» » Dark Water: Flood and Redemption in the City of Masterpieces

Dark Water: Flood and Redemption in the City of Masterpieces ePub download

by Robert Clark

  • Author: Robert Clark
  • ISBN: 076792648X
  • ISBN13: 978-0767926485
  • ePub: 1591 kb | FB2: 1958 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Doubleday; 1 edition (October 7, 2008)
  • Pages: 368
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 882
  • Format: docx lrf mbr doc
Dark Water: Flood and Redemption in the City of Masterpieces ePub download

Clark provides a unique twist on the horrific flood that ravaged Florence on November 4, 1966, killing 33 people, leaving . Robert Clark's Dark Water is an excellent history of the city of Florence through the centuries, culminating with the 1966 flood and the subsequent recovery.

Clark provides a unique twist on the horrific flood that ravaged Florence on November 4, 1966, killing 33 people, leaving countless numbers homeless, and damaging a huge number of priceless art treasures and rare books. Instead of merely recounting the devastation, he reaches back into the past, analyzing the historical dichotomy between Firenze, the city where natives live and work, and Florence, the art mecca students, scholars, and tourists flock to visit.

Dark Water brings the flood and its aftermath to life through the voices of witnesses past and present. On November 4, 1966, Florence, one of the world’s most historic cities and the repository of perhaps its greatest art, was struck by a monumental calamity.

Includes bibliographical references and index

Includes bibliographical references and index. Describes the November 1966 flood that inundated the city of Florence and its devastating impact on some of the Western world's finest collections of art, and details the vast global efforts to preserve and restore the city's treasures in the wake of theflood.

The stories of people experiencing the flood and the vast effort afterwards to restore the art work and books that were damaged were the most interesting parts of the book, I thought

The stories of people experiencing the flood and the vast effort afterwards to restore the art work and books that were damaged were the most interesting parts of the book, I thought. Clark spends the last few chapters on his later trips to Florence and his musings on art in general.

But I know more now, thanks to Robert Clark’s Dark Water. It was carved in the same squarish, Roman script you see in other inscriptions on walls around the city. In 2005, Clark and his family had been living in Florence for two months. On one seemingly ordinary day, he embarked on that most prosaic of errands: bill paying, which in this instance had to be done at the local post office. They usually seem to be quotations from Dante marking places where he perhaps saw Beatrice; where an eminent family or personage that he later met in Purgatory or, more likely, Hell once lived; or a simple stanza of his heroic melancholy, connected to nothing more than Florence, the glory and pity of it.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years. Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 4. 2% restored. Главная Dark Water: Flood and Redemption in the City of Masterpieces

Электронная книга "Dark Water: Flood and Redemption in Florence-The City of Masterpieces", Robert Clark.

Электронная книга "Dark Water: Flood and Redemption in Florence-The City of Masterpieces", Robert Clark. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Dark Water: Flood and Redemption in Florence-The City of Masterpieces" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Compensation paid to us in the form of referral fees DOES NOT imply that companies wishing to appear on our pages are receiving any form of endorsement from us. Got it.

Tags: s-Art Art Books. Dark Water: Flood and Redemption in the City of Masterpieces. Home Books Robert Clark. Ranked out of 950 in s-Art. Compensation paid to us in the form of referral fees DOES NOT imply that companies wishing to appear on our pages are receiving any form of endorsement from us. Do you wish to advertise with us?

Some forty later, Dark Waters, by historian and author Robert Clark, remembers those dramatic days of the flood and the silver . It was by chance that America-born Clark became aware of the flood and what it really meant.

Some forty later, Dark Waters, by historian and author Robert Clark, remembers those dramatic days of the flood and the silver lining that came with them-the thousands of young volunteers who flocked to Florence from every corner of the world to help rescue the city and its artistic treasures, quickly earning the nickname of Angeli del Fango, mud angels.

This dramatic, beautifully written account of the flood that ravaged Florence, Italy, in 1966 weaves heartbreaking tales of the disaster and stories of the heroic global efforts to save the city’s treasures against the historic background of Florence’s glorious art.On November 4, 1966, Florence, one of the world’s most historic cities and the repository of perhaps its greatest art, was struck by a monumental calamity. A low-pressure system had been stalled over Italy for six weeks and on the previous day it had begun to rain again. Nineteen inches fell in twenty-four hours, more than half of the annual total. By two o’clock in the morning twenty-thousand cubic feet of water per second was moving towards Florence. Soon manhole covers in Santa Croce were exploding into the air as jets of water began shooting out of the now overwhelmed sewer system. Cellars, vaults, and strong-rooms were filling with water. Night watchmen on the Ponte Vecchio alerted the bridge’s jewelers and goldsmiths to come quickly to rescue their wares. By then the water was moving at forty miles per hour at a height of twenty-four feet. At 7:26 a.m. all of Florence’s electric civic clocks came to a stop. The Piazza Santa Croce was under twenty-two feet of water. Beneath the surface, twelve feet of mud, sewage, debris, and oil sludge were starting to ooze and settle into the cellars and crypts and room after room above them. Six-hundred-thousand tons of it would smother, clot, and encrust the city. Dark Water brings the flood and its aftermath to life through the voices of witnesses past and present. Two young American artists wade heedlessly through the inundated city carrying their baby in order to witness its devastated beauty: the Ponte Vecchio buried in debris and Ghiberti’s panels from the doors of the Florence Baptistery, lying heaped in yard-deep mud; the swamped Uffizi Gallery; and, in the city libraries, one billion pages of Renaissance and antique books, soaked in mire. A Life magazine photographer, stowing away on an army helicopter, arrives to capture a drama that, he felt, “could only be told by Dante” amid the flooded tombs of Machiavelli and Michelangelo in Giotto and Vasari’s Santa Croce. A British student, one of thousands of “mud angels” who rushed to Florence to save its art, spends a month scraping mud and mold from Cimabue’s magnificent and neglected Crocifisso as intrigues and infighting among international art experts and connoisseurs swirl around him. And during the fortieth anniversary commemorations of 2006 the author asks himself why art matters so very much to us, and how beauty seems to somehow save the world even in the face of overwhelming disaster.

Rageseeker
When I was nine years old I saw pictures in the old Life magazine of a terrible flood that had just devastated an Italian city I had never heard of: Florence. Although I knew nothing of the masterpieces that had been damaged or destroyed, I realized that the world had suffered a great loss. Eight years later, as a teenager making my first trip to Europe, I visited Florence and saw the massive recovery and restoration efforts still underway. Florence meant more to me then, as I had just studied the Renaissance, and in the years since I have come to realize how important that rather small Italian city has been to the world's artistic, literary and spiritual development. Robert Clark's Dark Water is an excellent history of the city of Florence through the centuries, culminating with the 1966 flood and the subsequent recovery.

If Clark had only focused on 1966 and afterwards, this would still be an important work, but Dark Water is still more valuable because Clark has produced a fine history of the city, beginning with Dante, proceeding through the Renaissance, and on through to the present. He provides many excellent short biographies of the creative spirits associated with Florence, ranging from Leonardo and Michelangelo through to David Lees and Bernard Berenson. His accounts of Florence's participation in and witnessing of hundreds of years of history are also fascinating, particularly his coverage of the World War II period and the efforts made to preserve the city's treasures in the middle of massive conflict. His description of the 1966 flood and its aftermath is a gripping almost minute by minute account, and again features many hitherto unknown heroes of the recovery effort.

It would have been nice to have illustrations of the many artworks mentioned in this work and portraits of the many heroes and heroines who figure in Florence's history, and the book badly needs an index as well, but these are minor flaws, particularly when one considers Clark's fine writing style and his ability to create an engrossing narrative.
Gorisar
... for anyone with even the most passing interest in Florence and Italian art and art history. The book is sweeping in its multiple levels comprising: a history of Florence; biographies of some key people in her history including as recently as Bernard Berenson; a dramatic account of the flood in which the Arno becomes an alive, humanoid beast; reflections on "Florence" as romanticized by art lovers and "Firenze" as lived in day-by-day by its savvy cynical citizens; descriptions and ruminations about art restoration; a paean to the legions of young "mud angels" (angeli del fango) who descended on the city to help in the cleanup; enshrinement for history of other unsung heroes - and victims - and much more, not least the author's lucid, poetic prose. I don't give the book a fifth star for two reasons. As others have noted, it cries for more illustrations, and maps, for example of the Arno's whole course. And organizationally the book does jump around somewhat. But it is so rich that it is, again, a must-read. By instilling a new awe and reverence in the reader for that city's storied history - as well as for the irrepressible Florentines - it makes Florence "yours."

Reviewers note: I served in the U.S. Navy in Italy in 1965-67 and had the opportunity to visit Florence multiple times including for New Year's 1967 a few weeks after the flood. Even then the aftermath-situation was dramatic especially in the low-lying Santa Croce quarter. Piazza della Signoria was by then pretty cleaned up and the Palazzo Vecchio's windows were illuminated top to bottom with candles. At the stroke of midnight Il Duomo's big bell boomed and echoed from Giotto's Campanile down the quiet streets. Florence lived on. An unforgettable experience.
Gardataur
When people think about water threatening an Italian city, they think of Venice. The River Arno and ceaseless rains have been a disastrous threat to the Renaissance jewel that is Florence since 1333, when records of flooding commenced. In November of 1966 flood waters gushed over the altar in the Duomo, Santa Croce was inundated with 20'of mud and water; a population in peril. Florence was literally drowning in despair, in mourning for lost lives and lost masterpieces,and then the "mud angels" arrived from all over the world to help save the florentine birthrite. I was in Florence in 1970, 4 years after this disaster and the water marks were still fresh on the ancient stones. Robert Clark takes us thru this unified struggle against nature that allows Florence to live and breathe today.
net rider
Interesting story, and not just about the flood. It was amazing to read this book while visiting Florence for six weeks as I could visit in person the places the author described. It really made the history come alive for me and I learned much more about the city, and about Italy, than I would have otherwise. I will re-read it to bring back great memories of my visit. If you are visiting Florence or just have an interest in Italy, I recommend this book.
Jube
I read this book several years ago and loved it so much that I've just picked it up again. I love the way it morphs from one kind of reporting to another--or, to be more accurate, it contains a lovely blend of biography, history, and memoir. I love the epic scope of the work. I love its detail, the feeling it gives me that I'm actually living in Florence, that I'm watching as great art is restored. I love the English prose. Robert Clark is a consummate writer, one of the great twenty-first century masters of the language.
Irostamore
Been to or going to Florence? Then this is a must read. It will help to prepare you to better understand one important aspect of Florentine life: the floods over the centuries. And the floods each time changed Florence. Never for the good.
E-Books Related to Dark Water: Flood and Redemption in the City of Masterpieces: