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The Thin Red Line (Philosophers on Film) ePub download

by David Davies

  • Author: David Davies
  • ISBN: 0415773652
  • ISBN13: 978-0415773652
  • ePub: 1382 kb | FB2: 1299 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (September 10, 2008)
  • Pages: 128
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 662
  • Format: rtf txt txt rtf
The Thin Red Line (Philosophers on Film) ePub download

The Thin Red Line is the third feature-length film from acclaimed director Terrence Malick.

The Thin Red Line is the third feature-length film from acclaimed director Terrence Malick. Routledge's 'Philosophers on Film" series - of which I believe this was the first volume to appear - is a welcome alternative to the more lightweight pop culture and philosophy books that have come to crowd the philosophy shelves at bookstores. The essays are a bit more serious in tone, and tend to exhibit a more careful approach to working through the issues, as they are intended for audiences with some background in philosophy, rather than for those who are merely interested in a light dose of deep thought.

Philosophers on Film. The Thin Red Line" is the third feature-length film from acclaimed director Terrence Malick, set during the struggle between American and Japanese forces for Guadalcanal in the South Pacific during World War Two.

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9 30111 The Thin Red Line is essential reading for students interested in philosophy 1 and film or phenomenology and . Philosophers on Film. The true significance of film for philosophy, and of philosophy for film, cannot be established in abstract or general terms

9 30111 The Thin Red Line is essential reading for students interested in philosophy 1 and film or phenomenology and existentialism. 4 Contributors: Simon Critchley, Hubert Dreyfus and Camilo Prince, 5 David Davies, Amy Coplan, Iain Macdonald. The true significance of film for philosophy, and of philosophy for film, cannot be established in abstract or general terms.

The Thin Red Line is a 1998 American epic war film written and directed by Terrence Malick. It is the second screen adaptation of the 1962 novel of the same name by James Jones, following the 1964 film; however, this film is not considered a remake. It is the second screen adaptation of the 1962 novel of the same name by James Jones, following the 1964 film; however, this film is not considered a remake

The Thin Red Line is the third feature-length film from acclaimed director Terrence Malick, set during the struggle between American and Japanese forces for Guadalcanal in the South Pacific during World War Two. It is a powerful, enigmatic and complex film that raises important philosophical questions, ranging from the existential and phenomenological to the artistic and technical. This is the first collection dedicated to exploring the philosophical aspects of Malick's film.

The Thin Red Line is essential reading for students interested in philosophy and film or phenomenology and existentialism. The Thin Red Line Philosophers on Film. Contributors: Simon Critchley, Hubert Dreyfus and Camilo Prince, David Davies, Amy Coplan, Iain Macdonald.

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Items related to The Thin Red Line (Philosophers on Film) . David Davies is a Professor in the Department of Philosophy at McGill University, Canada. The Thin Red Line is an intense and illuminating collection of essays, covering a breadth of approaches to this film, ranging from philosophical film analysis motivated by a Heideggerian approach to an in-depth discussion of filmic techniques.

Philosophers on Film Released in 1999, Fight Club is David Fincher’s popular adaption of Chuck . Released in 1999, Fight Club is David Fincher’s popular adaption of Chuck Palahniuk’s cult novel, and one of the most philosophically rich films of recent years. The Thin Red Line is the third feature-length film from acclaimed director Terrence Malick, set during the struggle between American and Japanese forces for Guadalcanal in the South Pacific during World War Two.

The Thin Red Line is the third feature-length film from acclaimed director Terrence Malick, set during the struggle between American and Japanese forces for Guadalcanal in the South Pacific during World War Two. It is a powerful, enigmatic and complex film that raises important philosophical questions, ranging from the existential and phenomenological to the artistic and technical.

This is the first collection dedicated to exploring the philosophical aspects of Malick’s film. Opening with a helpful introduction that places the film in context, five essays, four of which were specially commissioned for this collection, go on to examine the following:

the exploration of Heideggerian themes– such as being-towards-death and the vulnerability of Dasein’s world–in The Thin Red Line

how Malick’s film explores and cinematically expresses the embodied nature of our experience of, and agency in, the world

Malick’s use of cinematic techniques, and how the style of his images shapes our affective, emotional, and cognitive responses to the film

the role that images of nature play in Malick’s cinema, and his ‘Nietzschean’ conception of human nature.

The Thin Red Line is essential reading for students interested in philosophy and film or phenomenology and existentialism. It also provides an accessible and informative insight into philosophy for those in related disciplines such as film studies, literature and religion.

Contributors: Simon Critchley, Hubert Dreyfus and Camilo Prince, David Davies, Amy Coplan, Iain Macdonald.

Keth
Terrence Malick's "The Thin Red Line" is a gorgeous, thought-provoking, and deeply enigmatic movie. I've seen it 5 or 6 times and never get tired of it. The images, sounds, and voiceovers just lodge in your head.

This short book (also called "The Thin Red Line") consists of essays by academic philosophers who love the movie and want to make sense of it. Unfortunately, the essays read like works-in-progress prepared for a grad school seminar. For the most part, they are half-baked, pedantic, narrow, and filled with barely-explained references to heavy concepts like "embodied cognition" and to heavy thinkers like Heidegger and Nietzsche. In spite of its short length, the book manages to feel repetitive and padded. The last essay doesn't even deal with "The Thin Red Line" at all. Instead, it analyzes Malick's next movie, "The New World" -- arguing, cleverly but laughably, that the movie has deliberate references to the Disney children's cartoon "Pocahontas." It isn't clear why it's in the book.

That said, the book is short -- it's barely 100 pages -- and can be read in 4 or 5 hours. My recommendation to fans of the movie: Get a cheap copy of the book, read the essays by Critchley and Dreyfus (which actually do deepen one's understanding of the movie), and then see the movie again. That would be the best investment of your time.

Consumer note: Anyone who'd pay $110 for a hardcover copy of this book should have his head examined. I don't think even a film library could justify the expense. What motivates publishers to charge prices like this? It's not like philosophy profs earn huge royalties from having essays published.
jorik
The difficult but beautiful film that marked the re-emergence of Terrence Malick after a 20-year absence was met with some critical acclaim, but also a lot of confusion. The Thin Red Line was heralded as an epic war film, but its treatment of war itself is secondary to its reflection on war's impact on the inner lives of a number of soldiers, and on the outer world of nature that appeared indifferent to the violence and chaos that threw human lives into disarray. It is not surprising that philosophers have taken a special interest in the film, both because Terrence Malick himself once trained as a philosopher, and because many of the voiceovers that serve as his trademark reflect the impact of philosophical themes. Routledge's 'Philosophers on Film" series - of which I believe this was the first volume to appear - is a welcome alternative to the more lightweight pop culture and philosophy books that have come to crowd the philosophy shelves at bookstores. The essays are a bit more serious in tone, and tend to exhibit a more careful approach to working through the issues, as they are intended for audiences with some background in philosophy, rather than for those who are merely interested in a light dose of deep thought.

The best essays here are the one by Simon Critchley and another by the editor of the volume, David Davies. Simon Critchley explores the meaning of the "calm" in the face of death that the character Witt ascribed to his mother, and in which he found the immortality that he hadn't seen evidence for elsewhere. David Davies explores the tactile dimension of The Thin Red Line and the ways in which it captures directly the sense of an embodied agency. Other essays include one by Bert Dreyfus and Camilo Salazar Prince, that explores the film's depiction of a distinction they attribute (falsely, I think) to Heidegger, between "ontic demise" (death of the organism) and a kind of "ontological death" (loss of identity and world collapse) that individuals and cultures can "live through" (I say "falsely" because both of these seem "ontic" in the sense I understand from Heidegger). Amy Coplan claims that the film emphasizes the evocation of emotion over traditional narrative clarity, but her discussion of the techniques used in the film doesn't go very far to explain how or why the film evokes the emotions she attributes to it. The concluding essay by Iain McDonald moves on to Malick's subsequent film, The New World, and uses the Nietzschean notion of the "will to power" to explore Malick's depiction of nature in that film. Perhaps most interesting (but not entirely convincing) is McDonald's claim that Malick's inclusion of a sentimentalized romance between Pocahantas and Smith is intended to evoke the Disney version of the story in such a way as to ironically undermine its mythical dimensions.

All in all it's a provocative and intriguing collection, worth studying for both those interested in the film and those interested in the potential of film to explore philosophical themes.
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