» » One Million A.D.

One Million A.D. ePub download

by Gardner Dozois

  • Author: Gardner Dozois
  • ISBN: 0739462733
  • ISBN13: 978-0739462737
  • ePub: 1151 kb | FB2: 1247 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Science Fiction Book Club; Book Club Edition edition (2005)
  • Pages: 399
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 771
  • Format: azw lit lrf lrf
One Million A.D. ePub download

FREE shipping on qualifying offers It's a span of time so staggeringly huge that it's hard for the human mind to grasp.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers It's a span of time so staggeringly huge that it's hard for the human mind to grasp. Even within science fiction.

Contents ix, Introduction: Exploring the Far Future (One Million . essay by Gardner Dozois 3, Good Mountain, novella by Robert Reed 67, A Piece of the Great World, novella by Robert Silverberg 143, Mirror Image, novella by Nancy Kress 203, Thousandth Night, novella by Alastair Reynolds 283, Missile Gap, novella by Charles Stross 349, Riding the Crocodile, novella by Greg.

He also won the Nebula Award for Best Short Story twice. He was inducted to the Science Fiction Hall of Fame on June 25, 2011.

ed. by Gardner Dozois. For Tyler and Isabella, who are the future. The concept of the far future is a relatively new one. Before you can conceive of a time millions of years from now, you first have to have a sense of a past that stretches millions of years behind us, an intuition into what has been called deep time, the kind of time, measured out in geological eras, in which mountains rise and fall, rock is laid down in patiently accumulating strata at the.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. One Million Steps: A Marine Platoon at War. West Bing.

The Mammoth Book of Best New SF 24. Gardner Dozois. Includes longer stories set in "One Million . Even with competition, it would still be the best of the Best.

Fortunately, Dozois and Dann have found them. by:Robert ReedRobert SilverbergNancy KressAlastair ReynoldsGreg EganAt the publisher's request, this title is sold without DRM (Digital Rights Management). Baen Publishing Enterprises, 30 сент.

One million years from now. It's a span of time so huge that it's hard for the mind to grasp. Even within science fiction, to conjure up a convincing portrait of what humanity might be like in such a remote future calls for writers with rare breadth of vision. Fortunately, Dozois and Dann have found them. by: Robert Reed Robert Silverberg Nancy Kress Alastair Reynolds Greg Egan. At the publisher's request, this title is sold without DRM (Digital Rights Management).

To our good fortune, he has also been writing more fiction. His last story, "When the Great Days Came," appeared in our December 2005 issue

Gardner Dozois's short introduction to One Million . raises expectations the tales themselves can't fulfill

Gardner Dozois's short introduction to One Million . raises expectations the tales themselves can't fulfill Earth itself will have been altered almost out of recognition, and all our history and culture, everything we are, everything we know and cherish, will have faded to dim and half-forgotten mythology-if it's remembered at all. (p. x). This is a recipe for exciting fiction, but it is a recipe few of the stories in the book live up to.

From the front flap: "A million years from now...It's a span of time so staggeringly huge that it's hard for the human mind to grasp. Even within science fiction, to conjure up a convincing portrait of what humanity might be like in such a remote future call for a breadth of vision and literacy skill rare among writers. The SFBC and 15-time Hugo winner Gardner Dozois are pleased to say that the writers gathered here have met the challenge. These daring visionaries provide some of the most vivid, evocative, mind-stretching entertainment you're likely to find: six original novellas that imagine life in 'One Million A.D.' - a time so far ahead that the human race and the Earth itself will have radically changed, and all that we know faded into legend.....if remembered at all. In Robert Reed's 'Good Mountain', a group of refugees riding in the belly of a worm try to outrun the poisonous eruptions that are incinerating the world. Picturing an Earth newly emerged from a centuries-long winter, Robert Silverberg follows an archaeologist and her lover to 'A Piece of the Great World' - a tragic band of survivors from a race long thought extinct. In 'Mirror Image', Nancy Kress imagines a clone family who investigates their sister's destruction of a star system - and reveals a wholly unexpected menace. Gathering for a celebration of their adventures, members of an immortal line of supermen uncover a conspiracy of galactic proportions in Alistair Reynolds' 'Thousandth Night'. In 'Middle Gap'. Charles Stross takes us to a Cold War Earth mysteriously transferred to a giant disc in the Magellanic Clouds - one of many alien continents whose shattered geographies both the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. are determined to explore - to their ultimate peril. Greg Egan's 'Riding the Crocodile' tells of a couple who - after 10,000 years of marriage in which they've exhausted every worthwhile experience - are ready to end their lives, but not before they attempt one last hurrah."
Watikalate
I read mostly science fiction short stories, and I found this collection of all new novellas to be one of the most enjoyable I've encountered. Each of the 6 stories is a glimpse into a semi-plausible far future with compelling characters and environments and engaging storylines. Apparently it's not for everyone, but if you've enjoyed work by any of the authors - Robert Reed, Robert Silverberg, Nancy Kress, Alastair Reynolds, Charles Stross, and Greg Egan - they're at the top of their game here. (Though I would note that Charles Stross's story is atypical of his style - if you like his scattershot techno-crazy stories you might not like this one; it's actually too far in the future to contain any GNU/Linux in-jokes)
Hi_Jacker
Bought this book to read a story by Alastair Reynolds. I enjoyed the story and the book was reasonably priced. The condition and delivery were as promised. I was pleased with this purchase.
Mogelv
I'm sad I left this on my shelf so long before reading it, this is one of the strongest collections I've read and really showcases the strengths of the novella, a form I particularly love but doesn't appear enough in the short fiction magazines.

The conceit of each of the stories in the collection is the far far future, a relatively recent idea as the editor points out in the foreward. What we want from this is a sense of true difference, even humans at that point should be incredibly alien.

Though all stories are good, there are some better and some worse. Robert Reed's story though truly alien with the setup of an earth undergoing total tectonic collision and giant worms providing transport was perhaps the least strong. Charles Stross' story though good was the least alien, transporting cold war era earth to the future on a huge discworld. I thought the Kress story about the clone sisters was both sufficiently alien and sufficiently strong. The Alistair Reynolds story was also top-notch in portraying betrayal amongst an immortal clone family in a post-scarcity far future, a future where they gather together every 200,000 years and it is nothing for one of them to spend thousands of years preparing the venue. The Silverberg and Egan story fall in the middle, both good stories and reasonably alien in their point of view of uplifted species and humans in another apparently post-scarcity human/computer hybrid future respectively.

This book really should be in print and offered to a mass audience.
Wohald
I picked up this collection because I wanted to read "Thousandth Night" by Alastair Reynolds before I read his novel HOUSE OF SUNS, which takes place in the same universe. I had already read "Good Mountain" and "Riding the Crocodile" which are reprinted in "The Year's Best Science Fiction: Twenty-Fourth Annual Collection".

I'll just make a few minor additions to what's already been said here:

"Good Mountain" is by a long distance the weirdest contribution to this volume. In it, we join a man on a train ride through hell, an attempt to escape a planetary disaster in progress. It reads initially like bizarre fantasy, but what *might* be a scientific explanation slowly emerges.

SF stories often involve present-day humans uncovering ancient alien ruins and artifacts. Less often, we see stories of future humans uncovering artifacts from present-day humanity. (Quoth Charlton Heston: "God damn you to Hell!") "A Piece of the Great World" is a sort of love story/travelogue that has far future uplifted simians uncovering earthly artifacts that post-date humanity.

Nancy Kress is a talented SF author, but her novella "Mirror Image," is probably the least interesting piece in this volume.

Reynolds' "Thousandth Night" features an opulent far-future setting vaguely reminiscent of John C. Wright's GOLDEN AGE (minus the strange cognitive stuff and the classical mythology). It introduces the characters Campion and Purslane who are also the protagonists of the later novel HOUSE OF SUNS. The pair realize that something fishy is going on at their family reunion, and eventually find that the suspicious activity involves not only murder but also a galaxy-spanning conspiracy. It's more a preliminary sketch for HOUSE OF SUNS than a prequel.

In Charles Stross' "Missile Gap," he displays both his familiar satirical touch and his obsession with spies, secretive bureaucracies, and bizarre, evil conspiracies that go way deeper than virtually anybody realizes. Like much of Stross' work, this is more a clever exercise than a satisfying story. And it really doesn't belong in this volume; Stross cheated.

Greg Egan's "Riding the Crocodile" begins with the line, "In their ten thousand, three hundred and ninth year of marriage, Leila and Jasim began contemplating death." They undertake a final adventure, attempting to contact "the Aloof", an alien species true to its name. I'm not a big fan of Egan's, but this one's pretty good.

I wouldn't pick this collection over one of the "best of" volumes that Dozois edits each year, but it's still a shame that it's not available in paperback.
E-Books Related to One Million A.D.: