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The Handbook of Japanese Verbs (Kodansha Dictionary) ePub download

by Taeko Kamiya

  • Author: Taeko Kamiya
  • ISBN: 1568364849
  • ISBN13: 978-1568364841
  • ePub: 1768 kb | FB2: 1516 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Kodansha International; Reprint, Bilingual edition (November 16, 2012)
  • Pages: 256
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 760
  • Format: mbr lit lrf rtf
The Handbook of Japanese Verbs (Kodansha Dictionary) ePub download

Other books in this series. The Handbook Of Japanese Verbs

By (author) Taeko Kamiya. Other books in this series. The Handbook Of Japanese Verbs. TAEKO KAMIYA received a BA for Doshisha Women's College (Kyoto) and MAs from the University of San Francisco in education and from the Monterey Institute of International Studies in linguistics.

free ebooks book777. The dictionary form of a regular I verb has a consonant plus u ending. com ww. DICTIONARY A KODANSHA THE HANDBOOK OF JAPANESE VERBS Taeko Kamiya author of The Handbook of Japanese Adjectives and Adverbs ww. book777. com free ebooks ww.

Start by marking The Handbook of Japanese Verbs as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Handbook of Japanese Verbs as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The Introduction takes the first step toward comprehension by pointing out the features of Japanese verbs that stand in contrast to their English counterparts, such as tense, politeness level, auxiliaries, and transitive and intransitive forms.

The Handbook of Japanese Verbs (Kodansha Dictionary) by Taeko Kamiya. 1. Japanese Particle Workbook by Taeko Kamiya. I know many people find Japanese particles one of the most difficult aspects in their lessons. Most people find Japanese verbs very complicated as compared to English verbs. This is the reference book you will need if you want a thorough understanding of Japanese verbs. It shows the tables and detailed explanation on how verbs are categorized and conjugated. They are not sure of which particle to use in different situations and do not understand why sometimes one particle can be used to replace another particle.

Learn Japanese with the Handbook. Pick and choose which patterns to want to remember from these books. 2. Focus your efforts on telling stories, giving ns, and writing articles/essays. 3. Read novels to pick up vocabulary used to express emotion or describe details.

Pages with related products. See and discover other items: japanese verbs.

Publisher: Kodansha USA (1767). Pages with related products.

This completes the apparatus necessary for a solid handbook on Japanese verbs, a book students can rely on for many years to come.

Each form is followed by a short exercise, reinforcing the points just made. Part 2 takes up the forms described in the first part and shows how they function in full-fledged sentences. Each discussion is followed by examples and exercises, ensuring that the student has understood the forms under discussion. This completes the apparatus necessary for a solid handbook on Japanese verbs, a book students can rely on for many years to come.

TAEKO KAMIYA received a BA for Doshisha Women's College (Kyoto) and MAs from the University of San Francisco in education and from the Monterey Institute of International Studies in linguistics. Among her publications are Speak Japanese Today (1989), Japanese for Fun: Make Your Stay in Japan More Enjoyable (1990), Tuttle New Dictionary on Loanwords in Japanese (1994), Subject-Grouped 1016 Kanji in Context (1997), and Japanese Particle Workbook (1998). Country of Publication.

Kodansha's Essential Kanji Dictionary. Kodansha's Essential Kanji Dictionary.

Paperback, Kodansha Amer Inc .

Paperback, Kodansha Amer Inc, 2012, ISBN13 9781568364841, ISBN10 1568364849. It is no wonder that they should feel the need for a solid reference book, one they can continually turn to throughout their studying careers. The Handbook of Japanese Verbs is just that book. Kodansha USA. Book Format.

From the very earliest stages of study until far into the intermediate level, students of the Japanese language are continually scratching their heads over the usage of verbs. It is no wonder that they should feel the need for a solid reference book, one they can continually turn to throughout their studying careers. The Handbook of Japanese Verbs is just that book.The Introduction takes the first step toward comprehension by pointing out the features of Japanese verbs that stand in contrast to their English counterparts, such as tense, politeness level, auxiliaries, and transitive and intransitive forms.Part 1 shows through tables and concise commentary how Japanese verbs are categorized, conjugated, and combined with auxiliaries. Each form is followed by a short exercise, reinforcing the points just made.Part 2 takes up the forms described in the first part and shows how they function in full-fledged sentences. Each discussion is followed by examples and exercises, ensuring that the student has understood the forms under discussion.In the appendices, the student is offered a number of look-up methods, including an English-Japanese verb dictionary. This completes the apparatus necessary for a solid handbook on Japanese verbs, a book students can rely on for many years to come
Bele
So I purchased this back in 2003 and here I am, over 10 years later, writing a review on it. This was one of the most instrumental books I used to learn Japanese. This review may be a little long, but I'll share how I studied Japanese while living abroad in hopes that some will find it helpful. While stationed in Okinawa, I tried to learn by taking a college Japanese course. In my honest opinion, I learned more from this book than from the college course. Don't get me wrong, the college course was good as it relates to learning how to read/write romaji, hiragana and katakana. It also helped in pronunciation. However, the course taught how to speak using the "polite" verb conjugation, which isn't too helpful if you want to shoot the breeze with the locals. I primarily used what I learned from this book to speak with the local community. What I liked about this book is that it starts off by teaching you the "plain" form of the verb, which all other Japanese conjugations are based off of. From there, it teaches all the other conjugations of the verbs. After I completed my college course, I studied on my own by diving into this book and making hundreds of flash cards containing all the verbs from this book. My flash cards didn't simply have the verbs on them, it had example sentences in them. This way I was memorizing sentences rather than just a single word. I forced myself to review these flashcards EVERY single day. Armed with this book (among others) and the knowledge from hundreds of flash cards, I gathered enough courage to go into a small "mom and pop" restaurant and try to order something on my own. From there, I learned more practical Japanese from the patrons of that particular establishment. Eventually, I was able to meet my future wife and made many local friends (including the owners of various restaurants). Fast forward to now, I'm now married to an Okinawan and converse daily with her in Japanese. I credit this book and the other Kodansha Dictionary books I had (Handbook of Japanese Adjectives and Adverbs, Basic Japanese Sentence Patterns, All About Particles) in me being able to meet & mingle with the local Japanese community. Negative reviews on this mention that this book isn't for beginners. I disagree, if you go through this book from beginning to end, even a beginner could effectively learn from this book. Word of caution however, this book will only be useful if you're serious and eager about learning Japanese. If not, then you'll be overwhelmed. Some further advice, after you've gotten a good handle on this book and learned to read hiragana & katakana, get yourself a book that's meant to teach English to Japanese tourists. I bought these tourist books from a nearby 100 yen store and learned a lot from them. Also, watching an American movie in English first, then watching it in Japanese was surprisingly helpful. In conclusion, I strongly recommend getting this book if you're serious about learning Japanese. With the help of this book, I've had one of the greatest times in my life learning the language and experiencing the Japanese culture.
Mavegar
I got this book about 3 days ago and I already finished it. I took Japanese in college (it was my major in undergrad). Looking back, this book would have come in handy. I’ve used multiple Japanese language programs and textbooks such as Genki, Tobira, Situational Functional Japanese (while studying abroad) as well as commercial programs such as Berlitz and many others. I’ve been studying Japanese informally since graduating so it could be that I’ve had time for some of those grammar concepts I learned to marinate, but I’m pretty confident that this verb book is just really good. (It is for those of us who are ‘verb-challenged,’ the book’s words, not mine.) This is one of those books that you can repeatedly refer back to and use as you learn more Japanese (if you’re a beginner or if you just want to review). While a lot of the forms and terms may seem confusing to a beginner, beginners should keep in mind that a book like this can be used over a long period of time. The verbs covered in this book are basically what you’ll find in Genki 1 & 2. For some reason, I found the explanations and example sentences in this book much more thorough than previous textbooks. But that could be that all the material was review for me. Either way, I wish I would have purchased this a long time ago.

One thing I noticed missing from this book was the じゃない (ja nai) conjugations that Genki uses (this book only provided ではdewa)).

This book uses a mix of romaji (in really huge letters) and Japanese (kanji and kana-hiragana and katakana) all together. I’m not anti-romaji (anymore) so that didn’t bother me, but I do prefer the Japanese characters. I think the inclusion of both is a good approach.

The title of this book is a little misleading. This isn’t simply a dictionary (if it was, I probably wouldn’t have read it all); it’s more of a reference book with exercises for you to practice. It gives you a little bit of time to practice each concept after seeing it in a few sentences, so it’s not an extensive workbook. It is very concise and well organized, which I appreciated.

One thing I really (really) liked were the English translations next to the Japanese inside the conjugation charts. The charts demonstrate the あいうえお aiueo conjugations, which include most of the basic conjugations (minus the the more complex tenses such as causative and causative-passive). Passive and potential are basically grouped together. But causative and passive have their own conjugation charts. Honorific/Humble/Respectful language is mentioned here and there, but I don’t believe there is a set section for it. (I think Genki does a better job just because it has charts for respectful language.)

The introduction and first part of the book tell you what you will learn in the book (conjugation-wise) and the second part of the book is for different grammar points associated with each conjugation. I really like how this is organized as you can focus on learning one conjugation and what it can be used for instead of jumping around from tense or conjugation to conjugation learning one use here and there only to have to go back and learn a new use for an old conjugation form from a few chapters ago (Genki cough cough). Not that there isn’t merit to the other way, but this way is better for focusing on grammar.

Each usage has about 3 examples each and after being introduced to a few different grammar points associated with the conjugation, there’s a short fill-in-the-blank activity where you’ll have to write in the correct conjugation/usage based on the English translation and Japanese sentence (available in romaji and Japanese characters). This is basically the formula for the rest of the book.

In the back are the answers to all the exercises and a few indexes. One index is by Japanese sentence patterns (with English translations! for quick searches), one is for basic Japanese verbs (regular I verbs aka う -u verbs, then regular II verbs aka る -ru verbs, then irregular verbs aka する -suru and くる -kuru) and an English index for Japanese verbs found throughout this book (verbs by their English translations). As most if not all kodansha books, there’s also a list of other books you may want to purchase at the end of the book. Overall, I would highly recommend this book as a supplement to whatever program, course or series you are using to learn Japanese.
Neol
Too much romaji for my liking. I'm not sure how much I'll use this book, since I'm trying to only read things in Japanese. This is probably better for someone just beginning.
Nekora
I had a couple of years classroom study in Japanese, many years ago, and have been learning on my own for the last year. This book, and Kamiya's other manual on pattern sentences, have been useful especially as integrative works that bring together lots of scattered information approached differently in textbooks. I think it would be less successful as a first-learning tool, but I'm not in a position to judge. The verb handbook is a very nice reference and summary of verb groups and conjugations, and clarifies the systems by which the various forms are derived. Short exercises with answers let you know whether you've really "got it".
Mohn
I've been studying Japanese for 4 years now and this is probably the most helpful book on Japanese grammar I've ever bought! While there are practice sections for each grammar pattern, I would not recommend this book for someone who is just beginning Japanese. However, as a supplement for students who have already been studying the language and want to take their writing and reading to the next level, this product is a must have.

The sentence pattern index in the back is just amazingly helpful. You can look things up by either the Japanese conjugation or the English equivalent - both things that are necessary for a book to really be helpful for reading and writing, as I can easily look something up. It is also really nice to be able to just look up a conjugation, especially "Te-form" and be able to see ALL of the grammar patterns that go with it.
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