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Six Walks in the Fictional Woods ePub download

by Umberto Eco

  • Author: Umberto Eco
  • ISBN: 0674810511
  • ISBN13: 978-0674810518
  • ePub: 1528 kb | FB2: 1412 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press; Reprint edition (July 21, 1998)
  • Pages: 160
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 830
  • Format: rtf lrf lit docx
Six Walks in the Fictional Woods ePub download

Umberto Eco, international best-selling novelist and leading literary theorist . In this authoritative, lively book, the celebrated Italian novelist and philosopher Umberto Eco presents a learned summary of medieval aesthetic ideas

Umberto Eco, international best-selling novelist and leading literary theorist, here brings together these two roles in a provocative discussion of the vexed question of literary interpretation. The limits of interpretation-what a text can actually be sa. A Theory of Semiotics. In this authoritative, lively book, the celebrated Italian novelist and philosopher Umberto Eco presents a learned summary of medieval aesthetic ideas. Juxtaposing theology and science, poetry and mysticism, Eco explores the relationship that existed betw. Mouse or Rat?: Translation as Negotiation. by Umberto Eco. 2004·.

Six Walks in the Fictional Woods is a non-fiction book by Umberto Eco. Originally delivered at Harvard for the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures in 1992 and 1993, the six lectures were published in the fall of 1994. The book derives its title from Italo Calvino's Six Memos for the Next Millennium but Eco also cites Calvino's If On a Winter's Night a Traveler as inspiration because the novel "is concerned with the presence of the reader in the story", which was also the subject of the lectures and book.

Further, the book serves as a loose critical complement to Eco's own novels and those of other innovative writers whom Eco admires, people like Sterne, Joyce, and Borges, not to mention his late friend, Italo Calvino, fellow Italian and pre- senter of the 1985 Norton Lectures

Eco draws us in by means of a novelist's techniques, making us his collaborators in the creation of his text and in the "Come stroll with me through the leafy . The book comprise six lectures Umberto Eco gave at Harvard.

Eco draws us in by means of a novelist's techniques, making us his collaborators in the creation of his text and in the "Come stroll with me through the leafy glades of narrative. I wonder how the participants at those lectures might have been influenced by them.

Umberto Eco was Professor Emeritus at the University of Bologna and the author of many books, including . He is given to more abstruse and academic thinking. Six Walks in the Fictional Woods should have been better. 7 people found this helpful.

Umberto Eco was Professor Emeritus at the University of Bologna and the author of many books, including Foucault’s Pendulum.

Eco draws us in by means of a novelist's techniques, making us his collaborators in the creation of his text and in the investigation of some of fiction's most basic mechanisms.

We see, hear, and feel Umberto Eco, the passionate reader who has gotten lost over and over again in the woods, loved it, and come back to tell the tale, The Tale of Tales.

Using examples from fairy tales and Flaubert, Poe and Mickey Spillane, Eco draws us in with a novelist's techniques, making us his collaborators in the creation of his text and in the investigation of some of fiction's most basic mechanisms. We see, hear, and feel Umberto Eco, the passionate reader who has gotten lost over and over again in the woods, loved it, and come back to tell the tale, The Tale of Tales. Eco tells us how fiction works, and he also tells us why we love fiction so much.

Originally delivered at Harvard for the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures, 1993, as a series, in the fall of 1994, they were subsequently published in book form in 1994.

Nada es más nocivo para la creatividad que el furor de la inspiración. Originally delivered at Harvard for the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures, 1993, as a series, in the fall of 1994, they were subsequently published in book form in 1994.

Using examples ranging from fairy tales and Flaubert, Poe and Mickey Spillane, Eco draws us in by means of a novelist's techniques, making us his collaborators in the creation of his text and in the investigation of some of fiction's most basic mechanisms.

Are you sure you want to remove Six Walks in the Fictional Woods from your list?

Umberto Eco. Six Walks in the Fictional Woods. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Six Walks in the Fictional Woods from your list? Six Walks in the Fictional Woods. 17 Want to read. Published July 21, 1998 by Harvard University Press. Technique, Narration (Rhetoric), Fiction, Protected DAISY.

In Six Walks in the Fictional Woods Umberto Eco shares with us his Secret Life as a reader―his love for MAD magazine, for Scarlett O'Hara, for the nineteenth-century French novelist Nerval's Sylvie, for Little Red Riding Hood, Agatha Christie, Agent 007 and all his ladies. We see, hear, and feel Umberto Eco, the passionate reader who has gotten lost over and over again in the woods, loved it, and come back to tell the tale, The Tale of Tales. Eco tells us how fiction works, and he also tells us why we love fiction so much. This is no deconstructionist ripping the veil off the Wizard of Oz to reveal his paltry tricks, but the Wizard of Art himself inviting us to join him up at his level, the Sorcerer inviting us to become his apprentice.
Iriar
3.5 stars.
I bought this book in part because I am a fan of Umberto Eco, In part because of the reviews and because I like learning from writers what they think readers should know. I wanted to like this book. Mostly I am frustrated by it. I understand why others are impressed with it. Perhaps you will appreciate a contrasting opinion.

I cannot compare this work to Aristotle's Poetics as another review can, I will compare it to Vladimir Nabokov's Lectures on Literature. Both works are publications made from lecture material by two established writers and thinkers. Both sets of lectures are intended to inform readers on how to better go about the work of being a reader. Nabokov and Eco are very nearly contemporaries. However Nabokov is best known as a writer and latterly as an instructor of literature. Eco is primarily a semiotcian given to highly esoteric analysis and `only' latterly as an author of popular novels.

Both Eco's Six Walks in the Fictional Woods, and Nabokov's Lectures on literature require a reader ready to work. Ultimately Nabokov is interesting in teaching and assisting. Eco is interested in name dropping, intellectual clutter, being clever and occasionally insightful. There are very good points in both books. I can recommend them both. I have more reservations with and frustrations with Eco.

Eco begins with several points about types of readers and writers. Once he settles in he has presented two basic approaches to reading. There are empirical readers, who want a literal, factual recitation and who are given to anticipating where an author it going to take the story. Alternately there are model readers who are open to whatever the author has to say and will follow behind the narrative limiting themselves to imagining only what the writer presents. This concept is divided into a few more types of model readers and there is some discussion of model writers but mostly these sets of complexities disappear. The initial concept is lost in a discussion how many or few detail the writer should include. Fundamentally this is about 5 pages of material to make a one page point. Here I suggest that the more pro-active mind of the empirical reader is a tool that a good writer can use either to trick the reader or to speed the reading processes. Absent a model reader, a writer will need `sell' his every point and invention. That is distinguishing these two types of reader makes for a fine intellectual point, but makes little advance on becoming a more aware reader.

Eco next introduces a concept parallel to and equally interesting as one made by Nabokov. Lectures on Literature argues the need for a reader to fully comprehend the space- the literary geography created by the author. Nabokov makes maps exactly from the text in his example books; be it the room where Kafka's Gregor Samsa finds himself turned into a beetle or the grounds around Jane Austin's Mansfield Park. Eco would have you spend as much effort on exactly defining the flow of time in a work. There is a two page example of how this chronology would appear and again there is a typology for the several kinds of time that are involved in a narrative. For example the time it takes the reader to read a section and the flow of time detailed in the narrative.

The case for both approaches are equally valid, but re-reading books until you have both time and space mapped out sounds like a guaranteed method to take the pleasure out of reading. Teacher, is it ok if I am mindful of these details and finish with a book before reducing it to its mechanical parts? Do we now need to create a literary altimeter to help us determine the distance between Dante's Hell below the reader and a Tom Clancy satellite in space?

Eco will expend most of a lecture on a problem in the Three Musketeers based on the impossibility of d'Artagnen taking a walk in detailed in the book and during the 17th Century Paris of the book, and arriving on the Rue Sarvadoni. Eco's point is that readers need to have rational mental points of reference if they are to follow the imaginary details of the writer's fiction. It is of passing interest that Eco adopts Nabokov's technique of making a map, but Eco makes his from a real Paris, whereas Nabokov restricts himself to the reality of the writer. Nabokov simplifies his argument by saying that in fiction: reality is what the writer needs it to be. The closest Eco come to being this direct is when he reminds the reader of the implied contract between writer and reader, termed: `Willing suspension of disbelief'. What happens to Eco's case if Dumas simply made a cartographic error and no one thought to check a street map much less to edit the text?

Eco ends with a great question. Simplified, and this book needs to be simplified: If presented with a set of pages, that relate a story; how can a reader determine if the story is fictional or factual. Eco admits that hypothetically, the narrative can be so constructed that no such determination can be made.

An included discussion of how a person's mind uses a techniques to add new information, called stories, to old stories to build an understanding of reality and that this same techniques shapes a reader's ability to accept or reject a writer's reality, Eco makes the following statement:
"We accept a story that our ancestors have handed down to us as being true, even though today we call these ancestors scientists"
I hope that this statement means something else in Umberto Eco's native Italian. It carries no meaning to me. There are other examples of these kinds of strange statements.

Both Eco's and Nabakovs lectures are worth reading. They complement each other. Eco is frustrating. He is given to more abstruse and academic thinking. Six Walks in the Fictional Woods should have been better
Gianni_Giant
Not too shabby as a craft book, but Eco can sometimes be full of himself and makes the explanations rather drawn out. My advice is to be prepared to be patient for Eco to make his points as you're going through it because there is some very useful information.
Flower
Six Walks is more accessible than I had expected (my copy is now heavily highlighted, marked up, and loaded with the little plastic stickies I use to flag ideas and references). Eco is speaking to readers and, thereby, equally to writers. The six Charles Elliot Norton lectures begin with the role time plays in fiction and end with the importance (to our perception of reality) of accuracy in writing fiction. This is weighty stuff made accessible by Eco's illustration by example: Yes, Dante, Shakespeare, and Kafka, but the writers who give us Hercule Poirot, Agent 007 and Little Red Riding Hood as well. If you read fiction or write fiction, the material will be useful and the book will please.
Malodor
A series of wonderful lectures.
Dog_Uoll
It's refreshing to finally hold a conversation with someone who has been tacking along similar literary lines and yet holds his own reservations- his own unique longings.
Dilmal
already reading it, thanks a lot.
Legend 33
Eco writes this book in response to Italo Calvino's thoughts on the same topic. His wit and wisdom inspire the authorial soul within me.
Six Walks in the Fictional Woods requires some effort from me but think could enlarge my appreciation of every kind of fiction.
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