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The Candidate: What It Takes to Win - and Hold - the White House ePub download

by Samuel L. Popkin

  • Author: Samuel L. Popkin
  • ISBN: 0199922071
  • ISBN13: 978-0199922079
  • ePub: 1605 kb | FB2: 1718 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (May 4, 2012)
  • Pages: 360
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 922
  • Format: txt mbr rtf mobi
The Candidate: What It Takes to Win - and Hold - the White House ePub download

In The Candidate, Professor Popkin teaches us what he's learned - the surprising secrets that separate winning .

In The Candidate, Professor Popkin teaches us what he's learned - the surprising secrets that separate winning campaigns from the ones that crash and burn. -George Stephanopoulos, Anchor and Chief Political Correspondent, ABC News. Popkin is that rare academic who can write a fast-moving, punchy book that rescues political science from spreadsheets and algorithms and thereby makes it interesting and captivating.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Candidate: What it Takes to Win .

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Candidate: What it Takes to Win - and Hold - the White House. Clinton Outmaneuvers Newt Gingrich In December 1995, the Republican controlled house and senate sent Bill Clinton a budget that would let Medicare, in Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich's words, "wither on the vine. With the same pen LBJ used to sign Medicare into law, Bill Clinton vetoed their budget, forcing a government shutdown.

Popkin Samuel L. (EN). There are two winners in every presidential election campaign: The inevitable winner when it begins-such as Rudy Giuliani or Hillary Clinton in 2008-and the inevitable victor after it ends. In The Candidate, Samuel Popkin explains the difference between them. The road to the White House is littered with geniuses of campaigns past.

Viii, 350 pages ; 25 cm. Looking at the last 60 years of races for the White House, Popkin analyzes why some "inevitable" winners lost and how dark horses won against long odds. All of the winners assembled smoothly working teams, were agile enough to respond quickly to hits, had a core of beliefs, and prepared years in advance. Includes bibliographical references and index

In The Candidate, Samuel Popkin explains the difference between them.

In The Candidate, Samuel Popkin explains the difference between them. While plenty of political insiders have written about specific campaigns, only Popkin-drawing on a l There are two winners in every presidential election campaign: The inevitable winner when it begins-such as Rudy Giuliani or Hillary Clinton in 2008-and the inevitable victor after it ends. Why doesn't practice make perfect?

In The Candidate, Samuel Popkin explains the difference between them. Why doesn't practice make perfect? Why is experience such a poor teacher? Why are the same mistakes replayed again and again?

Popkin has published in unusually diverse areas. His most recent book is The Candidate: What it Takes to Win (and Hold) the White House

Popkin has published in unusually diverse areas. His most recent book is The Candidate: What it Takes to Win (and Hold) the White House. Earlier he wrote The Reasoning Voter: Communication and Persuasion in Presidential Campaigns and co-authored Issues and Strategies: The Computer Simulation of Presidential Campaigns.

What It Takes to Win - and Hold - the White House. 350 pp. Oxford University Press. Correction: August 19, 2012. Nicholas Confessore is a political correspondent for The Times.

Request PDF On Apr 1, 2013, Kate Kenski and others published The Candidate: What It Takes to Win-and . Such changes affect neighborhood choices as well as aggregate prices and quantities in the housing market.

Such changes affect neighborhood choices as well as aggregate prices and quantities in the housing market. shock predominantly affecting d banks.

Political analyst and author of The Candidate: What it Takes to Win and Hold the White House, Samuel Popkin, takes us back through recent political history to portray incumbent presidents and the bold decisions that put them back in the Oval Office. Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически.

There are two winners in every presidential election campaign: The inevitable winner when it begins--such as Rudy Giuliani or Hillary Clinton in 2008--and the inevitable victor after it ends. In The Candidate, Samuel Popkin explains the difference between them.While plenty of political insiders have written about specific campaigns, only Popkin--drawing on a lifetime of presidential campaign experience and extensive research--analyzes what it takes to win the next campaign. The road to the White House is littered with geniuses of campaigns past. Why doesn't practice make perfect? Why is experience such a poor teacher? Why are the same mistakes replayed again and again? Based on detailed analyses of the winners--and losers--of the last 60 years of presidential campaigns, Popkin explains how challengers get to the White House, how incumbents stay there for a second term, and how successors hold power for their party. He looks in particular at three campaigns--George H.W. Bush's muddled campaign for reelection in 1992, Al Gore's flawed campaign for the presidency in 2000, and Hillary Clinton's mismanaged effort to win the nomination in 2008--and uncovers the lessons that Ronald Reagan can teach future candidates about teamwork. Throughout, Popkin illuminates the intricacies of presidential campaigns--the small details and the big picture, the surprising mistakes and the predictable miscues--in a riveting account of what goes on inside a campaign and what makes one succeed while another fails.As Popkin shows, a vision for the future and the audacity to run are only the first steps in a candidate's run for office. To truly survive the most grueling show on earth, presidential hopefuls have to understand the critical factors that Popkin reveals in The Candidate. In the wake of the 2012 election, Popkin's analysis looks remarkably prescient. Obama ran a strong incumbent-oriented campaign but made typical incumbent mistakes, as evidenced by his weak performance in the first debate. The Romney campaign correctly put power in the hands of a strong campaign manager, but it couldn't overcome the weaknesses of the candidate.
Leyl
As Samuel Popkin notes early in his book "The Candidate," it is frequently the case that a presidential candidate considered likely to be the next president a year or two before the election ends up losing badly when the votes are actually counted. In particular, Popkin examines the candidacies of George H.W. Bush in 1992, Al Gore in 2000, and Hillary Clinton in 2008 to look for answers as to why favorites in elections many times do not win.

The author sets forth the traits that candidates need to be successful. He asserts that a prospective president must be part monarch, part visionary, and part CEO, and the candidate must also have a strong team of advisers and staffers. Popkin looks at the different problems that candidates running as incumbents, challengers, and successors have to face, and notes the differences between running as a governor, senator, general or hero, and vice president.

Popkin closes by offering his opinion on whether our very long presidential selection process if beneficial or harmful. Anyone remotely interested in presidential politics would enjoy "The Candidate."
Shistus
Samuel Popkin is One of the great analysts of Presidential campaigns, and this book His understanding of what it takes for an individual to run for the presidency. It is a well-written, devastating study of the grueling life, the organizational complexity, and the the endlessly shifting moments of modern presidential campaigns from the perspective of the would-be part nominees. An excellent, well considered work.
Kefym
I wanted to love this book, and I agree with other reviews that the introduction and the "packaging" of this content are good. Yet as a self-proclaimed political junkie, I have read a lot of the primary sources that this author used to piece together entire sections. For example, the chapter called "The Challenger Who Couldn't Lose" about Clinton v. Obama '08 is sourced heavily by the infamous Game Change book by Heilemann and Halperin as well as the book by WaPo Journalist Dan Balz. If you've read those (as I have) and others like them from historical campaigns, skip this one. Otherwise, this might be your cup of tea if you're into understanding the machinery behind modern politics.
Owomed
The Candidate is a fair book--decently entertaining, but by no means earth-shattering. Here's the gist: the best campaign usually wins, but no two campaign seasons are the same. Thus, with the exception of some basics (a good candidate who is comfortable delegating, a strong chief of staff, a team that works together), there's no exact way to win or even prepare. Not surprising, right? I bought this because I read that the Obama staff had each received a copy. I've worked in campaigns for a long time, and few insights in the book struck me as particularly insightful or perceptive. There are some interesting anecdotes, however, so if you aren't familiar with American campaigns generally, this book might appeal to you.
Black_Hawk_Down
pretty good but repetitive. a little trite. i found the title misleading. a profile of lots of losing candidates would have been better.the dewey analasis was poor.
Thorgahuginn
Samuel Popkin, with political as well as solid academic credentials, pulls off the difficult trick of explaining contemporary presidential politics -- not as the theoreticians or talking heads might like politics to be -- but politics as they really are. This is an excellent book on many levels.
krot
In an election year, everyone wants to have insight into which candidate is likely to succeed so they can be the one to predict the election. Invariably, every year pundits of all political stripes make predictions before the election, and when proven wrong afterwards, proclaim that the results were "obvious". Popkin's book serves this role from his insightful position as an adviser to Carter, McGovern, Clinton, and Gore. Despite the fact he is obviously a Democrat, the book is not a political analysis of one party versus another but rather a discussion on the nature of the political process itself.

In my mind, Popkin does not really tell you what it takes to win the White House, but more what it takes to lose the White House. To borrow a phrase from Anna Karenina, successful campaigns are all alike; every failed campaign fails in its own way. Through examining the failed campaigns of Carter, George HW Bush, Gore, and Hillary Clinton, he finds that each had their own failings and reason that they were not successful campaigners. Popkin leads us to his conclusion that should be eminently obvious - we tend to vote for the person who is the best campaigner, not the person we think will govern the best. Hillary was obviously infinitely more qualified than a freshman senator without any accomplishments of his own, but she was a worse campaigner as Popkin explains in intricate detail.

While the book is a good history, it fails in the title to explain exactly what it takes to "win and hold" the White House. It's an election year, yet I cannot look at either the Obama or Romney campaigns and proclaim I know how it will end based on Popkin's insights. In fact, Popkin reminds me of the book Everything Is Obvious: *Once You Know the Answer. He analyzes why Gore lost, but had 300 people in Florida voted differently, he'd be analyzing why Bush lost. It seems hard to make sweeping generalizations on one man's failure based on a few hundred votes in a single state.

If Romney wins, Popkin's next book can discuss how it was obvious Obama would lose. If Obama wins, it will be equally obvious that Romney could never win. Either way, there will be facts that can be spun after the fact to explain why the outcome was so clear.

The history in this book was fascinating, but the conclusions are a little broadly stated. It seems the most important thing is to have the candidate stay out of day-to-day operations and leave it to professionals. Indeed, Popkin details how Obama basically acted out the campaign that Axelrod and Plouffe put together. Hillary tried to run her own campaign and failed miserably. But these professionals can't have their own aspirations of grandeur, or he says they will sink the candidate like Sununu (and although he doesn't mention it, Schmidt in 2008). I recommend you read the book to gain insight into history you won't find elsewhere, but don't expect to come out of it knowing exactly how a person goes about winning a presidential campaign.
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