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The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970: Volume 10 ePub download

by Charles Schulz

  • Author: Charles Schulz
  • ISBN: 0857862146
  • ISBN13: 978-0857862143
  • ePub: 1105 kb | FB2: 1460 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Canongate Books Ltd; Main edition (2011)
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 811
  • Format: txt lit doc rtf
The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970: Volume 10 ePub download

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item 2 The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970 by Charles M. Schultz, Mo Willems, NEW Book, FREE -The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970 by Charles M. Schultz, Mo Willems, NEW Book, FREE. item 3 The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970 - 9780857862143 -The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970 - 9780857862143.

Charles Monroe "Sparky" Schulz (/ʃʊlts/; November 26, 1922 – February 12, 2000) was an American cartoonist and creator of the comic strip Peanuts (which featured the characters Charlie Brown and Snoopy, among others). He is widely regarded. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential cartoonists of all time, cited by cartoonists including Jim Davis, Bill Watterson, Matt Groening, Dav Pilkey, and Stephan Pastis.

The first of the Complete Peanuts books I picked up, it contains the years I became sentient to who Charlie . As I work my way through these volumes of "The Complete Peanuts", I keep expecting to hit a point where the comic loses its spark, and falls into lazy self-repetition

The first of the Complete Peanuts books I picked up, it contains the years I became sentient to who Charlie Brown, Linus, and Snoopy were. As with all great comics, the philosophy is as deep as the humor, and it impacted me greatly. As I work my way through these volumes of "The Complete Peanuts", I keep expecting to hit a point where the comic loses its spark, and falls into lazy self-repetition. And it keeps not happening. These are still brilliant, an absolute delight to read.

Charles M. Schulz, Mo Willems. He turns up first as Snoopy's secretary, then gradually becomes a good friend whom Snoopy helps to fly South. Schulz was born November 25, 1922, in Minneapolis. Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999

Charles M. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google). Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day-and the day before his last strip was published-having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand-an unmatched achievement in comics.

In Charles Schulz's The Complete Peanuts 1969-1970,Woodstock makes his first appearance, Peppermint Patty runs afoul of herschool's dress code, Lucy declares herself a "New Feminist," and Snoopy returnsto the Daisy Hill Puppy Farm on a speaking engagement. Speaking of Snoopy, thisvolume falls under the sign of the Great Beagle, as three separate storylinesfocus on the mysterious sovereign of Beagledom.

The Complete Peanuts is a book series published by Fantagraphics. A new book in the series was released every six months and each contains two years of strips except for the first volume which includes strips from 1950 to 1952, just under three months longer. Publication of the series was completed in 2016.

Shipping shrinkwrapped, with volumes 1967-1968 and 1969-1970 packed in a sturdy custom box . A boxed set of the ninth and tenth volumes of The Complete Peanuts, designed by the award-winning graphic novelist, Seth.

Shipping shrinkwrapped, with volumes 1967-1968 and 1969-1970 packed in a sturdy custom box designed especially for this set, it's the perfect gift book item. Shipping shrinkwrapped, with volumes 1967-1968 and 1969-1970 packed in a sturdy custom box designed especially for this set, it's the perfect gift book item.

Complete Peanuts 1969-1970
Thozius
I just received this set yesterday and it is just as sturdy as the others. I can't believe my collection is almost complete. This is a great collection for all fans of the strip and I, for one, am proud to own them. Beautifully done as always.

Now for the good part. Fans of the collection have been curious as to what is going to happen with the final volume. Will it have a case or not? A few months ago I contacted the publishers about this and was told that there will indeed be a 26th volume and final box set next year. However, there has been no official word yet from the publishers so this morning I contacted again concerning the same matter and was told once again that there will be a 26th volume. This time I was given a bit more info as well. Here was there response:

(Cut and pasted)

Due to collector demands we're publishing a 26th volume of material yet to be determined and there will be a boxed set for 25 & 26 at the end of 2016.

Our pr dept. gave me this bit of information that will be apart of promotion starting next year. "Complete Peanuts fans: although the strip has been collected, we have one more volume up our sleeve for next fall, collecting a treasure trove of Schulz rarities, from his initial Peanuts pitch packet, to several comic book stories, advertising art, two major, never-before published interviews, and many other surprises!"
Yozshujind
I've written reviews for all of the previous versions of the Complete Peanuts and they are all glowing. The 7th installment continues that trend. What amazes me about this book is that there are still a lot of strips that I have never seen before (I'd say 20-25%). I figured as the series continued, I would see less and less unfamiliar comics, but there are still quite a few I don't recall ever seeing. The other reviewers do a good job hitting the highlights, so I won't repeat, but it just is fun to see a complete series instead of the partial series of a particular topic (Snoopy in the hospital comes to mind, I had seen maybe half of the strips over the years, but this collection tells the whole story).

You want this book, you need this book. The next edition (which will come out this fall and will have Charlie Brown on the cover) will begin the biggest shift in the direction of the strip when Peppermint Patty is introduced. I can't wait.
Miromice
Well, a little disappointed as I thought this was the FINAL volume in the series, but then I read the word "penultimate" on the bookjacket and after a little research discovered there will one more book in the series (Vol. 26) that collects rarities, demo strips and other non-strip related Peanuts art. That being said, it's a little bittersweet to have completed the entire strip in collection -- minus one missing strip from 1957 I believe that was not in the archive and no one has been able to find a copy (to the best of my knowledge - the publisher of this series said they would be publish it in a future volume if it was ever found). But this is still a fitting end (almost). My only quibble with this release concerns the final Sunday panel that was published 9 hours after Schulz's passing. In the original color strip, there are (I assume) digitally imposed images of past scenes in the blank space above Snoopy's (read: Schulz's) final typed words. I know this because I saved the strip from my copy of that Sunday paper. I also still get misty-eyed and the lump forms in my throat when I read that final strip and those words in bold typeface: "Dear Friends...

Truth be told, I bawled like a baby after reading it initially over 16 years ago, especially after learning Schulz had died the night before. In fact, Charles Schulz is one of the three "celebrity" deaths I have ever cried over as if I lost a member of my own family. Fred Rogers and Dick Clark are the other two. Perhaps there was some subconscious "avuncular" association I had with these 3 individuals - like they were the favorite old uncles who were nonthreatening and wise in their own ways. Mr. Rogers was, of course, a major part of my early childhood along with Sesame Street and the Electric Company (even though admittedly some of his stuff seems pretty sappy looking back with adult hindsight but I still think he genuinely cared about children and their feelings), and Dick Clark helped to inform me of rock and popular music as I came of musical age in the late 70's/early 80's via American Bandstand, and countless Rockin' New Year Eves. I am of the firm belief that one establishes his/her musical tastes during their tween years and I happened to enter that during the Punk/New Wave explosion (and I still like the music from that era - not the crap it mutated into by 1985 - by then I was well on my way to what would soon be called alternative/college radio music).

However, throughout my childhood and into my adult life, the one constant by was Charles Schulz and Peanuts, either via the daily comic strip or the TV specials (which still continue to air on Broadcast Television), the books, the greeting cards, the stuffed Snoopys, the Christmas ornaments, even the Met Life commercials. So thanks to Fantagraphics and the Schulz family for archiving and allowing this collection to be made available to the public. I look forward to purchasing the FINAL volume in October and then my collection will be more or less complete!
mIni-Like
This Peanuts collection, 1963-1964, stands out. The strip suffered from overexposure beginning about ten years later. It was probably on nearly every bulletin board in every grade school in the country. In that time, it was mainly the very sentimentalized excerpts featuring a sweet saccharine world, and it is still close to that today. Too bad, as it leaves out the sharper and wittier world of the characters. The 1964 Sunday proclaims, "Happiness is winning an argument with your sister," so when Lucy argues that Linus will get great satisfaction from kicking apart a snow-Lucy he had made, he says "On the contrary! That would be crude. I'm just going to stand here and watch it slowly melt away!" In other places, Lucy makes her patented temper humorous and even wise when she claims,"There's nothing like a little physical pain to take your mind off your emotional problems." Sunday strips then were more widely read, so when Charley Brown lamented twice in one Sunday, "There's a dreariness in the air that depresses me," many people laughed but nodded their heads. But perhaps Sally displays the most existential angst when after crying out loud on a Sunday, she explains, "I was jumping rope....Everything was all right...when...Suddenly it all felt so futile!" On a side note, I find that reading just a couple pages a day works best with strip reprints. They were intended by their creators to be read a little at a time. In any case, this volume of Fantagraphics' great series is a special, truthful one.
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