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Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching ePub download

by Michael Greger

  • Author: Michael Greger
  • ISBN: 1590560981
  • ISBN13: 978-1590560983
  • ePub: 1339 kb | FB2: 1451 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Medicine
  • Publisher: Lantern Books; 1 edition (November 15, 2006)
  • Pages: 416
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 947
  • Format: lrf rtf txt mbr
Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching ePub download

Michael Greger's book, "Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching," explores H5N1 (the current strain of the virus that has generated so much concern)-from its origins, to its transmission, to its potential lethality, to how we might work to minimize the death and destruction that a pandemic.

Michael Greger's book, "Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching," explores H5N1 (the current strain of the virus that has generated so much concern)-from its origins, to its transmission, to its potential lethality, to how we might work to minimize the death and destruction that a pandemic might cause. He begins by discussing the 1918 pandemic (sometimes referred to as Spanish Flu), from its origins as a relatively mild flu bug to its emergence as a mass killer. This serves as a starting point for considering H5N1

Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching (2007)

Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching (2007). How Not To Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease (Hardcover) (2015) (with Gene Stone).

hatching" of this disease threat in his book, Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching (NYC: Lantern Books; 2006).

Throughout the entire book, Doctor Michael Greger examines influenza viruses and what makes them into such killers by meticulously weaving together historical, medical, ecological, agricultural, viral, and economic factors that contributed to the "hatching" of this disease threat in his book, Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching (NYC: Lantern Books; 2006)

Michael Greger's book, "Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own H5N1 Throughout the entire book, Doctor Michael Greger examines influenza viruses and what makes them into such killers by meticulously weaving together historical.

Michael Greger's book, "Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own H5N1. Throughout the entire book, Doctor Michael Greger examines influenza viruses and what makes them into such killers by meticulously weaving together historical, medical, Have you wondered what the big commotion is regarding bird flu? Are you still confused about how avian influenza came to be and why epidemiologists are so afraid of it?

paredness, Michael Greger’s book Bird flu: a virus of our own hatching presents not only . The bird flu rampaging across Asia will mutate into a deadly virus according to experts. To defeat this killer, a vaccine is being made in British and American laboratories.

paredness, Michael Greger’s book Bird flu: a virus of our own hatching presents not only a. comprehensive and thorough summary of. the continuing threat of H5N1 influenza. It is observed that every year 10 to 20 percent of the world's population gets flu and as the virus's two surface proteins are undergoing mutations, getting vaccinated or catching flu one year does not stop catching it next.

Michael Greger's book, "Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching," explores H5N1 (the current strain. Dr Greger must be aware of this, as he cites every single source that his information comes from with painstaking detail. The final 1/3 of this book contains all of the references, mainly from scientists and government who probably have some idea of what they are talking about.

In Bird Flu, Dr. Michael Greger traces the human role in the evolution of this virus, whose humble beginnings belie its transformation . The influenza virus has existed for millions of years as an innocuous intestinal virus of wild ducks. What turned a harmless waterborne duck virus into a killer?

In Bird Flu, Dr. Michael Greger traces the human role in the evolution of this virus, whose humble beginnings belie its transformation into a killer mutant strain with the potential to become as ferocious as Ebola and as contagious as the common cold. In the face of the coming pandemic, Dr. Greger reveals what we can do to protect our families and what human society to can do to reduce the likelihood of such catastrophes in the future. What turned a harmless waterborne duck virus into a killer?

New York, New York, USA. 2006. ISBN: 978-1590560983 (hardcover). At this critical time in the development of pandemic influenza preparedness, Michael Greger’s book Bird flu: a virus of our own hatching presents not only a comprehensive and thorough summary of the continuing threat of H5N1 influenza but a critical examination of the initial political and public health efforts that have been developed in response to the spread of. human cases of H5N1 infection across Asia, Europe, and Africa. The real strength of Bird flu lies in its comprehensive summary of the H5N1 outbreak.

Click here to watch a video of the book. From age-old scourges such as smallpox and tuberculosis to emerging threats like AIDS and SARS, our interactions with animals have always played a pivotal role as a source of human disease. Bird flu is the latest such menace coming home to roost. Leading public health authorities now predict as inevitable a pandemic of influenza, triggered by bird flu and expected to lead to millions of deaths around the globe. The influenza virus has existed for millions of years as an innocuous intestinal virus of wild ducks. What turned a harmless waterborne duck virus into a killer? In Bird Flu, Dr. Michael Greger traces the human role in the evolution of this virus, whose humble beginnings belie its transformation into a killer mutant strain with the potential to become as ferocious as Ebola and as contagious as the common cold. In the face of the coming pandemic, Dr. Greger reveals what we can do to protect our families and what human society to can do to reduce the likelihood of such catastrophes in the future. Amid the growing panic surrounding this issue, Dr. Greger takes a sobering look at a deadly cycle and offers a solution to ending it.
Saberblade
H5N1. Pandemic or fizzle? Will this version of Avian Flu be a killer as bad as the great Pandemic Flu of 1918 (also an avian flu)? Or worse? Or a fizzle like Swine Flu in President Gerald Ford's administration? If it is akin to the first two choices, Americans will be faced with one of the worst health threats in its history.

Michael Greger's book, "Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching," explores H5N1 (the current strain of the virus that has generated so much concern)--from its origins, to its transmission, to its potential lethality, to how we might work to minimize the death and destruction that a pandemic might cause.

He begins by discussing the 1918 pandemic (sometimes referred to as Spanish Flu), from its origins as a relatively mild flu bug to its emergence as a mass killer. This serves as a starting point for considering H5N1. It also allows him to discuss the origins of a number of major diseases. One thing to note: influenza in its various forms began as a bird flu.

A couple basic statistics to orient one. The 1918 pandemic killed about 5% of those exposed to the virus (in an interesting tidbit, Greger notes that we have rediscovered the 1918 virus and, through modern genetic technology, have supplies of it in labs. It is also sobering to note that when the rediscovered 1918 bug was injected into mice, most were dead in a short period of time. So we have a very lethal strain from 1918 to study). Thus far, of the 200+ known victims of H5N1, almost 50% have died. If the H5N1 strain does not lose its killing power (and it may, since some lethal strains become less lethal with time), this suggests a destructive potential that is almost unimaginable.

And, if the author is correct, humans have done this to themselves. Mass chicken farms are havens for the rapid spread of H5N1. Also, the virus has been shown to infect pigs. This is bad news, since pigs can also be infected by human viruses. If bird flu and a human virus interact, pigs might provide the breeding ground for a lethal strain of H5N1 that can be easily transmitted from pigs to people and then from person to person. One plus at the present is that H5N1 does not pass from one human to another easily.

What to do about the threat? First, address how chickens and other commercial birds are raised. The vast farms where they are now raised are seedbeds of mass infection by H5N1. Prevention of the emergence of a virulent virus that can be transmitted from human to human is a priority for the author. He says (page 347): "To reduce the emergence of viruses like H5N1, humanity must shift toward raising poultry in smaller flocks, under less stressful, less crowded, and more hygienic conditions, with outdoor access, no use of human antivirals. . . ." Next, work hard to develop vaccines against the virus. This may be difficult, given that we are not sure of what form the virus will take and the slowness of development of a new vaccine. Third, try to develop larger stockpiles of Tamiflu. If the author is correct, the United States is stunningly slow in this effort. Fourth, as bland as it sounds, wash hands regularly! Engage in some degree of "social distancing," not being around large gatherings of people if the flu strikes. Fifth, prepare at home. Stow away nonperishable items in the event that one must try to ride things out. Several weeks of food and water would be needed. The chapter provides a useful check list of items to store in the event of pandemic.

In the final analysis, this is a sobering book. To the extent that the author's analysis is correct, we ought to be taking action now. Certainly, communities ought to be planning for what happens if the pandemic actually occurs. The same with health care organizations. If 30-40% of workers are ill, there will be a breakdown in services all over, and there has to be some planning for such an eventuality. This book probably should be widely read. While, sometimes, I suspect that it might be a little on the "over the top," pessimistic side, I also believe that we can't just sit back and say, "It'll be a fizzle and I don't need to worry." "Don't worry, be happy" is not good preparation for what could be a deadly pandemic.
Voodoolkree
This book has been around a long time now, but it's so worth reading! It's so well researched and documented that most of the information has no time-stamp on it.
The beginning was a bit scary to get through, as the information, for me, felt a tad overwhelming, but it was so worth toughing it out to get the entire experience. I've recommended it to many people who have been grateful for the information and preparedness it provides for individuals, and the public as a whole.
Fasten your seat belts, it's going to be a bumpy ride.
Marelyne
Read this a while ago and still remember quite a bit of it - its that eye opening with regard to our food sources. Makes you think about where your food (meat especially) comes from and also gives you alot of background on viruses in terms ordinary people can understand. Its good but after you read it be prepared to give that raw chicken a second look before you buy it.
Sudert
Watching a pandemic unfold and take shape before your eyes is like watching paint dry. It is an agonizing process, slow and painful. But at the end, the product is there for all to see.

This is the book to read while watching the paint dry. Like Mike Davis' excellent "The Monster at Our Door," Dr. Greger has done a lot of the heavy lifting for you. He has read countless books, scientific papers, newspaper and magazine articles along with medical/scientific journals and produced the definitive work on avian influenza for the lay reader, decision-maker and concerned citizen.

Along the way, Dr. Greger also shows us the principal underlying cause of the spread of H5N1 (factory farming of chickens and other poultry) and supports his theories with mountains of data, opinion and observation -- much of it directly from the commercial poultry industry he takes to task for putting the world in the shape it is in, bird flu-wise.

Certain passages contain the most relevatory things about food production I have read since Upton Sinclair. It would not take much more to turn me into a vegetarian! I now seek free-range chickens to consume.

Speaking of consume: Once you have read (in order) The Great Influenza (Barry), The Monster at Our Door (Davis) and Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own hatching (Greger), you are ready to dive into the scientific literature yourself. Have a go at all three of these excellent books.
Gaiauaco
Written before the 2015 H5N2 poultry epidemic, which is still ongoing, adding credibility to many of his points. It is almost irresponsible not to read this book if you live in a poultry state, or breath air.
Wenyost
I read this book in one sitting. The book is well researched, carefully detailing how to protect ourselves in the likely event of an H5N1 bird flu pandemic. The World Health Organization has determined bird flu to be the number one threat humans currently face (above nuclear attack). I'm relieved to have the life saving supplies on hand. I highly recommend this book.
Xtintisha
Great book; easy to read and understand!
Very well written. This book did not disappoint me even with such a high rating. If you are interested in virus evolution or interactions between viruses and their hosts or perhaps the impending approach of a bird flu Armageddon, then I highly recommend this.
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