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A history of Antarctica ePub download

by Stephen Martin

  • Author: Stephen Martin
  • ISBN: 0731066014
  • ISBN13: 978-0731066018
  • ePub: 1222 kb | FB2: 1902 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: State Library of New South Wales Press (1996)
  • Pages: 272
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 274
  • Format: docx mbr txt rtf
A history of Antarctica ePub download

History of Antarctica Martin Stephen Неизвестно 9781921719578 : This revised and expanded book - first .

History of Antarctica Martin Stephen Неизвестно 9781921719578 : This revised and expanded book - first published in 1996 - traces the patterns of human activity in Antarctica, from the souther. A History of Antarctica is about the people of Antarctica - those who have chosen to endure the risks and enjoy the rewards of conquering the worlds most forbidding land. educational and enlightening as it is entertaining, and enthusiastically recommended for public and college library World History shelves.

A History of Antarctica book. This revised and expanded book - first published in 1996 - traces.

A History of Antarctica (Hardback). Stephen Martin (author). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. Hardback 304 Pages, Published: 03/12/2018. Publisher reprinting. Temporarily out of stock. This item has been added to your basket.

Antarctic books-a reading list The Australian Geographic Book of Antarctica, by Keith Scott (Terrey . A History of Antarctica, by Stephen Martin (Sydney: State Library of New South Wales Press, 1996).

Antarctic books-a reading list. The AAD Library at Kingston has a comprehensive collection of polar material. The books listed below have been selected for general interest. The Australian Geographic Book of Antarctica, by Keith Scott (Terrey Hills, New South Wales: Australian Geographic for the Australian Geographic Society, 1993). Antarctic Journal, by David James Hasick (Flinders Park, South Australia: Era Publications, 1993).

Who first saw Antarctic ice, and who first discovered Antarctica? Read all about The History of Antarctica and the .

Who first saw Antarctic ice, and who first discovered Antarctica? Read all about The History of Antarctica and the great explorers and discoverers here. Pacific oral history tells of a canoe voyage around AD 650 reaching Antarctic sea ice. It’s even possible, though unlikely, that an open ice pack during a balmy late summer permitted Polynesians to see and even land on the Antarctic mainland. European Discoverers. The History of Antarctica starts off with the European discoverers. Nearly 1000 years later, Europeans reached Antarctic waters.

Headland on Martin, 'A History of Antarctica'. Antarctic: Ancient Times to Modern Events. This book is a revision of one with the same title published by the State Library of New South Wales in 1996. Author: Stephen Martin. The author, Stephen Martin, is a senior librarian of the Mitchell Library in Sydney and has the advantageous situation of combining a theoretical and literary knowledge of his subject with the practical aspects of visiting Antarctic regions.

As Antarctica separated from the other land masses the Antarctic Circumpolar Current arose which caused the . Antarctica - book An Intimate Portrait of the World's Most Mysterious Continent. Antarctica - A Year on Ice DVD and Blu-ray Instant video.

As Antarctica separated from the other land masses the Antarctic Circumpolar Current arose which caused the continental weather systems to become more isolated from the rest of the world, the temperature continued to fall and an ice cap began to grow. The Southern Hemisphere today showing the edges of tectonic plate boundaries in red and Antarctica over the South Pole.

The history of Antarctica emerges from early Western theories of a vast continent, known as Terra Australis, believed to exist in the far south of the globe

The history of Antarctica emerges from early Western theories of a vast continent, known as Terra Australis, believed to exist in the far south of the globe. The term Antarctic, referring to the opposite of the Arctic Circle, was coined by Marinus of Tyre in the 2nd century AD. The rounding of the Cape of Good Hope and Cape Horn in the 15th and 16th centuries proved that Terra Australis Incognita ("Unknown Southern Land"), if it existed, was a continent in its own right

This revised and expanded book - first published in 1996 - traces the patterns of human activity in Antarctica, from the southern journeys of the 16th century to the modern expeditions of adventurers and tourists. Using material from diaries, letters, and fresh research, the book illuminates the main themes of Antarctic history with the personal stories and images of the men and women who explored, worked, and lived in this frozen and remote continent. The book examines such topics as the early Polynesian explorers, the amazing diversity of flora and fauna, the detailed geological features, etc. A History of Antarctica is about the people of Antarctica - those who have chosen to endure the risks and enjoy the rewards of conquering the world's most forbidding land. *** "...educational and enlightening as it is entertaining, and enthusiastically recommended for public and college library World History shelves." - The Midwest Book Review, Library Bookwatch, April 2013, The World History Shelf *** "Martin, writer and historian, provides an illustrated history of Antarctica from its prehistory and geography to its early modern and contemporary presence in literature, politics, and science, and elucidates the varied experiences of humanity with the continent. Both broad and detailed, the work provides a useful lens through which to view the development of contemporary science, politics and environmental action in the context of this important region. Recommended." - Choice, Vol. 51, No. 03, November 2013 *** "...a very nicely illustrated, easily readable work and at times even poetic: 'Antarctica experience takes on a deeply personal, spiritual tone: icecaps become metaphors, birds such as snow petrels become symbols of hope and contact, the trip becomes a metaphysical journey and profound experiences emerge in the stories and narratives.' Martin well deserves space on any Antarctican's bookshelf." - The Antarctican Society Newsletter, Vol. 13-14, No. 1, November 2013Ëœ