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The New Military Humanism: Lessons from Kosovo ePub download

by Noam Chomsky

  • Author: Noam Chomsky
  • ISBN: 1567511775
  • ISBN13: 978-1567511772
  • ePub: 1440 kb | FB2: 1246 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Common Courage Pr (September 1, 1999)
  • Pages: 199
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 435
  • Format: txt doc docx rtf
The New Military Humanism: Lessons from Kosovo ePub download

This New Humanism, timed fortuitously with a new millennium, will displace the crass and narrow interest politics of a mean-spirited past. If the picture is true, if it has even a particle of truth, then remarkable prospects lie before us.

This New Humanism, timed fortuitously with a new millennium, will displace the crass and narrow interest politics of a mean-spirited past. Material and intellectual resources surely are at hand to overcome terrible tragedies at little cost, with only a modicum of goodwill.

Unusually for Chomsky "Lessons from Kosovo" is tightly focussed on one particular conflict: the much lauded NATO intervention in Kosovo in spring 1999 that was carried out under the banner of being an almost historically unique "Humanitarian Intervention". In this short book Chomsky destroys the NATO case on every major point, and tears apart the rhetoric and rationale of Clinton, Blair, et al and their many media cheerleaders into shreds

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The New Military Humanism. Unusually for Chomsky "Lessons from Kosovo" is tightly focussed on one particular conflict: the much lauded NATO intervention in Kosovo in spring 1999 that was carried out under the banner of being an almost historically unique "Humanitarian Intervention". In this short book Chomsky destroys the NATO case on every major point, and tears apart the rhetoric and rationale of Clinton, Blair, et al and their many media cheerleaders into shreds.

The new military humanism: lessons from Kosovo. Noam Avram Chomsky was born December 7, 1928, in Philadelphia. The essays in The Politics of Human Rights are reprinted from the third issue of the irregular serial Belgrade Circle Journal (ISSN 0354-635X). During the 1940s, he began developing socialist political leanings through his encounters with the New York Jewish intellectual community.

Biographies and general introductions. 1999) The New Military Humanism: Lessons from Kosovo. Common Courage Press. Noam Chomsky on The Generative Enterprise, A discussion with Riny Huybregts and Henk van Riemsdijk. Modular Approaches to the Study of the Mind.

The following list contains the references cited in The New Military Humanism: Lessons From Kosovo.

Humanism"-Chomsky manages to purge from his purview the ACTUAL humanism which comes from mass struggles for freedom. This is most of all seen from his callous treatment of the Kosovars. He first of all denies that genocide was ever at issue, since "only" 2,500 Kosovars were supposedly killed by Serb troops prior to the start of NATO's air war.

The New Military Humanism book. Rather than being an intervent MILITARY HUMANISM SHREDDED.

Analyzing the NATO bombing, Chomsky challenges the New Humanism: Is it guided by power interests, or by humanitarian concern? Is the resort to force undertaken in the name of principles and values? Or are we witnessing.

Analyzing the NATO bombing, Chomsky challenges the New Humanism: Is it guided by power interests, or by humanitarian concern? Is the resort to force undertaken in the name of principles and values? Or are we witnessing something more crass and familiar? . org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

Book by Chomsky, Noam, Et
Kulalas
Great Price! Excellent Shipping Tim! Thank You!
Halloween
Unusually for Chomsky "Lessons from Kosovo" is tightly focussed on one particular conflict: the much lauded NATO intervention in Kosovo in spring 1999 that was carried out under the banner of being an almost historically unique "Humanitarian Intervention". In this short book Chomsky destroys the NATO case on every major point, and tears apart the rhetoric and rationale of Clinton, Blair, et al and their many media cheerleaders into shreds.

Rather than being an intervention to prevent ethnic cleansing it inaugurated it, as a simple look at the chronology would reveal as well as paying attention to what military figures such as US-NATO commanding General Wesley Clark said, and the pre-war diplomacy which culminated in the Rambouillet Agreement was almost certainly set up to be refused by the Serbs, indeed it was more than NATO achieved after three months of bombing as well as flouting the agreements that brought the bombing to an end.

Chomsky takes the reader on a brief tour through the rhetoric used during conflicts through the ages and finds that practically every resort to arms is carried out under the banner of lofty words about "principles and values" and proclamations regarding it's "humanitarian" nature. With regard to other conflicts occurring during the 1990's that were minimally as serious as that in Kosovo, Chomsky makes the point that a NATO member, Turkey, was carrying out far worse massacres, with generous access to US weaponry, with hardly peep from NATO, Clinton, Blair and their media fanclub. Likewise Colombia, not to mention the murderous sanctions being inflicted on Iraq primarily by the US & the UK that resulted in hundreds of thousands of deaths.

In short this is a book that is still well worth reading, a tightly focussed and devastating critique of the NATO intervention and its immediate aftermath. The reader who is interested in the conflicts that tore Yugoslavia apart during the 1990's would be well advised to look at Susan Woodward's Balkan Tragedy: Chaos and Dissolution After the Cold War which is exhaustive on the causes of the conflict as well as its early years. With regard to some of the aforementioned media cheerleaders Verso's fine Counterblast series includes looks at Michael Ignatieff,Thomas Friedman and Bernard Henri Levy.
Pooker
Chomsky's latest is a meticulous dissection of the role played by the Western, primarily American, media during the 1999 Kosovo crisis. Although a bit tedious at times if one has already read his classic critical works on the mass media as propaganda system (e.g. "Manufacturing Consent" and "Necessary Illusions"), "New Military Humanism" is still a crucial work to read if one wants to understand an important aspect of this war. Perhaps my only criticism of the book is that Chomsky is not sufficiently familiar with recent Balkan politics, so that his overriding message at times seems to be that Kosovo did not become a problem until the U.S. government, followed by the American media, came in and made it a problem. Kosovo and its Albanian population were in fact one of the major contributing factors to the breakdown of Yugoslav politics in the late 1980s, eventually leading to the collapse of that country with the consequences that are well known to us all. The problems in Kosovo itself festered for over ten years before taking the form of open hostilities in 1997/1998. Where Chomsky is correct is in pointing out that once the U.S. and (to a lesser extent) its NATO allies decided to take a more active role in Kosovo for whatever reason, the media promptly jumped in to generate public support for any policy moves. What the media did, following cues from the State Department, NATO headquarters and elsewhere, was to turn something that was essentially a regional dilemma (albeit an extremely troubling one) into a matter of major international concern. After all, why should Kosovo be more important to the average American citizen than East Timor-as Chomsky frequently points out? The stage was then set to make even air strikes against Serbia publicly acceptable-much as the war against Iraq was in 1991. Parenthetically, I don't say any of this, and I don't necessarily think it was Chomsky's intent, so much to condemn or defend the local actors in this conflict, i.e. the KLA and Milosevic's regime of thugs and war criminals, but to criticize the way the problem was handled by the "world's only remaining super-power" once it become involved. Just as in Bosnia, the timing of involvement and the political structure set up to maintain "the peace" are all wrong, as the continuing turmoil of Kosovo under international military occupation is now proving.
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