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seven days in the art World ePub download

by SARAH THORNTON

  • Author: SARAH THORNTON
  • ISBN: 1847080375
  • ISBN13: 978-1847080370
  • ePub: 1778 kb | FB2: 1510 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Granta Books (January 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 304
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 621
  • Format: lrf lit mobi docx
seven days in the art World ePub download

Also by sarah thornton. One theme that runs through the narratives of Seven Days in the Art World is that contemporary art has become a kind of alternative religion for atheists.

Also by sarah thornton. SEVEN DAYS IN THE Art World. W. norton & company new york london. The artist Francis Bacon once said that when Man realizes that he is just an accident in the greater scheme of things, he can only beguile himself for a time.

Seven day-in-the-life chapters, each focusing on a different facet of the contemporary art world and its .

Seven day-in-the-life chapters, each focusing on a different facet of the contemporary art world and its globe-trotting Prada-clad tribe. A freelance journalist with a background in sociology, Thornton spent five years air-kissing her way through art fairs, auction houses and artists’ studios as a participant observer intent on decoding the manners and mores of this globe-­trotting Prada-clad tribe.

The art market has been booming. Museum attendance is surging. More people than ever call themselves artists. Contemporary art has become a mass entertainment, a luxury good, a job description, and, for some, a kind of alternative religion

The book is titled Seven Days in the Art World, which very clearly labels it as a tourist's guidebook, so it might as well be labelled Lonely . Art World, or How to Travel the Art World with No Money and Without Leaving Your Couch.

The book is titled Seven Days in the Art World, which very clearly labels it as a tourist's guidebook, so it might as well be labelled Lonely Planet: Art World, or Let's Go! Art World, or How to Travel the Art World with No Money and Without Leaving Your Couch. It's Seven Days, which is the length of time most tourists give to some "foreign locale. In seven days, you I hate this book. Or more accurately, I hate what this book focuses on. Now I need to state that my hatred is pretty moronic

Includes bibliographical references (p. 263-265) and index. The art market has been booming.

Includes bibliographical references (p. Contemporary art has become a mass entertainment, a luxury good, a job description, and, for some, a kind of alternative religion

I’m sitting alone in F200, a windowless classroom with cement walls in which long-life fluorescent lights cast a gray glow.

I’m sitting alone in F200, a windowless classroom with cement walls in which long-life fluorescent lights cast a gray glow. e within from the mindless seductions of the Southern California sun. I survey the thin brown carpet, forty chairs, four tables, two chalkboards, and lone jumbo beanbag, trying to imagine how great artists get made in this airless institutional space. Michael Asher enters. He has a stoop and a bowlegged gait

This book helps us understand how confused the elitist tendencies of the art establishment have made the world of ar. The remaining 5 days were pretty dull writing - but I wanted to make sure I read through each of the events. I suppose her studio visit was most hilariously odd.

This book helps us understand how confused the elitist tendencies of the art establishment have made the world of art. But it is also misleading - because the topic is NOT the "Art World". Ms. Thornton covers only that segment of art that she enjoys - then claims it’s exceptionally important. She also fails to be a neutral writer or ethnographer. This book is not ethnography. It wasn’t a visit to a studio - but to a factory with the tour given by the CEO.

Day one in the art world: an art auction in New York. Thornton is aware of her own limitations and falls into their trap. This is followed by a student seminar in California; an art fair in Basel; Turner Prize judging at the Tate; an art magazine in Manhattan; a studio visit in Toyama; and the seventh day is the launch of the Venice Biennale. It is also impossible, she concedes, to be truly comprehensive, so, while she colourfully refracts the art world through a prism of perspectives, there is a sense of more worlds that have yet to be put into words

She also, more weirdly, hangs out at Artforum,.

Seven Days in the Art World by Sarah Thornton. W W Norton & Co Inc,2008
Steep
This book helps us understand how confused the elitist tendencies of the art establishment have made the world of art. But it is also misleading - because the topic is NOT the "Art World". Ms. Thornton covers only that segment of art that she enjoys - then claims it’s exceptionally important. She also fails to be a neutral writer or ethnographer.

This book is not ethnography. Ethnography involves a disinterested observer (or observer with a pre-existing opinion taking an intentionally neutral position) and going into an environment with people to study their interactions. First, and foremost, to be valid ethnography it requires that the writer describe how the specific population segment they study relates to other populations.

It’s also not ethnography in that it’s mostly record of interviews - interviews that don’t add much. That it’s reporting isn’t surprising - her career has been spent reporting. But the claim to be much more is specious.

Ms. Thornton does admit in her afterword to the later edition to being an enthusiast for contemporary art - and seems incapable of understanding or explaining where contemporaray fits up against a much, much larger world of art and set of artists. (I suppose it was a great sales tactic though for hyping up the book and getting it bought by a publisher.)

She also fails to sort out how to observe neutrally - no matter her opinion. Many of the characters she’s with assume persona’s of "edgy" while truly being pretty mundane - a fact she misses. She also fails to see (apparently) that they are rehashing essentially the same things that have been made for nearly 70 years...that little of the theories postulated by the collectors, critics, or artists are “new”.

The writing covering the first two days is quite compelling and I enjoyed those parts (tho’ frustrated by her inability to be an ethnographer). The remaining 5 days were pretty dull writing - but I wanted to make sure I read through each of the events. I suppose her “studio visit” was most hilariously odd. It wasn’t a visit to a studio - but to a factory with the tour given by the CEO. Yet rather than search ethnographically to understand and give insight to this variation, she wholeheartedly embraces the CEO.

As a last thought, she is fascinated by art that has the approval of this elite crowd - it’s the art she embraces. What strikes me is that she seems to lack the interest and enthusiasm for art that doesn’t have that approval - art which probes the depths of the human and expresses what’s essentially human. Certainly we could all argue about what makes something to be art and never resolve that question - because everyone answers the question differently. But this fact is what is so sadly missing from this book - the only important question in the true world of art.
Fenrikasa
This book was just okay...nothing terribly interesting about it. Overall, I enjoyed the chapter about the Christie's auction the most, as it seemed like a very entertaining "show". The chapter called "The Magazine" was so boring and esoteric that it was virtually unreadable. The rest of the chapters were alright, with a mix of interesting and mind-numbingly dull sections....(a bit how I feel going to a modern-art gallery itself). I did expect to learn more about the art world than I did in this book, so it ended up being fairly disappointing in that respect. The saddest aspect of all is that I had a suspicion confirmed...the art world at this level is controlled by the rich and elite, so it's just another big corporate business! (Just read the chapter about the "artist" Murakami and you'll see what I mean).
happy light
This book is an ethnography (the writer as participant/observer) about the art world. Its message about art as a commodity and the art scene as a performance piece in itself came as no surprise to me as my husband is an artist. At one time we lived in New York and he was represented by a New York Gallery. When you read this book you will understand why we moved back to Alaska. Being an artist in the art world is like wearing a sign on your back that says 'hit me' or else feeling like you're some kind of wind-up toy that must perform in a set way.

The book is divided into seven chapters, each elucidating one specific aspect of the art world. These chapters are:

The Auction - About a Christie's big-time auction in New York
The Crit - About an art criticism class at CalArts
The Fair - The Basel Art Fair in Switzerland
The Prize - The in's and out's of the Turner prize, awarded by Britain's Tate Museum
The Magazine - About Artforum, an art magazine
The Studio Visit - Takeshi Murakami's studio and his work as an artist and entrepreneur
The Biennale - The Venice Biennale (or Studio 54 revisited)

The commodification of art along with the hierarchy of dealers, collectors, curators and artists is in place all along the art feeding chain. While it was no surprise to me, it edified the sad state of the affairs in the art world. This book was written during the economic and art boom so the situation has likely changed along with the expendable money available to hedge fund founders and the general public.

I was amazed to find out that one can not just buy art. Dealers like to choose who they will sell art to - they want art to go to an A-list collector and often collectors get on line to buy a piece of art by a particular artist. Production often does not meet the needs of consumption.

If you are interested in details of the art world, you might enjoy this book. If you're easily jaded or have a weak stomach, I'd skip it. It goes into all the gory details of every aspect of art, from the artist who produces the work on up (or is it down)
Wymefw
LOVED this book, could not put it down. I am an artist and bought this based upon the other reviews and I am glad I did. I learned more about the art world and how it works. This book is like an insider's view of how the art world works, how galleries work and what each player in the game does. Very good information that you can use to educate yourself about the art world game in order to become more successful.
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