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Star Wars: X-Wing: Mercy Kill ePub download

by Aaron Allston

  • Author: Aaron Allston
  • ISBN: 1780891032
  • ISBN13: 978-1780891033
  • ePub: 1794 kb | FB2: 1747 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Century; hardcover edition (2012)
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 415
  • Format: lrf lit txt rtf
Star Wars: X-Wing: Mercy Kill ePub download

It is a side novel to Fate of the Jedi: Apocalypse, the ninth and final volume of the Fate of the Jedi series.

It is a side novel to Fate of the Jedi: Apocalypse, the ninth and final volume of the Fate of the Jedi series. It was written by Aaron Allston and features Wraith Squadron. The novel was announced on August 14, 2010 at Celebration V, and took the slot of the previously canceled Imperial Commando 2 novel. It was released on August 7, 2012.

Readers of Fate of the Jedi will know Thaal's role in Moff Lecersen's schemes and Mr. Allston does not present information from his viewpoint except at the climax.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. The intrepid spies, pilots, and sharpshooters of Wraith Squadron are back in an all-new Star Wars adventure, which transpires just after the events of the Fate of the Jedi series! Three decades have passed since. The intrepid spies, pilots, and sharpshooters of Wraith Squadron are back in an all-new Star Wars adventure, which transpires just after the events of the Fate of the Jedi series! Three decades have passed since Wraith Squadron carried out its last mission. Taking on the most dangerous and daring operations, the rogues and misfits of the elite X-Wing unit became legends of the Rebellion and the Second Galactic Civil War, before breaking up and going their separate ways

Star Wars: X-wing is a ten-book series of Star Wars novels by Michael A. Stackpole and Aaron Allston.

Star Wars: X-wing is a ten-book series of Star Wars novels by Michael A. Stackpole's contributions cover the adventures of a new Rogue Squadron formed by Wedge Antilles, while Allston's focus on Wraith Squadron, another creation of Antilles'. The first seven novels take place . –7.

Star Wars: X-Wing: Mercy Kill is a work of fiction. This book contains an excerpt from Star Wars: Scoundrels by Timothy Zahn

Star Wars: X-Wing: Mercy Kill is a work of fiction. Names, places, and incidents either are products of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. This book contains an excerpt from Star Wars: Scoundrels by Timothy Zahn. eISBN: 978-0-345-53480-4.

X-Wing - Mercy Kill: Oh, mercy. This was a bit of a struggle to read. The much-anticipated return by Allston to the Wraiths was a let down. The whole time I was reading this novel I felt like I was. Пользовательский отзыв - Book Verdict.

Start by marking Mercy Kill (Star Wars: X-Wing, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The X-Wing/Wraith Squadron books are one of the most popular series in the history of Star Wars novels

The X-Wing/Wraith Squadron books are one of the most popular series in the history of Star Wars novels. Now, the intrepid spy/pilots of Wraith Squadron are back in an all-new Star Wars adventure set in the time just after the events of the New York Times bestselling Fate of the Jedi series! Wraith Squadron was Wedge Antilles's boldest creation: a covert-action unit of X-Wing fighters, its pilots drawn from the dregs of other units, castoffs and rejects given one last chance.

Beazekelv
Michael Stackpole's first four X-Wing novels set a very high standard in Star Wars fiction: interesting new characters, well-written space battles, and intricate plots which upheld the spirit of adventure from the films. It was a tough act to follow but Aaron Allston did a superb job with his X-Wing stories focused on Wraith Squadron. The Wraiths were more a band of misfits than the Rogues and Mr. Allston showed an immediate ability to interject significant humor into their escapades. Ewoks, Gamorreans: it was hard to predict what unexpected species might show up next. In the dozens and dozens of Star Wars novels published since 1991, the X-Wing series continues to be part of the gold standard of stories that keep the spirit and flame of the films alive.

This X-Wing legacy, combined with my fatigue from plowing through the three giant series set chronologically just before Mercy Kill (the New Jedi Order, Legacy of the Force, and Fate of the Jedi), raised my excitement level tremendously high for this book. While I quite enjoyed reading it and laughed out loud at some of the banter and situations, it wasn't quite on par with what's come before. The story is set 43 years after Return of the Jedi and there are not many familiar characters. I'm generally pleased to meet new folks in these books after so many stories have been written but a fair number of the protagonists in Mercy Kill didn't register much of an impact. One who does register is Voort "Piggy" saBinring, the genetically-enhanced Gamorrean genius who was part of the formative years of Wraith Squadron. Voort is struggling with a deeply-rooted grief from a trauma during the Yuuzhan Vong war. The two big series set after the New Jedi Order didn't spend much time on the repercussions of the Vong conflict and it's great to see Mr. Allston tackle the subject. Voort's past trauma is enflamed by a new team member who turns out to be a Yuuzhan Vong. Both are damaged people and their relationship in the book is one of its highlights as each learns from the other.

Voort's team also features Myri Antilles, younger daughter of familiar character Wedge, along with several people with ties to the team of old. Turman, a Clawdite shape-shifter, has numerous entertaining moments as he is forced to play the front man on multiple missions. A second team joins the story halfway through and I will be honest: at that point I lost track of who some of the involved Wraiths were, especially since they are referred to by their real names, their numerical designations, and joke nicknames all intermingled. The sprawl in characters weakened the second half of the story as almost no one had a chance to benefit from much characterization.

Mercy Kill's plot picks up on a leftover strand from Fate of the Jedi: old character Garik "Face" Loran shows up to task Voort and company with investigating General Stavin Thaal as a potential member of the Lecersen Conspiracy. Readers of Fate of the Jedi will know Thaal's role in Moff Lecersen's schemes and Mr. Allston does not present information from his viewpoint except at the climax. It's a good concept for a stealth mission for the Rogues: however, it can be hard at times to feel involved in its outcome, as Thaal's fate after the epic struggles in Fate of the Jedi seems rather a footnote.

The book focuses more on ground-based sneaking around than starfighter combat, which it features relatively little of. The objectives of the Wraiths are doled out in sparing parcels and the reader is generally left guessing as to why they are taking the particular actions that are portrayed. Generally the meaning of a scene is revealed at the end and the plot advances onward to the next briefly-confusing sequence. Occasionally I found the manner in which information was doled out frustrating, but at the same time it put me in the mind of one of the rookie members of the team, struggling to keep up with the leaders' plans. Everything comes plenty clear at the climax and overall the story is satisfying.

Mercy Kill delivers a solid and welcome dose of Star Wars-flavored fun and manages to bring forward the X-Wing vibe of old into the dramatically altered universe of a few decades later. There are several superb moments of humor (Embassy-Who-Climbs had me chortling out loud). The book wasn't a page turner but there is some sound development of Voort saBinring to accompany the intrigue. Readers who haven't experienced the three sprawling series set before it may wish at a minimum to find a summary of the key events so as to place the details of Mercy Kill into proper context.
Mayno
When I bought this book I expected a action packed thiller, but what you get is basically a boring book about spying. The main plot of this book deals with a squad of former elite X-Wing pilots coming back together to deal with a traitorous General that threatens the Galactic Alliance. On paper this sounds interesting, but a good majority of this book is pointless filler about spying. It takes almost 200pgs just to actually get some actual action that hardly lasts. Personally, I would only recommend this book if your big fan of the X-Wing series.
Yozshujinn
Do you remember fondly the Star Wars novels of the 90s? Are you into Star Wars but a newcomer to the Expanded Universe? Do you enjoy your Star Wars with an undertone of comedy, so long as a certain floppy-eared terror is nowhere in sight? If so, X-Wing: Mercy Kill may be a good book for you to check out.

Unlike most of the books being released set in the "modern" era of the Star Wars universe (44 ABY--i.e., 44 Years post-Episode IV), Mercy Kill lets you jump right in, more or less without knowing the situation to that point. A lot of the others you could read cold, but they wouldn't make much sense. Mercy Kill, however, has little to do with the ongoing plot of the Expanded Universe. It's rooted in recent events, but the setup is very simple and easily grasped. It would pay to know the characters from the X-Wing novels of the 90s, but even that is not really necessary. You could check out three or four articles on Wookiepedia and be fine--I did, just to refresh my memory.

So....here's what you need to know. In the 90s, they published a series of comics and then novels based around Rogue Squadron, led by Wedge Antilles and a number of the X-Wing pilots from the films along with some new faces. These comics and the first four novels were written by Michael Stackpole, but after the fourth he dropped out for a while citing other commitments he had to work on. So they hired in Aaron Allston to continue the series. Allston decided to let the Rogues go off on their own adventures while he created a new team for his novels--Wraith Squadron, a team of X-Wing pilots who would work equally well as a ground-based commando team. The result was a cross between The A-Team and The Dirty Dozen, with some aerial action thrown in. For the purposes of this new novel, notable characters included Garik "Face" Loran, a child star turned soldier and the eventual commander of the Wraiths; and Voort "Piggy" SaBinring, a genetically-modified Gamorrean. There are a few other returning faces, but these were the better developed and you can probably get by just knowing them.

The Star Wars publishing event of the early 2000s was the New Jedi Order series, in which a race of extra-galactic aliens called the Yuuzhan Vong invaded the Galaxy Far, Far Away and sought to subjugate its people. They almost did it, and they changed the way Star Wars novels worked in the process. Characters--MAIN CHARACTERS--died. Chewbacca, Han and Leia's youngest son Anakin Solo, and countless others fell to the military might of the invaders. There have been other upheavals since, most notably a second Galactic Civil War when Han and Leia's oldest son Jacen Solo fell to the Dark Side. In the aftermath of that war, a conspiracy was formed to take over both the Galactic Alliance and the Empire and merge them together once again, recapturing the glory of the height of the Old Empire. This conspiracy failed, but it may not have been completely rooted out.....

In this book, Garik Loran is called out of retirement by the head of the Alliance military. He wants Loran to quietly look into rumors that an up-and-coming officer may have been connected to the Lecerson Conspiracy. Wraith Squadron is back in business! The resulting adventure is a fun trip, dealing both in nostalgia for those of us who read the adventures of the original Wraiths long ago and in action that newer fans can get into, all the while serving up Allston's signature undertone of humor mixed with heart. I heartily recommend it. The one caveat I will mention for fans of the original books is that there is comparatively little aerial combat in this book. The plot doesn't call for it, and I certainly didn't really miss it too much, but some may be disappointed by that.

If you want more reading suggestions, the X-Wing: Rogue Squadron comics and X-Wing novels are quite good. If you wanted to enhance your experience with this book, I would have you read at least the novels, but you may not have the patience for all nine of the previous books. If not, I won't hold it against you.
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