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A Right to Die: A Nero Wolfe Mystery ePub download

by Rex STOUT

  • Author: Rex STOUT
  • ISBN: 0006161707
  • ISBN13: 978-0006161707
  • ePub: 1441 kb | FB2: 1120 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bantam Books; First edition. edition (1965)
  • Pages: 191
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 198
  • Format: doc txt mbr rtf
A Right to Die: A Nero Wolfe Mystery ePub download

A Right to Die is a Nero Wolfe detective novel by Rex Stout, first published by the Viking Press in 1964. The novel is set against the background of the Civil Rights Act conflict during the early Johnson Administration.

A Right to Die is a Nero Wolfe detective novel by Rex Stout, first published by the Viking Press in 1964.

A Right to Die" is one of Rex Stout's last if not the last of Nero Wolf mystery. And it is true his later works were not his best. It's probably Rex Stout getting his 2 cents in on the Civil Rights movements of 1964. The biggest problem with his later works is Wolf and Archie, Saul and Cramer have been exactly the same as they were in 1934 only the rest of the world has aged. A middle aged black man who gave Wolf some information in West Virginia when he was a 21 year old kid, as Archie described him, has a son marrying a white girl and wants to find out what's wrong.

Any Nero Wolfe mystery is a guilty pleasure to read. But this one is especially well written and a real puzzler of a mystery. Written during the Civl Rights era of the 1960s it is still strangely topical today as it addresses the struggle of African Americans for justice in a white man's world. In A Right to Die, a decent story about the murder of a civil rights crusader, Rex Stout has botched his ordinarily masterful management of the Brownstone by allowing Archie and Wolfe to stray into the minefield of liberal white guilt. The fact that the two are treading unfamiliar and dangerous ground is obvious as soon as they begin the journey.

What others are saying. A Right To Die - Nero Wolfe must solve the murder of a wealthy white woman engaged to marry a black man in 1960's America. The case may not be open and shut. ISBN: 9780670261406 Publisher: Viking Press Published Date: 1969. Man's brain, enlarged fortuitously, invented words in an ambitious attempt to learn how to think, only to have them usurped by his emotions. Design by S. Summit, 1969 via Montague Projects.

Rex Stout REX STOUT, the creator of Nero Wolfe . Rex Stout died in 1975 at the age of eighty-eight.

Rex Stout REX STOUT, the creator of Nero Wolfe, was born in Noblesville, Indiana, in 1886, the sixth of nine children of John and Lucetta Todhunter Stout, both Quakers. Shortly after his birth. A month before his death he published his seventy-second Nero Wolfe mystery, A Family Affair. Ten years later a seventy-third Nero Wolfe mystery was discovered and published in Death Times Three. The Rex Stout Library. A Right to Die. Trio for Blunt Instruments.

Rex Stout died in 1975 at the age of eighty-nine. And what a wonderful sanctuary Rex Stout has provided millions of readers for over half a century by introducing the world to Nero Wolfe. Ten years later, a seventy-third Nero Wolfe mystery was discovered and published in Death Times Three. As the century fades, Wolfe lives on, fresh and current as ever.

The Nero Wolfe corpus was nominated Best Mystery Series of the Century at Bouchercon XXXI . Viking Press.

The Nero Wolfe corpus was nominated Best Mystery Series of the Century at Bouchercon XXXI, the world's largest mystery convention, and Rex Stout was nominated Best Mystery Writer of the Century. In addition to writing fiction, Stout was a prominent public intellectual for decades. He was active in the early years of the American Civil Liberties Union and a founder of the Vanguard Press. For specific publication history, including original magazine appearances, see entries for individual titles.

Nero Wolfe is a fictional character, an armchair detective created in 1934 by the American mystery writer Rex Stout. Wolfe's confidential assistant Archie Goodwin narrates the cases of the detective genius

Nero Wolfe is a fictional character, an armchair detective created in 1934 by the American mystery writer Rex Stout. Wolfe's confidential assistant Archie Goodwin narrates the cases of the detective genius. Stout wrote 33 novels and 39 short stories from 1934 to 1975, with most of them set in New York City. Wolfe's residence, a luxurious brownstone on West 35th Street, features prominently in the series. Many radio, television and film adaptations have been made from the stories

Globus
Before I had heard of the books, the only places that I had seen the name Nero Wolfe was with a TV show that starred Timothy Hutton and an Old-Time-Radio Show with Sydney Greenstreet (who was a famous actor of the 40s and 50s and opposite Bogart in the Maltese Falcon). It wasn't until a friend of mine mentioned that the author was Rex Stout and like the Saint, Bulldog Drummond, or Philip Marlowe there was a whole series of books and short stories that involved the character. I decided to go and look for the books.
One of the things that attracted me to the Nero Wolfe stories is that unlike some other golden age detective novels, they are supposed to be ageless. That is strip the years out of them and you could have them happen in the late 30s up to the most modern times. However, this one is a little aged. Simply, because the simply sanded references to pre-'68 Civil Rights Groups in the NYC (and northern states) and cordial tone the leadership of these group has among the leaders with others in the community.
That said, the other disappointing thing about this story is that it references another earlier novel by Stout. You don't need to have read it to get the reference. There is some exposition between Wolfe and one of the other main characters to fill you in on the reference, but still that is another minor quibble about a set of stories that according to some you can pick up anyplace and read without having to read previous volumes to understand some "noodle incident" referred to by the characters.
Okay so what is the story about? Well in short it starts out with Wolfe and his main assistance Archie Goodwin trying to help the father of a black man find out the character of a rich socialite white woman and why she would be interested in his college aged and poor son. However, that all turns when the woman ends up dead with a tool the son took from a racist cop during the Freedom Riders summer. There are some fakes and a couple of red herrings, with some details; but in the end we get it all boiled down to a racist mother of another character who had died before the story started and her need for revenge. The clue that Wolfe clicked into was a bit of English language structure that even Goodwin has a problem explaining away near the end. However, when I read it the clue that struck me was the "incident" that cause the dead woman to have left her home in Wisconsin and go to NYC. Stout seemed to do everything short of put lights up around this clue and the immediately dismiss it before tying it up near the end. I am not sure if that is because I have been reading enough of these Golden Age of Detective Novels to catch up or that I am just that good. However, the action is quick paced and the dialogue here is very good. The discussions about the niceties of Northern states racism in government (police and DAs) towards blacks is interesting to me. Since they seem to go along with what my parents told me of growing up in the 50s and 60s in places like Philly and Chicago. With this book being written and published in '64, that is amazing the author was able to recognize this fact of life. Heck, one of the characters in a bit of dialogue towards Wolfe even says that the police in NYC in the 60s are just as racist as the cops in Selma, but they do it subtle and with a smile on their face. The only other spoiler here is that the last half of the book tosses the derogatory "N" word out there from the criminal and from some of the other supporting cast. In the end this book and its characters do remind me of a modern day version of Sherlock Holmes, with the sort of off the wall but very probably explanation of how to get to the crime; a chapter where the criminal monologues the motives in Wolfe's office and with Archie Goodwin being a better version of Watson in his sort of unflappable observational way.
I am going to have to find the rest of these novels, since the writing style is very enjoyable. The book itself was short (at least at my reading speed) and I started it over lunch one day and was finished in just under 4 days of reading at lunch for 40 minutes. Hopefully the rest of the Wolfe books are just as much fun and quick.
GoodBuyMyFriends
"A Right to Die" is one of Rex Stout's last if not the last of Nero Wolf mystery. And it is true his later works were not his best. It's probably Rex Stout getting his 2 cents in on the Civil Rights movements of 1964. The biggest problem with his later works is Wolf and Archie, Saul and Cramer
have been exactly the same as they were in 1934 only the rest of the world has aged.

A middle aged black man who gave Wolf some information in West Virginia when he was a 21 year old kid, as Archie described him, has a son marrying a white girl and wants to find out what's wrong with her. Guess what, Wolf and Archie think Archie should sudduce her and it'd be over. She's murdered before this can happen. But then Archie starts thinking about the black girl who his son finally goes after. Do the math, he has to be twice the age or either. Just a little paradox that stood out for me.

Charactors, plot, and solution are really thin for Rex Stout story. The lawyer is obnoxious ok. Rest we find out what shade of black they are and villian is easily spotted by using the old technic of "why is this person being mentioned anyway?". The solution comes from considering a dipthong which really has no bearing on anything. But then you needed to look that word up anyway.

I also ordered "Some Buried Ceasar" an earlier and considerably better story.

It is a Nero Wolf and Michael Prichard is one of the best readers in the field. I do suggest the earlier works. THE RUBBER BAND, THE LEAGUE OF FRIGHTENED MEN, ETC.
Zeueli
All Rex Stout stories are either great or just good. This one is great. Archie Goodwin is the perfect first person narrator. Michael Pritchard is the ultimate reader for Nero Wolfe stories.
Whilingudw
The forty-three Nero Wolfe novels represent some of the best detective fiction ever written. Need we say more?
Dilmal
Rex Stout is a great story teller and I love Archie. Try some they are not full of gore but you'll be intrigued
.
Small Black
OMG, I wasn't sure if I'd read this one. A few pages into chapter one I recognized the characters, but kept reading and enjoying.
Stout is that good!
doesnt Do You
Rex Stout's best (I think) & last offering - a real nail-biter & most humanistic of the many I've read. Archie & Mr. Wolfe are at their best, & the plot is a real mystery to the end. Not to be missed.
Rex Stout and Nero Wolfe and unbeatable pairing
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