» » Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius

Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius ePub download

by May Sim

  • Author: May Sim
  • ISBN: 0521870933
  • ISBN13: 978-0521870931
  • ePub: 1320 kb | FB2: 1854 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (June 18, 2007)
  • Pages: 240
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 532
  • Format: doc docx mbr lrf
Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius ePub download

In some ways, Aristotle and Confucius seem like promising subjects for comparative philosophy. In this book, May Sim begins by arguing against those who see Confucius as fundamentally unlike Aristotle.

In some ways, Aristotle and Confucius seem like promising subjects for comparative philosophy. However, Aristotle and Confucius have importantly different conceptions of what it is to live well. She says that Confucius's "commonsense" view of the self and reality is not identical with that of Aristotle, but is generally consistent with it.

Remastering Morals provides a book-length scholarly comparison of the ethics of Aristotle and Confucius.

Remastering Morals provides a book-length scholarly comparison of the ethics of Aristotle and Confucius. May Sim's comparisons offer fresh interpretations of the central teachings of both men. More than a catalog of similarities and differences, her study brings two great traditions into dialog so that each is able to learn from the other.

May Sim s book is an impressive achievement and should be read by anyone interested in Confucius, Aristotle, or the project of comparative philosophy. May Sim is associate professor of philosophy at College of the Holy Cross. -Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy". She has contributed to International Philosophical Quarterly, Journal of Chinese Philosophy, History of Philosophy Quarterly, and Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy.

May Sim’s new book Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius is a much needed work-it brings together two founding fathers of their own respective civilizations in the East and the West, Confucius and Aristotle, in a comparative study

May Sim’s new book Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius is a much needed work-it brings together two founding fathers of their own respective civilizations in the East and the West, Confucius and Aristotle, in a comparative study. Their works have set the basic tones of Western and Chinese philosophies, and their far-reaching influences are both regaining visible vitality today. Yet until May Sim’s work there was no systematic comparative study done between these two.

Aristotle and Confucius are pivotal figures in world history; nevertheless, Western and Eastern cultures have in modern times largely abandoned the insights of these masters. Remastering Morals provides a book-length scholarly. Aristotle and Confucius are pivotal figures in world history; nevertheless, Western and Eastern cultures have in modern times largely abandoned the insights of these masters. Remastering Morals provides a book-length scholarly comparison of the ethics of Aristotle and Confucius. More th Aristotle and Confucius are pivotal figures in world history; nevertheless, Western and Eastern cultures have in modern times largely abandoned the insights of these masters.

Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius. The Ethics of Confucius and Aristotle, Mirrors of Virtue. New York and London: Routledge. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

May Sim's book is an impressive achievement and should be read by anyone interested in Confucius, Aristotle, or the .

May Sim's book is an impressive achievement and should be read by anyone interested in Confucius, Aristotle, or the project of comparative philosophy. -Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy. May Sim's book is an impressive achievement and should be read by anyone interested in Confucius, Aristotle, or the project of comparative philosophy

Remastering Morals provides a book-length scholarly comparison of the ethics of Aristotle and Confucius. More than a catalog of similarities and differences. May Sim's book is an impressive achievement and should be read by anyone interested in Confucius, Aristotle, or the project of comparative philosophy.

Aristotle and Confucius are pivotal figures in world history; nevertheless, Western and Eastern cultures have in modern times largely abandoned the insights of these masters. Remastering Morals provides a book-length scholarly comparison of the ethics of Aristotle and Confucius. May Sim's comparisons offer fresh interpretations of the central teachings of both men. More than a catalog of similarities and differences, her study brings two great traditions into dialog so that each is able to learn from the other. This is essential reading for anyone interested in virtue-oriented ethics.
Flarik
This book is part of Sim's larger project of dialoging across a variety of traditions in ethics to see how one tradition, can challenge, supplement or correct another. The book has an interesting answer to how Confucianism can benefit from interactions with Aristotelians and vice versa. Of particular interest is her challenge to those, like MacIntyre, who hold that these two traditions have incommensurable differences that would block or significantly hinder mutual understanding. I highly recommend this book, it is sensitive to important nuances of both Aristotelian and Confucian thought.
Jazu
thanks.
net rider
In some ways, Aristotle and Confucius seem like promising subjects for comparative philosophy. Both emphasize the cultivation of virtue and flexible responsiveness to concrete situations over abstract moral rules. However, Aristotle and Confucius have importantly different conceptions of what it is to live well. For Aristotle, the life of the theoretical scholar (the scientist or philosopher) can be intrinsically worthwhile, and the family exists only as a tool for producing and maintaining virtuous individuals. In contrast, Confucius thinks that learning must always be in the service of society, and full virtue can be exercised just by being a good father, mother, son or daughter. Furthermore, some have argued that Confucius is actually more like "postmodern" critics of Aristotle than Aristotle himself.

In this book, May Sim begins by arguing against those who see Confucius as fundamentally unlike Aristotle. She says that Confucius's "commonsense" view of the self and reality is not identical with that of Aristotle, but is generally consistent with it. She then goes into a detailed comparison, noting (with a subtle eye) the similarities and differences between Aristotle and Confucius. She focuses in particular on four issues: virtue as a "mean" between extremes (e.g., courage is a mean between rashness and cowardice), the characteristics of the ethical "self," the connection between politics and virtue, and the relationship between friendship and virtue.

This book is written in an accessible manner, so non-scholars can understand it. However, it does go into detail on some technical issues, so it is not for casual readers unwilling to read slowly and thoughtfully. For those interested in comparative philosophy and willing to make the effort, I recommend this book strongly.

Incidentally, this book is one of three dealing with Confucianism and Aristotelianism that came out in 2007. The other two are The Ethics of Confucius and Aristotle: Mirrors of Virtue and Virtue Ethics and Consequentialism in Early Chinese Philosophy. In addition, Mencius and Aquinas: Theories of Virtue and Conceptions of Courage was a groundbreaking earlier study on a related topic.
E-Books Related to Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius: