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The Taos Trappers: The Fur Trade in the Far Southwest, 1540-1846 ePub download

by David J Weber

  • Author: David J Weber
  • ISBN: 0806109440
  • ISBN13: 978-0806109442
  • ePub: 1394 kb | FB2: 1377 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press; First Edition edition (1971)
  • Pages: 263
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 489
  • Format: txt mobi lrf azw
The Taos Trappers: The Fur Trade in the Far Southwest, 1540-1846 ePub download

David Weber has written a very detailed work on the Taos trapper

David Weber has written a very detailed work on the Taos trapper. It was a fascinating period of gradual admission that Mexico's government could not control a territory that was inexorably pre conquered by men whose allegiance remained with the United States. With the declaration of war in 1846 trappers that had settled throughout New Mexico, California and as far north as Oregon would provide a reliable 5th column containing many knowledgeable guides to the United States Army for the conquest of what would become the American Southwest. 6 people found this helpful.

Fur trade - New Mexico - Taos - History, Fur trade - Southwest, New - History. Norman : University of Oklahoma Press.

The Taos Trappers book. In this comprehensive history, David J. Weber draws on Spanish, Mexican, and American sources to describe the development of the Taos trade and the early penetration of the area by French and American trappers.

Author: Weber, David J; Format: Book; xiii, 263 p. illus. The Taos trappers; the fur trade in the Far Southwest, 1540-1846 David J. Weber. Book, Online - Google Books.

In this comprehensive history, David J. Weber draws on Spanish, Mexican, and American . Great Book on Taos Area Fur Trade History. Weber draws on Spanish, Mexican, and American sources to describe the development of the Taos trade and the early. This is the classic study of the fur trade in the southwest and covers New Mexico, Arizona, eastern Utah, and southern Colorado. A must read if you are interested in the fur trade. com User, March 12, 2008. The notes are awesome!!

In this comprehensive history, David J.

Webber, David J. Published by Norman, 1971. Publication Date: 1971. Book Condition: Good. Condition: Good Hardcover. From T A Swinford, Bookseller (Sun city west, AZ, . Visit Seller's Storefront. Terms of Sale: Cwo, defered billing to known dealers, reciprocal discount.

This Southwest trade in soft furs is the focus of this work. 2 As cited in David J. Weber, The Taos Trappers: The Fur Trade in the Far Southwest, 1540-1846 (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1982), 15. 3 Ibid. Foreigners saw the value in trading furs in the Southwest while it was under the control. 4 It is important to note that the term Southwest emerged after the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo of 1848 as a reference to the southwestern part of the United States.

David Weber was the oldest child of Theodore Carl Weber and Frances Jean; he had two younger brothers . Weber earned a master's degree in 1964 and a doctorate in 1967, with the dissertation The Taos Trappers: The Fur Trade in the Far Southwest, 1540-1846.

David Weber was the oldest child of Theodore Carl Weber and Frances Jean; he had two younger brothers and a sister. He was born on December 20, 1940, in Buffalo, New York and raised in nearby Cheektowaga. After several years of Catholic school, Weber finished his education in local public schools. He graduated from Maryvale High School in 1958.

Book by David J Weber
Umdwyn
This book is an extraordinary trove of detailed, concise and extremely readable history from what is probably the least-known or appreciated era in the frontier West. Without this narrative, most of what we think we know of the pioneer era is weak, thin or outright wrong. There were French traders and trappers in the Rockies a century before the Louisiana Purchase, for example; Lewis and Clark's expedition came very late in the exploration of the West. The Taos Pueblo had a grandstand seat for the two centuries of exploration capped by the fur trade.
Zamo
a great book about the spanish fur traders, very informative and wonderful reading
would recommend to anyone who is interestered in the fur trade history
Jeb
Only 45 miles north of Santa Fe, New Mexico lays Taos, long a city of early Native American settlement. Today Taos is a primary destination for skiers from around the world but during the early 1800s it was an illicit trading entrepot and a smugglers paradise.

While under Spanish control very little was done to tap the fur wealth of the extended surrounding area. Some furs were traded but the annual trading caravans from Chihuahua north to Santa Fe and back record little regarding the movement of fur. The French sought to connect with the Santa Fe - Taos area from New Orleans but were stymied by the Comanche. In 1763 France lost New Orleans to Spain at the close of the French and Indian War and for the next 40 years the Santa Fe-Taos area traded primarily with the Comanche (thus the term Comancheros) and sporadically with San Antonio. But with the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, Americans, primarily those of French descent out of St. Louis, started to filter into the area, settling primarily in Taos. By the time of Mexican Independence in 1824 there was a permanent French-American community from St. Louis, over 100 trappers, in Taos itself.

Taos was an open city and held a strategically important location with respect to St. Louis and the nearby Santa Fe Trail. Located in a secluded mountain valley, Taos was an illegal depositary for imports, avoiding the Mexican import duties levied in Santa Fe. The fur trading community at Taos required traps, weapons and other goods from St. Louis and stimulated much of the early trade that developed along the Santa Fe Trail. Moreover, as fur exports from Mexico were not taxed, many of the primary St. Louis trading houses who financed the Taos trappers received payment in fur. With margins often exceeding 500% the economic justification for the exploding fur trade was huge. Originating primarily from Taos, trapping brigades often totaling 80-100 men moved freely into the Salt River area west of today's Phoenix, Arizona, northern Utah, past today's Salt Lake City, and along the front range of the Rocky Mountains, past Denver into today's Wyoming.

By 1826 Taos men had pushed west to California where beaver was sold to American sea captains for transshipment east. William Wolfskill's treck to California is best known for inaugurating the route that become known as the Old Spanish Trail, a trace both Wolfskill and the Spanish learned about from the Indians. The profits earned in California were reinvested in mules and horses and driven back to Taos for sale. In 1831 trapper David Jackson of Jackson Hole Wyoming fame, drove his 700 California mules and horses all the way to Kentucky. Thus a remarkable transcontinental trading business headquartered in Taos flourished along the northern Mexican frontier long before the 1846 US War with Mexico.

Taos trappers reached their zenith in the early 1830s when silk replaced beaver fur in men's Eastern fashions. While many of these individuals really never amounted to much after the demise of the fur trade, many, far too many went on to absolutely remarkable careers in ranching, government, mining, exploration and military service. Kit Carson, Charles Beaubian, Tom Fitzpatrick, Ceran St. Vrain, George and William Bent, Bill Williams, James Clyman, Maurice LeDuc, Lucian Maxwell, Etienne Provost, and Antoine Robidoux all were involved. Becoming Mexican citizens and proving adept at local politics, many former trappers entered government, acquired huge tracts of grant land and set up virtual empires adjacent to the north and east of Taos.

David Weber has written a very detailed work on the Taos trapper. It was a fascinating period of gradual admission that Mexico's government could not control a territory that was inexorably pre conquered by men whose allegiance remained with the United States. With the declaration of war in 1846 trappers that had settled throughout New Mexico, California and as far north as Oregon would provide a reliable 5th column containing many knowledgeable guides to the United States Army for the conquest of what would become the American Southwest.
Mr.Savik
great book
Rrinel
Taos, New Mexico lies up the road from me, a little over an hour's drive. I have a soft spot for the town, but that is not the reason why I bought this book or give it four stars. THE TAOS TRAPPERS is more than one of those regional histories written by an enthusiastic amateur historian. It is a thoroughly professional history of a major quadrant of the fur trade and, hence, a chapter in the story of the European-American opening of the West.

The role of the Santa Fe Trail in the "opening" of the West is well known. But not Taos. In fact, as David Weber notes, during the 1820's, "the tiny village of Taos in northern New Mexico became the most important permanent market and supply depot for trappers between Fort Vancouver on the Pacific and St. Louis on the Mississippi."

Weber first sets the stage with a brief history of the fur trade under Spain, going back to 1540, and of Taos, which began to be settled by Anglo-Americans around 1820. At first, Taos was an adjunct of sorts to trade along the Santa Fe Trail, but as the trapping of beaver exploded in commercial significance and expanded geographically, Taos became an important center in its own right, in fact the most important market for furs taken in the southern Rockies. Its "golden era" was 1828 to 1833.

THE TAOS TRAPPERS contains a wealth of stories about the adventure, the dangers, and the economics of the fur trade, as well as the sporadic attempts of Spain and then Mexico to regulate it within the uncertain borders of New Mexico. Many of those stories involve in one way or another the stratagems of the trappers and traders to circumvent governmental licensing, duties, and taxes (by, for example, caching pelts before returning to Taos from a trapping expedition and then surreptitiously smuggling them into Taos or exchanging them with a merchant or trader). Notable and colorful trappers and traders populate the pages of the book, including Kit Carson, Sylvestre Pratte, √Čtienne Provost, the brothers Robidoux, Peg-leg Smith, Ceran St. Vrain, Milton Sublette, and Ewing Young.

But be forewarned, THE TAOS TRAPPERS is not written in the vein of popular history; it is not a particularly easy read nor is it a flowing historical narrative. Weber has scoured a mass of obscure original sources, and he has synthesized and summarized a lot of detailed information. He has done a fine job of it, but at times the presentation is on the dry side. On balance, however, THE TAOS TRAPPERS contains a very good, relatively concise and historically responsible presentation of its subject, one that duly recognizes the various economic, geographical, and political factors that impinged upon it.
Swift Summer
This book is the definitive book on the Taos are fur trade.....Sante Fe trail....Bent's Fort...Etc....It is VERY well researched and documented...The notes are awesome!! I have a couple other David Weber books and I really like his writing style...If you want to read ONE book on the Taos fur trade this is it...If you want to know about the fur trade as a WHOLE then there are better books out there....
Akirg
love it
Vancouver, Taos and St. Louis were the economic centers of the fur trade in western North America. This is the classic study of the fur trade in the southwest and covers New Mexico, Arizona, eastern Utah, and southern Colorado. A must read if you are interested in the fur trade.
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