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The Shape of the Heart: A Contribution to the Iconology of the Heart ePub download

by P. J. Vinken

  • Author: P. J. Vinken
  • ISBN: 0444829873
  • ISBN13: 978-0444829870
  • ePub: 1901 kb | FB2: 1475 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Medicine
  • Publisher: Elsevier; 1 edition (November 24, 1999)
  • Pages: 206
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 560
  • Format: mobi lrf txt docx
The Shape of the Heart: A Contribution to the Iconology of the Heart ePub download

Vinken presents interesting arguments but I found "The Shape of the Heart" incredibly difficult to read.

Vinken presents interesting arguments but I found "The Shape of the Heart" incredibly difficult to read. The text employs a tremendous amount of passive voice- a personal pet peeve but one that obscures his larger point. He often doesn't explain who presented a particular interpretation, leading a reader to dig through lots of footnotes

Book Overview Since the days of the ancient Greeks, anatomists have correctly reported that the heart is shaped like a pine cone.

The most widely recognised icon in the world is the human heart, as depicted, for example, on playing cards. But a heart has neither a dent nor fold in its base, it is not 'nipped in the waist' and it does not have a sharp point on its underside.

A Contribution to the Iconology of the Heart. Published October 1, 1999 by Elsevier.

In the Shape of a Heart" is a song written and performed by American singer-songwriter Jackson Browne included on his 1986 album, Lives in the Balance. Released as the second single from the album, it reached on Billboard's Hot 100 chart, spending seven weeks on that chart after debuting at but was a big Adult Contemporary hit, peaking at It was also released as a single in the United Kingdom and Japan, and as a promotional 12" in Germany

Today, the heart shape is the universal symbol of romantic love Vinken and Kemp believed that the heart shape was created during the Middle Ages by scientists who tried to visualize ancient texts

Today, the heart shape is the universal symbol of romantic love. It can be seen all around us, but mostly as a heart emoticon on social networks. People send millions of digital hearts over the web every day to express their adoration to someone, or to something. Vinken and Kemp believed that the heart shape was created during the Middle Ages by scientists who tried to visualize ancient texts. For example, Guido da Vigevano, a 14th-century Italian physicist, made some anatomical drawings of a heart that are very similar to the descriptions made by Aristotle.

While the silphium theory is compelling, the true origins of the heart shape may be more straightforward

While the silphium theory is compelling, the true origins of the heart shape may be more straightforward. Scholars such as Pierre Vinken and Martin Kemp have argued that the symbol has its roots in the writings of Galen and the philosopher Aristotle, who described the human heart as having three chambers with a small dent in the middle. According to this theory, the heart shape may have been born when artists and scientists from the Middle Ages attempted to draw representations of ancient medical texts.

The final transformation of the green heart-shaped leaf into the red playing-card heart took place in medieval writings, predominantly in the central-european literature of courtly love

The final transformation of the green heart-shaped leaf into the red playing-card heart took place in medieval writings, predominantly in the central-european literature of courtly love. During the Middle Ages and early modern times, when medicine had a scholastic character, this symbol was used even by anatomists to portray the heart. The worldwide circulation of the heart symbol through art, playing-cards and above all, however, through religious worship, has made the heart, besides the cross, to the probably most popular non-geometric symbol and to cardiology's emblem.

The function of the right side of the heart (to be) to collect deoxygenated blood, in the right atrium, from the body and pump it, via the right ventricle, into the lungs (pulmonary circulation) so that carbon dioxide.

The function of the right side of the heart (to be) to collect deoxygenated blood, in the right atrium, from the body and pump it, via the right ventricle, into the lungs (pulmonary circulation) so that carbon dioxide can (to drop) off and oxygen (to pick) up (gas exchange). However, the reference range (to be) normally between 60 bpm (if less it (to term) bradycardia) and 100 bpm (if greater, it (to term) tachycardia). The infant/neonatal rate of heartbeat (to be) around 130-150 bpm, the toddler's about 100–130 bpm, the older child's about 90–110 bpm, and the adolescent's about 80–100 bpm.

The heart symbol is used in various expressions to indicate love or affection, sometimes with a connotation that the . P. J. Vinken (2000), The Shape of the Heart: A Contribution to the Iconology of the Heart (illustrated e., Elsevier Health Sciences, ISBN 9780444829870

The heart symbol is used in various expressions to indicate love or affection, sometimes with a connotation that the feeling is superficial or juvenile. It is a play upon Milton Glaser's classic I Love New York logo. it can be used to show that one has a crush on someone or is in love with someone., Elsevier Health Sciences, ISBN 9780444829870. Vinken, P (2001), "How the heart was held in medieval art", The Lancet 358 (9299): 2155–2157, doi:10. 1016/S0140-6736(01)07224-5, PMID 11784647.

This is without a doubt the best book in the Canadian West series.

Thousands of books are eligible, including current and former best sellers. Look for the Kindle MatchBook icon on print and Kindle book detail pages of qualifying books. This is without a doubt the best book in the Canadian West series. Elizabeth Thatcher is described by her mother as being a "sensible school teacher" in a letter to her brother, which she no doubt is. But, she is also funny, resourceful, kind, independent, inquisitive, observant and emotionally stable.

The most widely recognised icon in the world is the human heart, as depicted, for example, on playing cards. But a heart has neither a dent nor fold in its base, it is not 'nipped in the waist' and it does not have a sharp point on its underside. Since the days of the ancient Greeks, anatomists have correctly reported that the heart is shaped like a pine cone or has the outline of an upturned pyramid. Why is the shape of such a popular icon so at variance with the heart's true form? It seems that the indentation or fold in the base of the heart first appeared in Northern Italy in the early years of the fourteenth century. It was the result of an error originally made in an anatomical text by Aristotle. In the sixteenth century, anatomists finally corrected the error, but, by that time, the scalloped heart icon had become so established in the visual arts that it could no longer be changed. This work also contains a section devoted to a cave, shaped like the interior of the heart, in an allegorical print by Jan Saenredarn (1604). The representation was a creation of Hendrik Spiegel (1549-1612), one of the fathers of Dutch grammar and a friend of Cornelis Cornelisz, Hendrik Goltzius and Karel van Mander.