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The American Democrat ePub download

by James Fenimore Cooper

  • Author: James Fenimore Cooper
  • ISBN: 0913966916
  • ISBN13: 978-0913966914
  • ePub: 1187 kb | FB2: 1906 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Humanities
  • Publisher: Liberty Fund Inc. (May 1, 1981)
  • Pages: 279
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 465
  • Format: docx doc azw lit
The American Democrat ePub download

James Fenimore Cooper (September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851) was an American writer of the first half of the 19th century

James Fenimore Cooper (September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851) was an American writer of the first half of the 19th century. His historical romances depicting frontier and Native American life from the 17th to the 19th centuries created a unique form of American literature. He lived much of his boyhood and the last fifteen years of life in Cooperstown, New York, which was founded by his father William on property that he owned.

In these skepticisms, Cooper was not alone (even though this book was in large part to blame for Cooper's fall from American celebrity to American tragedy). Most of the original founders had these very concerns. One read through the Federalist papers show that the founders were concerned with such things as factionization, mob rule, and how to make demogoguery difficult.

The American Democrat book. I have always been a fan of James Fenimore Cooper. Cooper was perhaps America's first nature writer, for he embraced the outdoor adventure. Another Cooper writing I came across was The American Democrat.

James Fenimore Cooper (September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851) was a prolific and popular American writer of the early 19th century. His historical romances of frontier and Indian life in the early American days created a unique form of American literature

James Fenimore Cooper (September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851) was a prolific and popular American writer of the early 19th century. His historical romances of frontier and Indian life in the early American days created a unique form of American literature. He lived most of his life in Cooperstown.

When "The American Democrat" was first published in 1838, Cooper's position as America's first major novelist obscured his serious contribution to the discussion of American principles and politics. Yet Cooper," says H. L. Mencken, "was probably the first American to write about Americans in the really frank spirit. a simple, sound and sensible tract, moderate in tone and extraordinarily astute in its conclusions. Cooper provides a concise statement of the principles of American democracy and of its social ramifications.

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James Fenimore Cooper, first major American novelist, author of the novels of frontier .

James Fenimore Cooper, first major American novelist, author of the novels of frontier adventure known as the Leatherstocking Tales, featuring the wilderness scout called Natty Bumppo, or Hawkeye. They include The Pioneers (1823), The Last of the Mohicans (1826), The Prairie (1827), The Pathfinder. Cooper’s mother, Elizabeth Fenimore, was a member of a respectable New Jersey Quaker family, and his father, William, founded a frontier settlement at the source of the Susquehanna River (now Cooperstown, New York) and served as a Federalist congressman during the administrations of George Washington and John Adams.

James Fenimore Cooper. On Distinctive American Principles. Не удалось найти ни одного отзыва.

James Fenimore Cooper was an established early nineteenth century American writer. He prolifically penned historical fiction and was a major proponent of Romanticism. He is famous for writing a romantic masterpiece, The Last of the Mohicans. Born on September 15, 1789, Cooper grew up in Burlington, New Jersey. He was the eleventh child of William Cooper and Elizabeth Cooper. He was named after his grandfather who emigrated from England to America. Cooper’s family briefly lived in New Jersey and moved to New York. In 1802, he got enrolled at Yale universit.

Famous: Quotes By James Fenimore Cooper American Me. This book went on to become more popular than the former publication and catapulted him to international fame and recognition.

Famous: Quotes By James Fenimore Cooper American Men. Died At Age: 61. Sun Sign: Virgo. James Fenimore Cooper was the eleventh of the twelve children born to William Cooper and Elizabeth Cooper, in Burlington, New Jersey. His father was a United States Congressman. Many of his siblings died during infancy or childhood. In 1823, he wrote, ‘The Pioneers’, the first of the stories which would later go on to be published in the famous, ‘Leatherstocking Tales’. This book went on to be considered the ‘first true American novel’.

When The American Democrat was first published in 1838, Cooper's position as America's first major novelist obscured his serious contribution to the discussion of American principles and politics. Yet Cooper," says H. L. Mencken, "was probably the first American to write about Americans in the really frank spirit . . . a simple, sound and sensible tract, moderate in tone and extraordinarily astute in its conclusions." Cooper provides a concise statement of the principles of American democracy and of its social ramifications. He was concerned that these principles and our institutions would be perverted--especially by the confusion of an equality of rights with equality of condition.

Realistic
Very interesting read. James Fenimore Cooper was much more than just a romance novel writer (Last of the Mohicans).
He was very thoughtful and detailed in his observations in this book. Very much enjoyed it cover to cover.
Felolak
This captures the essence of (American) democracy. In some cases time has uplifted us of the concerns of the writer. In other cases his concerns are truer today than when he probably wrote them!
Snake Rocking
Whereas, Alexis de Tocqueville offers his perspective on America as an outside observer, the literary genius James Fenimore Cooper offers his assessment of culture, politics and society in 19th century America. He doesn't hold democracy to be sacrosanct like we do today, but rather like any other system of government with its advantages and disadvantages. His look at the nature of liberty and its relation with equality is particularly intriguing.
He is cognizant of the dangers posed to American self-government, which values legal equality. Equality, is a virtue, only insofar as it pertains to equal rights and equality before the law. Any effort at establishing equality of outcome is tantamount to tyranny and opposed to liberty. Cooper illustrates the precarious relationship between liberty and equality. Unless, tradition, custom, the rule of law and the Constitution are revered and upheld- the American Polity could easily collapse into majoritarian tyranny under a demagogue.
One gains an appreciation of the system of government established by the American founding fathers after reading this book... They established a constitutionally-limited federal republic, with limits not only on the power of government, but with limits placed on the power of majority rule, so as to limit the fundamental role of government to protecting the rights of its citizens. This constitutional republic sought to balance out monarchial, democratic, and aristocratic elements...
Urreur
Flrst things first. It should be noted off the bat that the title of this book, "The American Democrat," is something of a misnomer. Fennimore Cooper wrote "The Aemrican Democrat" is a reaction to the radically democratic ideals of the Jacksonian presidency and the "democratic revolution." While Cooper didn't exactly hate democracy, he doesn't love it either. This book is an attempt to put arguments behind that sentiment.

What does Cooper like about democracy? First off, that it is better than a monarchy or aristocracy (he has only bitter words for the latter, and measuredly skeptical views about the former). Also, Cooper is a fan of the type of legal equality - equality of rights, rather than outcomes - that is generally found only in democratic systems. Lastly, Cooper (wrongly, in my judgment) suggests that democracy raises people up a bit in manners, habits, and thought.

And this is where his like for democracy seems to end. What does he dislike about it? In one of the best chapters of the book, "On Demogogues," Cooper notes that peolpe are easily misled by false power-seekers. "The man who is constantly telling the people that they are unerring in judgment, and that they have all power, is a demogogue." And the people, he notes, eat such praise up; the demogogue thus gains the people's trust and gains what she/he is really after: power OVER the people.

In another prescient chapter, "On Public Opinion," Cooper also notes that public opinion is all too often not the result of calm, detached reasoning, but of emotion, party/faction loyalty, pressure to conform, etc. In a chapter on the press, he even talks about the (in his word) "despotism" of the press and how its not-always-honest writings hold undue sway on the American public.

In these skepticisms, Cooper was not alone (even though this book was in large part to blame for Cooper's fall from American celebrity to American tragedy). Most of the original founders had these very concerns. One read through the Federalist papers show that the founders were concerned with such things as factionization, mob rule, and how to make demogoguery difficult.

And who cannot say that the dangers that Cooper points out (making him very unpopular in his day!) have not come to pass? Every politician nowadays seems to fit Cooper's notion of a demogogue. They gain power OVER us by flattering us into believing that it is we, not they, at the helm. And public opinion being as often made by emotion and faction as by reason? Just look around you. That is to say nothing of the endless talk (on the right and left) about "media bias," which to my knowledge, "The American Democrat" was the first book to really address.

For all that, there is one area (a large one, to be sure) of "American Democrat" that was unpalatable to me; that is, Cooper's obsession with naturally occuring inequalities between people. Obviously it is true that some are better at certain things than others (that, for instance, not all will have the intelligence to go to college). But Cooper seems obsessed with phrases like, "gentlemen of superior taste." One example suffices: "A system must be radically wrong when the keeper of a tavern or of a grocery... can command more votes than a man of the highest attainments, or of the highest character." Sentences like this abound in "The American Democrat," and, though I am certainly not a radical egalitarian, my 21st centuy eyes find these views not only antiquated, but very much against the spirit of liberty that Cooper professes to be writing in.

For all that, though, this book is a good one, not only for its extollation of the founding principles of our government, but as a conversation starter - an antithesis to the view, so alive in our day, that democracy is the cure-all to our ills.
Mr.Death
First published in 1838, The American Democrat is a wide-ranging series of essays, many of them couched in theoretical terms, about the historical and cultural bases of American democracy, and an informed critique of many aspects of American politics, society, and culture in the 1830s.. Cooper wrote the book shortly after returning to Jacksonian America after a seven-year sojourn in Europe, and it reflects much of his discontent with what he found. As a cogent and informed commentary on 19th Century America it belongs with a book with which it has often been compared -- Toqueville's Democracy in America.
Mr.Savik
Cooper was an acute commentator on the strengths and weaknesses of American society as it developed during the first half of the 19th century. Like a number of other observers Cooper came to be fearful that a society built upon the ideas of self-government, along with legal equality ("democracy" in the social sense), unless it is strongly bound by law and custom and unless such fundamentals as property rights remain sacrosanct, would come to be transformed into some sort of popular tyranny. Source: Literature and Liberty, The New American March 17, 1997.
Tejora
Those hoping for an attack on mob rule and Andrew Jackson will be sorely disappointed; this 'treatise on Jacksonian democracy' is hardly a commentary on the current events of Cooper's age, and does not even mention Jackson. Rather, Cooper, spends more time discussing the merits of proper pronounciation than slavery! Further, for a polemic that greatly hurt its writer's reputation, the book is pretty weak and tame.
bought this edition because there is an introduction by H.l.Mencken!!
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