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What Did the Internment of Japanese Americans Mean? (Historians at Work) ePub download

by Roger Daniels,Alice Yang Murray

  • Author: Roger Daniels,Alice Yang Murray
  • ISBN: 0312228163
  • ISBN13: 978-0312228163
  • ePub: 1451 kb | FB2: 1991 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (June 1, 2000)
  • Pages: 163
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 644
  • Format: docx mobi lrf lit
What Did the Internment of Japanese Americans Mean? (Historians at Work) ePub download

Some of the topics include why were Japanese Americans interned; What caused the Supreme Court to affirm the constitutionality of internment; why did the US intern people from Central and South America; how did some Japanese Americans resist internment, and what was the impact of internment on Japanese American families and communities? .

book by Alice Yang Murray. During World War II, over 120,000 Japanese Americans were removed and confined for four years in sixteen camps located throughout the western half of the United States. Yet the internment of Japanese Americans in concentration camps remains a largely unknown episode of World War II history. Indeed, many of the internees themselves do not wish to speak of it, even to their own family members.

In these selections, Alice Yang Murray investigates the . Original Title. What Did the Internment of Japanese Americans Mean? (Historians at Work). government's role in planning and carrying out the removal and internment of thousands of citizens, resident aliens, and foreign nationals, and the ways in which Japanese Americans coped with or resisted their removal and incarceration. 0312228163 (ISBN13: 9780312228163).

During World War II, over 120,000 Japanese Americans were removed and confined for four years in 16 camps located throughout the western half of the United States.

The selections explore the .

by Alice Yang Murray. Published April 21, 2000 by Bedford/St.

What Did the Internment of Japanese Americans Mean? (Historians at Wor. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove What Did the Internment of Japanese Americans Mean? (Historians at Work) from your list? What Did the Internment of Japanese Americans Mean? (Historians at Work). by Alice Yang Murray.

Alice Yang Murray is a passionate humanitarian, historian and while her surname Yang tells us she is she is of. .This omitted bias is in stark contrast to the historians whom have covered the subject of internment in the past.

Alice Yang Murray is a passionate humanitarian, historian and while her surname Yang tells us she is she is of Asian or more specifically Chinese decent she does not allow this supposed bias to detract from her factual analysis.

During World War II, over 120,000 Japanese Americans were removed and confined four years in sixteen camps located throughout the western half of the United States. Yet the internment of Japanese Americans in concentration camps remains a largely unknown episode of World War II history. In these selections, Alice Yang Murray investigates the U.S. government's role in planning and carrying out the removal and internment of thousands of citizens, resident aliens, and foreign nationals, and the ways in which Japanese Americans coped with or resisted their removal and incarceration.
Corgustari
This a required reading for a college history class, but was actually readable, not boring and full of info that you would remember
Ustamya
This Review refers to the paperback edition of "What Did the Internment of Japanese Americans Mean? (Historians at Work)", composed by Roger Daniels, Peter Irons, Michi Weglyn, Gary Y. Okihiro, and Valerie J. Matsumoto and as compiled by Alice Yang Murray.
Murray's book is a compilation of several selections from prominent scholars and authors concerning the plight of those of Japanese descent caught in the Americas during World War II. A brief introduction providing insights into the lives of the authors and several questions accompany each selection. There is also a brief historical background of the internment preceding the selections. Murray provides an extensive list of other works witch may aid the reader in further studies of the topics represented following the selections. The book contains the following excerpts by the following authors; "The Decision for Mass Evacuation" - Roger Daniels, "Gordon Hirabayashi v. United States: A Jap's a Jap" - Peter Irons, "Hostages" - Michi Weglyn, "Tule Lake under Martial Law: A Study in Japanese Resistance" - Gary Y. Okihiro, and "Amache" - Valerie J. Matsumoto.
Murray does an admirable job of portraying to the reader popular interpretations and general historical facts regarding the internment. The topics range from the constitutional laws broken by the internment, to the transfer of Latin Americans of Japanese descent to the United States so that the U.S. could barter them for Allied POWs. The book presents popular views of the Americans interned and their reactions to internment, giving the reader a well-rounded look at the current debate over the subject. Each selection is unique and proves invaluable in regards to understanding the internment and its implications on modern society.
Each literary style is quite original therefore denoting that each style will need proper review. Murray writes in an average style, creating places where the sentence structure can be somewhat awkward. The author periodically goes back and forth between present and past tense, but does do a good job of conveying the topic at hand. The compositional style Daniels uses is quite assertive and conveys a more radical tone, he also seems to generally dislike lawyers - often bringing this dislike into his work, causing the reader general annoyance. However he provides proof to back up his statements and uses an otherwise gripping literary style that keeps the reader interested. Irons writes in a very professional tone, and presents the topics without extreme biases resulting in a well-written work. Weglyn presents a descriptive work, which at times appears to have a bit of anger behind it. Okihiro is slightly vindictive, often targeting other prominent authors and dismissing their work as incorrect. He presents a rather compelling work, but his single mindedness taints it. Matsumoto is very open minded, relating to the reader the wide spectrum of opinion instead of the lone mindset promoted by other authors. However, she sometimes overuses some of her sources, which slightly detracts from the work.
"What Did the Internment of Japanese Americans Mean? (Historians at Work)" makes for an excellent introduction to the various facets of internment, but is not a precise work on any individual realm of the subject. Murray's work is a necessary overview and resource for anyone, both seasoned experts and casual readers, interested in one of the darkest chapters of American history.
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