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Judgment without Trial: Japanese American Imprisonment during World War II ePub download

by Tetsuden Kashima

  • Author: Tetsuden Kashima
  • ISBN: 0295984511
  • ISBN13: 978-0295984513
  • ePub: 1364 kb | FB2: 1277 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: University of Washington Press (October 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 336
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 461
  • Format: azw lrf docx lrf
Judgment without Trial: Japanese American Imprisonment during World War II ePub download

1 online resource (xi, 316 pages) : Annotation. Includes bibliographical references (pages 291-303) and index. Print version record.

1 online resource (xi, 316 pages) : Annotation. Preface and Acknowledgments; 1. The Imprisonment Process; 2. Pre-World War II Preparations; 3. The Internment Process of the Justice and War Departments; 4. The Territory of Hawaii; 5. The Territory of Alaska and Latin America; 6. Justice Department and Army Camps; 7. The Arbitrary Process of Control; 8. Segregation Centers and Other Camps; 9. Abuses, Protests, and the Geneva Convention; 10. Imprisonment and Stigma; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

It discusses the internment of Japanese Americans in World War II. The author and his family had been interned in World War II. Kashima, born in 1940, later served in the . Army, and took a professorial post in the University of Washington, focusing on ethnicity in the United States.

The story of the wholesale judgement and imprisonment of thousands of American citizens during World War II whose only crime was their ethnic background. Not only were the actions illegal and unconstitutional, but violated the Geneva Convention and common sense. A must read for those who think it could never happen to them.

Tetsuden Kashima uses newly obtained records to trace this process back to the 1920s, when a nascent imprisonment organizatio 2004 Washington State Book Award Finalist. government began making plans for the eventual internment and later incarceration of the Japanese American population.

Schott and Laurie Oki Series in Asian American Studies. University of Washington Press. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 6 x . 4 x . 2 Inches.

The Scott and Laurie Oki Series in Asian American Studies. Seattle: University of Washington Press. Published: 1 December 2005. by University of Chicago Press. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

Not knowing who to trust Japanese Americans were forcibly interned in camps during World War II; Otto Hagel & Hansel Mieth, Akiya Family (from San Francisco), Heart Mountain Camp, Wyoming, 1942 were found to have been working against Ametica. Photographic Print: Crowded Living Quarters of Japanese American Family Interned in a Relocation Camp by Hansel Mieth

Published by: University of Washington Press. 2. Pre–World War II Preparations.

Published by: University of Washington Press. 3. The Internment Process of the Justice and War Departments.

During World War II, our forebears elected not to focus on a negative, hate-filled response to incarceration. Instead, while still incarcerated, they joined together filled with hope for a positive future and created a new organization, the Buddhist Churches of America. In the early postwar years of the 1950s, seeking safety and a Shin Buddhist home for their children and grandchildren, our forebears mortgaged their homes, donated their property and gave of their savings to re-establish Jodo Shinshu churches as centers of safety, comfort and religious hope.

2004 Washington State Book Award FinalistJudgment without Trial reveals that long before the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government began making plans for the eventual internment and later incarceration of the Japanese American population. Tetsuden Kashima uses newly obtained records to trace this process back to the 1920s, when a nascent imprisonment organization was developed to prepare for a possible war with Japan, and follows it in detail through the war years.Along with coverage of the well-known incarceration camps, the author discusses the less familiar and very different experiences of people of Japanese descent in the Justice and War Departments’ internment camps that held internees from the continental U.S. and from Alaska, Hawaii, and Latin America. Utilizing extracts from diaries, contemporary sources, official communications, and interviews, Kashima brings an array of personalities to life on the pages of his book ― those whose unbiased assessments of America’s Japanese ancestry population were discounted or ignored, those whose works and actions were based on misinformed fears and racial animosities, those who tried to remedy the inequities of the system, and, by no means least, the prisoners themselves.Kashima’s interest in this episode began with his own unanswered questions about his father’s wartime experiences. From this very personal motivation, he has produced a panoramic and detailed picture ― without rhetoric and emotionalism and supported at every step by documented fact ― of a government that failed to protect a group of people for whom it had forcibly assumed total responsibility.
Nuadazius
As described - delivery within specified window.
Monam
Written history about the terrible plight the Japanese Americans had to endure. The personal histories give it life.
Dusho
This book is a comprehensive look at some of the major reasons for the internment of Japanese and Japanese Americans during WW2. Many people think that racial hatred of Japanese started with the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, but actually this was only the culmination of years of anti Japanese feelings , especially on the west coast. Most of the first generation Japanese were farmers, and they made what was once thought to be barren wasteland into some of the most productive land in the US. However, the 1920 Land Act prohibited all Japanese nationals from owning any land, and first generation Japanese were PROHIBITED from becoming US citizens, laws influenced by racist white farmers to prevent any more Japanese from owning farm land. The ever resourceful Issei (first generation Japanese) bypassed this by putting their land in their childrens (by law, American citizens) names. In 1924, the Congress and President Coolidge passed the Anti-Asian exclusion act, which prohibited any more immigration by Japanese (and other Asians) (for an excellent reference, see Roger Daniels "The Politics of Prejudice" for an authoritative look at the laws used to discriminate against Japanese during the early 20th century). In addition, Newspaper publishers like William Randolph Hearst were making large efforts to inflame anti Japanese sentiment in their newspapers.

When Pearl Harbor occured, mass hysteria ensued. Many Japanese owned businesses were burned and looted and homes of Japanese families were vandalized and attacked. It was Feb. 1942 when Executive Order 9066 effectively gave all persons of Japanese ancestry, some times as little as 72 hours, time to pack their belongings, settle their affairs, and report for "relocation" (a euphemism if there ever was one).

One last fact that a previous reviewer conveniently doesn't mention- The US Army's 442nd and 100th all Nisei(second generation) combat units, comprising nearly 10,000 men, were the most decorated units for their size in the history of the United States.While their families were locked up or prevented from returning to their lawful homes, "these brave men fought prejudice and won" - spoken by Pres. Harry Truman in 1945 in a ceremony honoring the 442nd and 100th battalions.Its on archival news reels, for any doubters out there.

A previous reviewer says that the WW2 internment of Japanese Americans was NOT due to racial hatred and prejudice- this book and a look at history and the congressional record for the aforementioned anti-Japanese legislation would prove him dead WRONG.
Iesha
The story of the wholesale judgement and imprisonment of thousands of American citizens during World War II whose only crime was their ethnic background. Not only were the actions illegal and unconstitutional, but violated the Geneva Convention and common sense. A must read for those who think it could never happen to them.
Wyameluna
The book Judgment Without Trial primarily focuses on the process by which U.S. authorities impounded people of Japanese descent (both alien and first generation American) from the West Coast, Hawaii and Latin America. Additionally, the author asserts that racial prejudice and political expedience were the primary motivations behind the government's plans to indefinitely hold these foreign nationals and their children under duress without charge, evidence, or due process. This secondary assertion aside, the book primarily focuses on how this process was conceived, organized, and implemented by the Justice Department, the War Relocation Authority, and the army.

Tetsuden Kashima argues that our present-day characterization of this mass imprisonment as a wartime "mistake" ignores the fact that the imprisonment of Japanese, both foreign nationals and American citizens, was conceived by high-level officials decades before the United States entered the war. The federal government's decision and plans were therefore not made in haste, or because of "hysteria" following the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Kashima further asserts that the federal Japanese imprisonment organization went far beyond the establishment of a few assembly and relocation centers. Government public relations pronouncements to the contrary, he claims the organization created by the Roosevelt administration was large, complex, and oppressive.

The book is organized around a series of themes. One concerns the problem of organizational disputes among the agencies. Another addresses the problem of control of the prisoner population. A third theme examines the way in which the imprisonment organization dealt with the unanticipated needs that arose in regard to the prisoners. Yet another theme concerns the actual control methods used in the centers.

The first three chapters chronologically present the evolution and deployment of the internment process. Chapters four and five deal with the U.S. government's treatment the Japanese living in Hawaii and Latin American. The last five chapters concern life in the camps themselves, and the physical and psychological hardships inflicted upon the internees. The book concludes with sixty eight pages of notes and charts, along with a bibliography section containing over two hundred entries.

The book appears to be thoroughly researched. Kashima's sources include personal correspondence, diaries, interviews, books, magazine articles, official government reports, along with court briefs, transcripts, and records.

Judgment Without Trial succeeds in making its case that the U.S. government began planning for the internment of the Japanese American population long before the first bomb fell onto Pearl Harbor. Also, Kashima's description of the creation and implementation of the program is illuminating. However, the book falls short in presenting objective proof of deliberate U.S. government's abused of Japanese foreign nationals and their American-born children. His evidence for the assertion that animosity toward Japanese-Americans affected the general tenor of the treatment they received is mostly anecdotal, and ignores the very real threat to our West Coast by Japan. Our commercial shipping was under constant threat by Japanese submarines following the destruction of our Pacific fleet - those same submarines actually fired missiles at our undefended coast. Also, evidence obtained from decoded Japanese diplomatic communications (the so-called "MAGIC" files) revealing the threat of a Japanese espionage networks on the West Coast is never mentioned By Kashima.
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