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Roman Law in Context (Key Themes in Ancient History) ePub download

by David Johnston

  • Author: David Johnston
  • ISBN: 0521630460
  • ISBN13: 978-0521630467
  • ePub: 1371 kb | FB2: 1330 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (September 28, 1999)
  • Pages: 164
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 774
  • Format: azw doc rtf mbr
Roman Law in Context (Key Themes in Ancient History) ePub download

Key Themes in Ancient History. Key Themes in Ancient Philosophy. Roman Literature and its Contexts. Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series.

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Series: Key Themes in Ancient History. Johnston's organization, by not doing this, presented the reader with an entire book of disparate and seemingly disjunctive technical material without a mechanism for synthesizing it until the reader reached Johnston's last chapter on litigation.

Roman Law in Context explains how Roman law worked for those who lived by it, by viewing it in the light of the society and economy in which it operated. The book discusses three main areas of Roman law and life: the family and inheritance; property and the use of land; commercial transactions and the management of businesses. It also deals with the question of litigation Roman Law in Context explains how Roman law worked for those who lived by it, by viewing it in the light of the society and economy in which it operated.

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Roman Law in Context. KESSLER, DAVID and TEMIN, PETER 2007. The organization of the grain trade in the early Roman Empire. Series: Key Themes in Ancient History. Recommend to librarian. Roman Law in Context. Online ISBN: 9780511612138.

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Roman Law in Context explains how Roman law worked for those who lived by it, by viewing it in theĀ . Key Themes in Ancient History aims to provide readable, informed and original studies of various basic topics, designed in the first instance for students and teachers of Classics and Ancient History, but also for those engaged in related disciplines.

Roman law in context Johnston, David Cambridge AcademĀ .

Roman law in context Johnston, David Cambridge Academ 9780521639613 : An explanation of Roman law in the light of the society and economy in which it operated. The Roman Empire in Context: Historical and Comparative Perspectives addresses this neglected area of study.

This book attempts to look at Roman law in its social and economic context. To do so is to court criticism from both historians and lawyers. The attempt, though arduous, is not quite doomed to failure: just over thirty years ago John Crook's deservedly successful Law and Life of Rome (1967) appealed to both camps. First, if Law and Life of Rome aimed to illustrate the social and economic life of Rome through its law, the concern of the present book is more to understand the law in the light of the society and its economy.

This book explains the rules of Roman law in the light of the society and economy in which it operated. The main topics discussed are the family and inheritance, property and the use of land, commercial transactions and the management of businesses, litigation and how easily the Roman citizen could assert his or her legal rights in practice. The book involves a minimum of legal technicality and is intended to be accessible to students and teachers of Roman history.
Nirad
Johnston's book is basically organized into three sections, thought there is no mention of this structure in the table of contents. The first section introduces the reader to the sources of Roman law (how the law was made, and who made it). The second section discusses the substantive law of family, property, and contracts. The third section discusses litigation (or how the laws discussed in section two worked in practice). At the end of the book, there is a very good glossary of Roman legal terms, followed by an extremely helpful discussion of the Roman legal literature for the serious student of Roman Law to pursue.
Johnston's book does a great job of packing a lot of information into very few pages, but often at the expense of several rereads by the reader. The information is accurate and well-researched, thought it could have been presented better (see next paragraph). However, whether you're new to Roman law, or have studied the subject in depth, you will come away with a better grasp of Rome's legal system, her institutions, and her laws.
Now, for the criticism. I believe that Johnston's book would have been much better if he would have followed his discussion of the sources of Roman law (section I) with the section on litigation (section III, which discusses how the law operated in practice), followed then by a discussion of the substantive law. Johnston's organization, by not doing this, presented the reader with an entire book of disparate and seemingly disjunctive technical material without a mechanism for synthesizing it until the reader reached Johnston's last chapter on litigation. This was the chapter that tied everything together, and it should have been discussed earlier. Only upon reading this last chapter did I finally understood why everything Johnston had told me before was important, and because of this, it looks like I'll be reading this book again to fully appreciate the impact of the previous chapters.
Therefore, I would recommend reading chapter one, then the last chapter, and then the material on the substantive law following the first chapter. Doing so, I guarantee, will save you a lot of head scratching and will enable you to appreciate this book, which is otherwise very good.
Personally, while this book is accessible to the beginner, I would recommend that a reader unfamiliar with Roman law begin with Nicholas' "An Introduction to Roman Law" or Crook's "Law and Life of Rome," both of which are excellent and will better prepare you for Johnston's book.
Gozragore
The good news about "Roman Law in Context" is that it's short, clear, and gives a good overview of Roman law in core areas like family law, sales, property, and litigation. The bad news is that the book stays narrowly focused on technical legal doctrines, only sketching the law's social and political context. Bottomline: this is a great book for someone, perhaps a law student or non-legal historian of Rome, who wants a quick guide to Roman legal rules. But it's not such a great book for laymen who are interested in learning more about life in ancient Rome.
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