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Max Ernst: Beyond Surrealism: An Exhibition of the Artist's Books and Prints ePub download

by Max Ernst,Robert Rainwater,Anne Hyde Greet,Evan M. Maurer

  • Author: Max Ernst,Robert Rainwater,Anne Hyde Greet,Evan M. Maurer
  • ISBN: 0195049918
  • ISBN13: 978-0195049916
  • ePub: 1174 kb | FB2: 1183 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; First Edition edition (November 13, 1986)
  • Pages: 208
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 768
  • Format: doc txt docx mobi
Max Ernst: Beyond Surrealism: An Exhibition of the Artist's Books and Prints ePub download

Start by marking Max Ernst: Beyond Surrealism: An Exhibition of the Artist's Books and Prints as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In a third essay, Anne Hyde Greet traces the evolution of the livre de peintre, or artist's book, in 20th-century France.

Max Ernst, the great Surrealist artist, produced a body of graphic work that surpassed that of any other artist associated with Surrealism.

Max Ernst, the great Surrealist artist, produced a body of graphic work that surpassed that of any other artist . His innovative printing techniques were the equivalent of the semi-automatic image-making procedures used by the painters and poets of his day, and his collaboration with the literary founders of Dada and Surrealism resulted in some of the most beautiful and evocative books of our time. Max Ernst : Beyond Surrealism - An Exhibition of the Artist's Books and Prints.

Find nearly any book by Anne Hyde Greet. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Coauthors & Alternates. Learn More at LibraryThing. Anne Hyde Greet at LibraryThing.

Max Ernst: beyond surrealism : a Retrospective of the Artist's Books . Catalogue to an exhibition of the artist’s work in the Library’s collections.

Max Ernst: beyond surrealism : a Retrospective of the Artist's Books and Prints; with essays by Anne Hyde Greet, Evan M. Maurer, and Robert Rainwater. New York: New York Public Library and Oxford University Press, 1986.

See his Beyond Painting (1948); studies by J. Russell (1967) and U. M. Schneede (1973); R. Rainwater, Max Ernst, Beyond Surrealism: An Exhibition of the Artist's Books and Prints (1986); W. A. Camfield, e. Max Ernst: Dada and the Dawn of Surrealism (1993); W. Spies. Spies, e. Max Ernst: A Retrospective (2005). Max Ernst: Selected full-text books and articles. Max Ernst By William S. Lieberman Museum of Modern Art, 1961.

September 23, 2017–January 1, 2018. MoMA, Floor 2. This exhibition surveys the career of the preeminent Dada and Surrealist artist Max Ernst (French and American, born Germany, 1891–1976), with particular emphasis on his ceaseless experimentation. Ernst began his pursuit of radical new techniques that went "beyond painting" to articulate the irrational and unexplainable in the wake of World War I, continuing through the advent and aftermath of World War II.

Max Ernst (2 April 1891 – 1 April 1976) was a German (naturalised American in 1948 and French in 1958) painter, sculptor, graphic artist, and poet. A prolific artist, Ernst was a primary pioneer of the Dada movement and surrealism

Max Ernst (2 April 1891 – 1 April 1976) was a German (naturalised American in 1948 and French in 1958) painter, sculptor, graphic artist, and poet. A prolific artist, Ernst was a primary pioneer of the Dada movement and surrealism.

An examination of the surrealistic innovations which characterize the artist's paintings, sculpture, and graphic works
Celore
This is a must for any Ernst-ophiles. It's pricey, however this is a different kind of biography. His story is somewhat narrated through his letters and many small but sharp reproductions of his art. This is not for people just discovering him though, since there are many books that delve deeper into his history, his discoveries and the juicy gossip of his life (Max was quite the cad..). For people steeped in Ernst, it's a revelation - letters concerning the major points in his life, photos I've never seen before (I have lots of Erst books) that help tie up loose ends in his narrative - at least for me.

If you're new to Ernst, here are a couple of cheaper books that may serve you better:
1) Max Ernst - DaDa and the Dawn of Surrealism by William Camfield
2) Max Ernst - A Retrospective by Werner Spies and the Tate Gallery

Enjoy the journey! Max is a fascinating character as well as the greatest artist of his time.
Zetadda
Max Ernst Life and Times is a different kind of biography. After reading Calvin Tomkins'

Duchamp and Off the Wall - a portrait of Robert Rauschenberg, I had come to believe the biography of artist were the same. Neil Baldwin's, Man Ray - American Artist further reinforced this notion. However, Werner Spies book is a path not often taken. I suspect that the background of the authors, journalistic versus artistic has much to do with this difference.

Firstly, the book is beautiful in its glossy white high weight paper. The color plates are stunning (something lacking in Tomkins' books - again background differences). What I found disconcerting was who the text presented M.E. in an `at arms length' perspective.

The text is mainly letters and notes, some M.E. autobiographical entries strangely done in the 3rd person. Tomkins amerces you in the artist life and you feel an identity with situations and people. Spies' transcribs letter after letter (for some reason all shown in the book) to and from M.E. End result is a fragmented picture (surreal?) and not wholly fulfilling.

Now if Spies' format and Tomkins journalism got together....

Would I purchase this book again? Yes, but for the format and brilliant graphics. I will have to look elsewhere to read about Max Ernst.
Roram
This book offers a very perceptive history of this artist, and of the surrealist movement to which he belonged. The text shows a clear understanding of the many factors surrounding this movement.
Uriel
In his text, Ulrich Bischoff proposes that Max Ernst had earned the right to be known as the leading exponant of Surrealist art of the 1940's and 50's, but since Salvador Dali knew how to present himself in society to greater effect, he inherited the title. Whatever one thnks of Dali's skill as a publicist, his work is different to Ernst's in one sense - Ernst's most potent paintings were done before he came to the U.S. It's interesting to theorise that it was because Ernst was harassed by the Nazis when they invaded France where the German Ernst lived, that he created the decalcomonia technique which decorates what I think are his greatest works - Joy of Life, The Robing of the Bride, Marlene, Europe after the Rain, Day and Night, The Eye of Silence and The Temptation of St. Anthony. This technique of applying the paint to the canvas by pressing it against a flat surface, gives the result a mossy, furry or marshy appearance. This coupled with Ernst's penchance for grotesque mythological figures would have aligned him with Jewish and other non-naturalistic artists considered decadent and perverse by the Third Reich's aesthetic. What makes Bischoff's collection of Ernst's paintings interesting is the evolution of Ernst's style, which would lead him to the decalcomania. As early as 1919 in Family Excursion one sees Ernst's sombre air. I also like The Master's Bedroom, It is worth spending a night in of 1920, done in his Dada period, with the symbolism of the animals, as evidence of Ernst's interest in Freud; the grattage works Vision Induced by the Nocturnal Aspect of the Porte St Denis 1927 and The Horde 1927; and the alien-like Human Form 1931. Even his most celebrated (and personally I think overrated) work, the biblical The Entire City 1935/36 is a prelude to the later beauty, wit and eroticism. Ernst's post- decalcomanic work seems to present him as more restful, perhaps not the best state for an artist. The images are pretty but the soul is at peace. Of note is the 1942 Surrealism and Painting, where he used what Jackson Pollock would later call "dripping".
Jay
Much has been written about Ernst's alter-ego Loplop, however I don't remember a book specifically focused on the Loplop works of art. Some rarely seen drawings and paintings are shown, along with an in-depth appraisal of Loplop's place and importance in Ernst's work and mind-set.

That said, Spies is not the most compelling writer and you'll find yourself re-reading whole paragraphs because nothing really sticks. A good effort and now hard to find, so snap up a copy if you can find it. It's by no means perfect, however it IS a crucial link in Ernst's work.
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