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What is theology? ePub download

by Maurice F Wiles

  • Author: Maurice F Wiles
  • ISBN: 0192135252
  • ISBN13: 978-0192135254
  • ePub: 1303 kb | FB2: 1875 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; Ex-priory Library edition (1976)
  • Pages: 117
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 627
  • Format: azw lrf rtf lit
What is theology? ePub download

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Maurice Frank Wiles (17 October 1923 – 3 June 2005) was an Anglican priest and academic. He was Regius Professor of Divinity at the University of Oxford for 21 years, from 1970 to 1991. Wiles was educated at the Tonbridge School in Kent, and worked at Bletchley Park during World War II. He then studied at Christ's College, Cambridge, and Ridley Hall. After ordination he spent two years as curate at St George's, Stockport, but then returned to Ridley Hall as chaplain.

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Author: Maurice F. Wiles ISBN 10: 0192890662. Title: What is Theology?. Opus Books) Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Books will be free of page markings. Read full description. See details and exclusions. What is Theology? by Maurice F. Wiles (Paperback, 1976). Pre-owned: lowest price.

Christian Theology and Inter-Religious Dialogue. Let those who undervalue theology read it (What is Theology?) and then ask themselves if theology is either a soft option or an irrelevant pastime. Explorations in Theology. Remaking of Christian Doctrine. R. P. C. Hanson "It is a discussion of the issues that arise when one tries to reflect on what is involved in doing theology. Such reflection is incumbent upon theologians, but will be of interest. who want to know how a theologian understands his discipline.

Maurice F. Wiles has written . Maurice F. Day has written: 'A sermon preached in St. Matthias's Church, Dublin on Sunday, January 22, 1860 with a preface concerning what is to be done under present circumstances' 'A letter on the religious movement in the north of Ireland'

The remaking of Christian doctrine' - subject(s): Addresses, essays, lectures, Doctrinal Theology, Theology, Doctrinal. Working papers in doctrine' - subject(s): Doctrinal Theology, Theology, Doctrinal. Faith, doubt and theology' - subject(s): Theology. Matthias's Church, Dublin on Sunday, January 22, 1860 with a preface concerning what is to be done under present circumstances' 'A letter on the religious movement in the north of Ireland'. What has the author F A Comer written?

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Mobile version (beta). If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: GO. Exact matches. Religion, Politics and Preferment in France since 1890: La Belle Epoque and its Legacy (The Wiles Lectures).

It assumes that there is a growing body of readers, both inside and outside the Church, who are prepared to give serious attention to the nature and claims of the Christian faith, and who expect to be given by theologians authoritative and up-to-date answers to the kind of questions thinking.

It assumes that there is a growing body of readers, both inside and outside the Church, who are prepared to give serious attention to the nature and claims of the Christian faith, and who expect to be given by theologians authoritative and up-to-date answers to the kind of questions thinking people want to ask. More and more it becomes clear that we are unlikely to get any answers that will satisfy the deepest needs of the human spirit from any other quarter. Present-day science and philosophy give us little help on the ultimate questions of human destiny

By (author) Maurice F. Wiles. Other books in this series. The Ways of Judgment.

By (author) Maurice F. How do we discern it? These questions lead Professor Wiles to discuss the nature of creation, the origin of evil, providence in public and private history and finally God's action in Christ and in us. Concerned to give a consistent overall interpretation, he provides answers which at the same time question much current Christian thinking.

Does he affect what happens to us in the varied experiences of our daily life? .

Does he affect what happens to us in the varied experiences of our daily life? If so, in what ways and by what means? . These questions lead Professor Wiles to discuss the nature of creation, the origin of evil, providence in public and private history and finally God's action in Christ and in us.

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"Let those who undervalue theology read it (What is Theology?) and then ask themselves if theology is either a soft option or an irrelevant pastime." R. P. C. Hanson

"It is a discussion of the issues that arise when one tries to reflect on what is involved in doing theology. Such reflection is incumbent upon theologians, but will be of interest ... to those ...who want to know how a theologian understands his discipline." M.Wiles, Preface

British Theology, after a trauma:

"In the middle decades of the 20th century, a drastically reductionist way of thinking became the bottom line against which everything was measured. In the present 'grandparent generation' of theologians, those who ignored the challenge were easily written off, while those who tried to meet it risked being intimidated into reductive or at least very apologetic and defensive forms of Christian theology. In the face of aggressive, confident and often brilliant critiques (key figures included Bertrand Russell, the early Wittgenstein, G. Moore and A. Ayer), it was easy to lose theological nerve, become wary of exposure, and be tempted to withdraw into safe havens of academic respectability. The grandparents had an extraordinarily difficult task, and their achievement in sustaining and developing a university environment where theology could still flourish has been remarkable. Yet the effects of the trauma persist, directly and indirectly." This is, in my own view the best concise explanation, offered by David Ford, Regius Professor of Divinity, Cambridge University, that makes the above comment of the Eminent Patrologist and theologian RPC Hanson relevant, in place and on time.

Historical to Ecumenical Theology:

A pivotal figure, according to theological experts like Ford, has been that the doyen of English patristic scholars, Henry Chadwick, and R.P.C. Hanson, have largely directed the field toward guild concerns. Maurice Wiles, and Bishop Kallistos Ware have been exceptions, for different reasons, but of the following generation Archbishop Rowan Williams, has been almost alone in doing rigorous scholarly and historical work since, integrating it with a critical and constructive theological position. Some fifty years ago, the theologian Wilfred Cantwell asserted that any qualified intellectual statement of the Christian faith must refer to some sort of comparative doctrine of established religions, if it is to serve its purpose within a pluralistic, mechanistic, scientific world view. 'We explain the fact that the Milky Way is there by the doctrine of creation,' he wrote, 'but how do we explain that the Bhagavad-gita is there?' Thirty years later, Cantwell's question became Maurice Wiles' concern, and proved his prophetic anticipation for the clash of faiths that became evident after September 11, 2001.

How is Theology Possible?

"In asking the question of God, man must already have some idea of God, for every question has its direction, and it is impossible to seek anything without having some understanding of what is sought, however vague and minimal that understanding be." John Mcquarrie sets the guideline questions, posted in the aftermath of the 'Honest to God' debate, which Maurice Wiles has reiterated as themes of his book, What is Theology?

- What is the structure of this question? (phenomenological exploration of God's question)

- How should it properly be formulated? - What is already implicit in the question?

- What conditions would have to be fulfilled for it to receive an affirmative answer?

Difficulties of Theology:

In defining the 'Elusive Subject,' wiles has to define the relation between 'Faith and the Theologian,' where he states, "Theology is parasitic upon religion. If there is no religious faith, there would be no theology." Early on he proposes that, "the Christian theologian has to ask about the relation of his study to the study of other religions."

Wiles develops his penetrating insightful approach in two linked essays, Christian theology from the inside, in which he replies to his predecessor John Robinson quest in Honest to God.

Biblical studies; the language, the text, ... intention, reliability, and revelation in words, events and finally in Christ. He ably approaches Church history analytically with a patristic reflection; in Christian doctrine he uses Pope John 23rd opening address to Vatican II, "the substance of the ancient doctrine, contained in the deposit of faith is one thing; its formulation is quite another." He finalize his treatment frontal part using philosophical tests in three main arguments: Ontological, Cosmological, and Theological.

The difficulty is not new, confirms Wiles quoting Clement of Alexandria, "Knowing of God, not of what he is but of what he is not," the 'Via Negativa' developed by pseudo-Dionysius as the Apophatic mystical theology which stormed medieval scholastic European thought. This is Wiles debut of theological elusiveness before he evaluates the impact of natural sciences, human sciences, and history emphasizing that Christianity sees itself as rooted in history in a uniqe way. "Christianity is historical in a sense in which no other religion is, for it stands or falls by certain events which are alleged to have taken place during a particular period..."

How Wiles Mind changed?

Maurice Wiles published his book, based on his established lectures at King's college, and Oxford, in 1976 just five years after the 3-volume Pelican Guide to Modern Theology, edited by Hanson. Although he started his distinguished academic career as a fairly conservative theologian in the moderate evangelical tradition, he eventually became one of the most radical and controversial scholars of his generation. Wiles was, initially anyway, a patristic scholar concerned with the ways in which the earliest Christian theologians expressed their faith. Two of his first books - The Spiritual Gospel (1960) and The Divine Apostle (1967), written during his Cambridge years - were widely welcomed, while The Christian Fathers (1966) became a standard textbook for theological students. In his Hulsean Lectures at Cambridge in 1973 he displayed his very considerable intellectual power and said: "It is questionable how far we can know what was explicitly taught by Jesus; in so far as we can, it was taught within a first-century setting and needs translation before it can be incorporated into contemporary doctrine." He added,"Theology is a continually changing and essentially temporary task. All religious language is unsatisfactory. But another book, The Making of Christian Doctrine (1967), displayed a very different approach, questioning the extent to which theological statement can be passed from age to age; and in The Remaking of Christian Doctrine (1974) he suggested that the critical methods which had been applied to the Bible for more than a century now needed to be applied also to doctrine. This led him to raise the question, in a contribution to a highly controversial volume of essays, The Myth of God Incarnate (1977), of whether or not the concept of incarnation is sufficiently intelligible to remain in use.

Maurice Wiles:

The late Rev. Maurice Wiles, one of the leading theologians of the Church of England was Regius Professor of Divinity and a Canon of Christ Church, Oxford, from 1970 to 1991; he was previously Professor of Christian Doctrine at King's College, London, and Dean of Clare College, Cambridge. His work was known and studied throughout the English- speaking world.

It was concern for the modern world and a passion for truth which led Wiles into theology, and away from his evangelical roots. He joined the succession of English patrologists who have argued that the heretics were sometimes treated unfairly by the orthodox. An article, In Defence Of Arius (1962), led to substantial work on 4th-century Christology, balanced by a shift towards writing on modern theology. His inaugural lecture at King's was on "doctrinal criticism", following a controversial article entitled Does Christology Rest On A Mistake? His probings were lucid, always courteous, and revealed a scholar catching up on those areas of his discipline which the English system had underinvested in, including continental systematic theology.
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Maurice Wiles, What is Theology?
Oxford University Press 1976 IBSN 0 19 289066 2
Wiles discusses Christian theology from the point of view of Christians reflecting on their own theology as well as the influence of Christian theology on other studies. In the Chapter entitled "Christian Theology From the Inside," Wiles discusses the language barrier confronted by the Biblical student, the dilemmas of presented from competing texts, the importance of knowing the context of the writings, the usefulness of recognizing the author's sources, the interpretation of the author's intention, and the question of reliability of the text. Wiles summarizes critical inquiry of the Bible in three ways that the Biblical revelation has been understood. 1) It is a revelation in words; 2) it is a revelation in events; and, 3) it is a revelation in Christ. Wiles discusses the role of Church history influencing our understanding of Christ and the importance of critical scrutiny of documentary evidence. He explores the question of whether it is possible to the study Christian doctrine from an open and critical viewpoint. Lastly, Wiles reviews the fundamental predisposition of man to a belief in God in his discussion of a philosophy of religion.
The second major division of the book discusses the impact of other studies on theology. In his discussion of the natural sciences, Wiles contemplates the relationship and conflict between theologians and scientists. Wiles correctly observes that science and religion are concerned with different questions and that there is no need for conflict between science and religion. In summary, the scientist encounters conflict with the theologian when he extends his conclusions beyond the scientific method, and the theologian encounters conflict with the scientist when he extends his beliefs beyond a critical understanding of his theology. In his discussion of the human sciences, Wiles argues that the theologian cannot ignore the influence of psychology and sociology. Lastly, Wiles reviews the impact of historical study on theology.
Wiles concludes that Christian theology is the study of the Bible, the history of the Church, the philosophical assumptions that are implicit in the acceptance of the Christian faith as true, and the practical application in worship and ethics. He adds that theology brings these studies together ". . . into a coherent understanding of the world as of the object of God's creative activity and redemptive love in Christ." Lastly, Wiles concludes that the study of theology cannot ignore the findings of other disciplines.
My reading of the book found Wiles writing style difficult to follow and understand in its first reading. Its treatment of the impact of the natural sciences on theology confirmed my own reflections on this issue. I find this book a useful reference and would recommend the book on the basis of its treatment of that issue alone. In general, I find a second reading of the book more understandable and would recommend this book to anyone as a reference text for a survey of theological issues.
Albert Garrou
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