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Covert Entry : Spies, Lies and Crimes Inside Canada's Secret Service ePub download

by Andrew Mitrovica

  • Author: Andrew Mitrovica
  • ISBN: 0385660294
  • ISBN13: 978-0385660297
  • ePub: 1144 kb | FB2: 1771 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Doubleday Canada, Limited (2003)
  • Pages: 368
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 434
  • Format: docx lrf doc mbr
Covert Entry : Spies, Lies and Crimes Inside Canada's Secret Service ePub download

Andrew Mitrovica's Covert Entry is one of the first in-depth looks inside this clandestine world.

Andrew Mitrovica's Covert Entry is one of the first in-depth looks inside this clandestine world. The book revolves around John Farrell, an ex-street gang leader who went on to become a star agent of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. Before joining CSIS, Farrell worked as a prison guard and Canada Post security officer.

Covert Entry: Spies, Lies and Crimes Inside Canada’s Secret Service. Toronto: Random House Canada, 2002. Since the establishment of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. CSIS) in 1984, opportunities for Canadians to get a glimpse of the inner work- ings of our domestic secret service have been few and far between. The literature on the topic remains scarce and the release of Andrew Mitrovica’s Covert Entry triggered high hopes of seeing a contemporary, in-depth look into CSIS activities finally reaching the shelves of our bookstores and libraries.

Senior Journalist and Writer (Author of Covert Entry: Spies, Lies and Crimes Inside Canada’s Secret Service) in discussion with Alnoor Gova and Anushka Azadi.

Book Description Random House of Canada Ltd, 2002. Condition: New. Ships with Tracking Number!

Book Description Random House of Canada Ltd, 2002.

By Andrew MitrovicaAuthor of Covert Entry: Spies, Lies, and Crimes Inside Canada's Secret Service. 11, 2001, slipped into America from Canada. That myth was given renewed life earlier this week when the newly minted and haltingly ill-informed . Fr. April 24, 2009timer4 min. read. homeland security secretary, Janet Napolitano, parroted the falsehood in a CBC interview. Napolitano's remarks have provoked a flurry of diplomatic backtracking and tsk-tsking from the usual political and so-called national security pundits who populate the airwaves these days.

Few journalists have come close to rivalling Andrew Mitrovica at unveiling the stories CSIS does not want told.

Set up as a civilian force in the early eighties after the RCMP spy service A unique, unprecedented look at the inner workings of our domestic secret service by a leading investigative reporter. An alarming portrait of incompetence - and worse - inside the agency that is supposed to protect us from terrorism. Few journalists have come close to rivalling Andrew Mitrovica at unveiling the stories CSIS does not want told.

Set up as a civilian force in the early eighties after the RCMP spy service was abolished for criminal excesses, no news is good news for the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS). This country’s spymasters work diligently to prevent journalists, politicians and watchdog agencies from prying into their secret world. Like Philip Agee’sInside the Company: CIA Diary, Mitrovica’s book delivers a ground-level, day-to-day look at who is actually running the show in clandestine operations inside Canada.

and mail boxes (Andrew Mitrovica, Covert Entry: Spies, Lies and Crimes Inside Canada's Secret Service).

They illegally planted a listening device in a postal station and stole keys from a postal depot to break into apartment buildings and mail boxes (Andrew Mitrovica, Covert Entry: Spies, Lies and Crimes Inside Canada's Secret Service). CSIS has always denied these activities. CUPW was not the only union of interest to CSIS. From the post: To provide you with an example, a criminal incident (including white collar crime and financial fraud) involving foreign nationals, which happened in a country in Europe is under investigation.

until now By Jorgen Christiansen (1999) (INFO) Mind Control, World Control By Jim Keith (1998) (INFO) Mind Control: The Ancient Art of Psychological Warfare By Haha Lung (2006) (INFO) Covert Entry: Spies, Lies and Crimes Inside Canada’s Secret Service By Andrew Mitrovica (2003) (INFO) Suburban Spies (2007) (INFO) Cointelpro 101 (2011) (INFO) The Setup: Memoirs of an NSA Black Operation (2007) (INFO)

Mitrovica, Andrew, Covert Entry: Spies, Lies and Crimes Inside Canada's Secret Service (Toronto . Mitrovica, Andrew and Sallot, Jeff, CSIS agent destroyed Air-India evidence, The Globe and Mail, January 26 (2000), pp. 1–2.

Mitrovica, Andrew, Covert Entry: Spies, Lies and Crimes Inside Canada's Secret Service (Toronto: Random House, 2002). Nislow, Jennifer, As clear as glass: With the ‘Broken Windows’ thesis, George Kelling puts things into focus for policing, Law Enforcement News, Volume 29, Numbers 611/612 (2003), pp. 1–3.

Gavidor
Generally unknown facts, politically incorrect.
Dukinos
This is a book written about John Farrell, a postal inspector for Canada Post. John is paid to spy on Canada Post employees and union leaders. Most of the time there is no clear reason why he is spying on these employees, except to please senior officials. He would sneak into garbage, read incoming & outgoing mail, and keep large dossiers on each employee. This was done without cause, without court orders, and wasted hundreds of thousands of dollars of tax payers money.
Afterwards, John is recruited by CSIS.
It should be noted that CSIS was started after the RCMP spy service was abolished for fraud. This book proves that while the RCMP spy service was modified to become CSIS, nothing that was important changed. Fraud was ongoing, and pure incompetence is still running rampant.
Secret information often falls into the wrong hands, including that of petty criminals. Laws are broken for no clear reason. Money is wasted on investigating non-matters while important investigations are forgotten about. Laws are broken for friends or politicians. Furthermore, this is never reported, because CSIS is free from all accountability, and are capable of silencing anyone who speaks out against them.
What is probably worse is that this is a clear indication that Canada is currently incapable of protecting our country from terrorism. CSIS is out there more for the sake of being seen then actually doing something.
I hope that everyone reads this, too many Canadians are under the illusion that the RCMP and CSIS are actually here to protect its people. It wouldn't take much to outsmart either of these organizations.
Kamick
The first half of this book is dedicated to "John Farrell" and his life in Canada Post (and other places). I suggest skipping the first half of the book, it's boring and extraneous. Once you pass the first part of the book, you get to continue reading about how 'great' John is and how 'awful' he was treated. In fact, thinking about it, you can probably skip the entire book and know what it was about with this simple summary: John Farrell is amazing while CSIS is a dastardly and terrible organization. This is the entire point of the book.
If you are able to look beyond the jaded and biased view of the author (who, kindly enough, states his bias early on) you can see some of how CSIS operates with its 'informants.' John Farrell was nothing more than an informant who was well liked by his 'higher ups.' There are some real gems of information revealed in the book but on the whole, it isn't a wonderful piece of reporting - it's a biased piece of reporting.
Kendis
I found this book exciting, thrilling and captivating. After seeing it on Canada A.M talk show. I thought it was an important and interesting book to read? It reads like a fiction novel and raises some very important questions about the state of security in a post September environment. The principle character in Covert Entry was recruited by CSIS because of his criminal background and his abilities to get things done at whatever the cost. He seemed to be the only one to actually break the law to get things done in the name of national Security.
This book raises some very serious questions and places little confidence in Csis and the government of Canada to protect Canadian form Terrorism and foreign spies.
Overall, an outstanding book.
Steelraven
This book shines a necessary light on the inner workings of Canada's spy service....more like Keystone Kops service. As a Canadian, I was shocked and appalled by by what the author has uncovered and I am at a loss to undertsand how people can get away with such incompetence and corruption in the name of national security. Beyond that, I found the book really drew me into the world of spies and intrigue and showed how Canada really is a place teeming with espionage. I recommend this book highly. A real page-turner.
roternow
People are always frightened by the truth, but as we all know the truth is the only way we can change as hard as it seems. This book oppens the eyes into what we think or don't think about government. Open your mind and this book will educate you on the real world not the TV world.
Findlay Wihlidal
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