out of the darkness of night or from behind a curtain of fog and mist. For almost three years they led the Royal Navy on a deadly chase from sea to sea, seeding Allied ports with hundreds of mines and, on one occasion, even bombarding a shore installation.

Masquerading as unarmed merchantmen, the raiders carried an awesome array of weapons cleverly hidden behind false structures and concealed inside empty packing crates on their decks. Seaplanes and motorboats helped them seek out their victims on the vast seas. They then fed off of these unsuspecting targets, pumping fuel from their prey into their own tanks and taking food from captured pantries to feed their own crews and the thousands of prisoners that they picked up along the way. These secret ships also acted as supply ships for U-boats, helping their fellow hunters remain at large for longer periods. At sea for months--or even years--those raider sailors lucky enough to survive were hailed as heroes when they returned home.

Daron
There have been a number of books written since the 1950s concerning Germany's disguised commerce raiders - known as Hilfkreuzer - and James Duffy's Hitler's Secret Pirate Fleet draws heavily upon earlier books by David Woodward, Bernhard Rogge and Karl Muggenthaler. Nevertheless, Hitler's Secret Pirate Fleet is a well-written and updated account that provides a fresh look at these raiders. On the plus side, the book flows very well and is written at a level that should satisfy both specialist and general readers. On the other hand, there is no fresh research underlying this work and the author doesn't even refer to strategic factors such as ENIGMA that may have eventually helped to neutralize this threat. As such, this book represents an interesting introduction to the subject, but not much more.

The book is divided into nine chapters, each of which covers the wartime career of one of the Kriegsmarine's disguised commerce raiders. At the start of each chapter, there is a crude sketch map that depicts where each of that particular raider's victims were sunk or captured, but the raider's actual route is not depicted. The book has five appendices (identities of the raiders, technical data, armament data, war records of the raiders, the Sydney Controversy) and a bibliography, but no footnotes. There are also ten B/W photos included.

Chapter one begins with the cruise of the Atlantis, the first raider to sail in 1940 and proceeds through the exploits of each raider. Certainly the best chapter is the one involving the fight between the radar Stier and the American Liberty Ship Stephen Hopkins. One thing that the book sorely lacks is an overview chapter that provides some strategic context, as well as a bit more on British reactions to the raiders and an assessment of their commerce-raiding on the war. Although the author provides a table which tallies up what each raider sank, there is no effort to assess the significance of these losses. Many of these chapters are similar to the chapters in Muggenthaler's earlier book and when you compare the two, it is apparent that Duffy has synthesized some of the material and even manages to leave out a few pertinent facts here and there. Despite this `rehashed' flavor to the book, Hitler's Secret Pirate Fleet is never dull and most readers should find that it covers a little-known aspect of the Second World War at sea in a most interesting fashion.
Gianni_Giant
Great read! As an avid reader of military history, especially of the World Wars, it was nice to read about an aspect of Hitlers naval war that's not just about the U Boat war. This book covers a history of all German Auxiliary cruisers. Highly recommended!
Arakus
From 1940 to 1943 nine German surface raiders (Atlantis, Orion, Widder, Thor, Pinguin, Komet, Kormoran, Michel, and Stier) effectively used deception against both merchantmen and warships. These disguised auxiliary cruisers sank or captured 140 ships (including the cruiser HMAS Sydney), totaling over one million tons, and greatly disrupted British and American shipping in the South Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Duffy's "Hitler's Secret Pirate Fleet: The Deadliest Ships of World War II" is well titled; the German raiders were far more lethal than the average U-boat and about half as effective as Germany's top twenty U-boats and best submarine aces.
The German raiders were well armed: all carried half a dozen 5.9 inch guns, 1-2 seaplanes, 5-8 anti-aircraft guns, torpedo tubes, and mines. Deceptive tactics were standard procedure: false flags, deceptive signals, radio jamming (to smother warning and distress broadcasts), stealthy stalking, smoke and false fires, crewmen dressed as women pushing baby carriages. Every week or two the raiders would alter their identities; Atlantis could successfully imitate 26 other vessels. The raiders stayed at sea for months (Atlantis for 622 days, five of the nine for over a year; in contrast a long U-boat deployment was 200 days), rendezvousing with supply ships and tanker U-boats, and sending prize crews and prisoners to Axis ports on captured ships.
Early Allied mistakes aided the raiders. Since raiders jammed the distress calls of their victims, the British Admiralty instructed all merchantmen hearing a distress call being jammed to send their own position and the bearing to the jammed transmission. This located all the merchantmen in a raider's vicinity. The raiders soon sent fake distress calls, jammed them, and then waited for the merchantmen in the vicinity to send their positions and bearings to the supposed distress call. Raiders would cover each other by sending multiple false distress calls to hide a real one.
The raiders' deceptive tricks (and the inattention of their opponents) yielded some stunning victories. For example, the Kormoran, disguised as a Dutch freighter, played an elaborate cat-and-mouse game with HMAS Sydney, hoisting tangled signal flags, garbling identification messages, playing dumb to Sidney's challenges, until Kormoran closed to within a kilometer of Sydney. The Kormoran then ran up the swastika, dropped its camouflage screens and destroyed Sydney's bridge and two forward gun turrets in 30 seconds. Sydney eventually sank with all hands, the worst naval loss in Australian history.
The German raiders' war was (for the Kriesmarine) relatively long; by May 1943 the Michel was Germany's last warship on the high seas. On the night of September 29, 1943, she accidentally but successfully sailed through the middle of an entire U.S. Navy Task Force. In October 1943, Michel's stealth and deception tricks finally failed her. The USS Tarpon torpedoed the last German commerce raider outside Tokyo Bay. But while Nazi Germany's grandiose pocket battleships and battleships were swiftly dispatched (Graf Spee, Bismarck) or bottled up (Tirpitz, Scharnehorst, Prince Eugen), her inexpensive commerce raiders effectively prowled the sea lanes for years. Deception trumped firepower, until bested by counter-deception.
Duffy provides detailed accounts of each raider, every engagement, even the various animals captured from the raiders' prizes. In the tradition of Jean Laffite, raider captains and crews displayed an almost 18th Century gallantry, the stuff of adventure films (after the war De Laurentiis produced Under Ten Flags, based on the exploits of the raider Atlantis). Captured crewmen and passengers were uniformly well treated, sharing the quarters, rations, and entertainments of their German capturers. These tales of raiders' and their crews are well told; Duffy paints richly colored portraits of Hitler's secret pirate fleet and these chivalrous corsairs.
Levion
Duffy has written a good historical account of the German Navy's commerce raiders. (A better description of the ships was auxiliary merchant cruisers or AMC.) I liked his description of the action against British AMCs and the defeat of HMAS Sidney by a German raider.
Kendis
Author Duffy relates the only treatise I have found about Hitler's
"Q-ships". These cruiser-armed vessels, disguised as harmless
merchant steamers, sank many thousands of tons of shipping
during their brief reign. I had no idea such extensive operations
were conducted in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans, and
around Antarctica. One raider even slugged it out toe-to-toe
with an Australian navy cruiser--resulting in the sinking of
both ships;a source of chagrin in Australia to this day. A
somewhat pedantic writing style is my only criticism of this
book. The information presented is truly unique and worthwhile.
Grari
This was not a Pirate fleet. The Germans Kriegs Marine repeated the same as in First World War. Warships concealed as Merchants.Other wise their prisoners were well feeded and well cared.Be conscient I am not a sympathizer of Nazi Germany,but of the true.
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