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Here Comes Mrs. Kugelman: A Novel ePub download

by Philip Boehm,Minka Pradelski

  • Author: Philip Boehm,Minka Pradelski
  • ISBN: 0805082123
  • ISBN13: 978-0805082128
  • ePub: 1227 kb | FB2: 1437 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: World Literature
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books (July 9, 2013)
  • Pages: 240
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 106
  • Format: lit mbr doc lrf
Here Comes Mrs. Kugelman: A Novel ePub download

Here Comes Mrs. Kugelman is Minka Pradelski's enchanting novel of listening and telling. After a knock at her hotel-room door, Tsippy opens it to find Bella Kugelman, an elderly woman who, despite her age and frailty, pushes her way into the room and refuses to leave

Here Comes Mrs. After a knock at her hotel-room door, Tsippy opens it to find Bella Kugelman, an elderly woman who, despite her age and frailty, pushes her way into the room and refuses to leave. Bella is desperate to tell Tsippy her life’s story. Bella speaks of her childhood, her early life in Poland, and, in particular, the bustling town of Bedzin. Through Bella’s stories, the streets of Bedzin come alive, and its inhabitants become familiar friends. Through the magic of Mrs. Kugelman’s storytelling, Tsippy’s world takes on new meaning.

Here Comes Mrs. Kugelman is an enjoyable, engrossing read. Pradelski’s depiction of Jewish life in pre-war Poland comes off as both highly imaginative and authentic. At times there’s even a magical quality to Mrs. Kugelman’s stories, as seen in tales like that of Golda, the staunch Communist revolutionary so rigid in her views that she eventually turns to stone in her prison cell, thus avoiding capture by the Nazis during the occupation

New York : Metropolitan Books, Henry Holt and Company. Her name is Bella Kugelman, and she is determined to talk.

New York : Metropolitan Books, Henry Holt and Company. inlibrary; printdisabled;.

by Minka Pradelski ; translated by Philip Boehm. Pradelski slowly reveals Tsippy as the narrative unfolds, but the eponymous Bella Kugelman arrives as a powerful, original character, a woman who witnessed all that disappeared beneath Nazi nihilism. As Tsippy arrives at her hotel, she finds Bella waiting, seeking someone to listen to the stories of the past, of the town of Bedzin and its passionate, vibrant people. Kugelman book. Here Comes Mrs. Kugelman is Minka Pradelski's enchanting novel of listening and telling, of the silence between Holocaust survivors and their children, and of the power of stories to mend broken bonds. Kugelman; A Novel. Ian McEwan on his novel Nutshell – books podcast: The award-winning novelist explains to a Guardian Live audience why he picked a foetus as narrator of his latest novel, Nutshell. Kugelman is Minka Pradelski's enchanting novel of listening and telling, of the silence between Holocaust survivors and their . Kugelman is Minka Pradelski's enchanting novel of listening and telling, of the silence between Holocaust survivors and their children, and . .He says it's a delightful novel that's a fascinating mix of comedy and pathos. Praise for Here Comes Mrs. Kugelman. Charming and persuasive. a fascinating mix of comedy and pathos. Alan Cheuse, NPR's All Things Considered.

Read "Here Comes Mrs. Kugelman A Novel" by Minka Pradelski .

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Boehm has translated over thirty novels and plays by German and Polish writers, including Herta Müller, Franz Kafka and Hanna Krall. Minka Pradelski: Here Comes Mrs. Peter Schneider: Couplings: A Novel. Peter Schneider: The German Comedy (co-translator: Leigh Hafrey). Rafik Schami: Damascus Nights.

Author Minka Pradelski, well versed in the psychological effects of the Holocaust (she’s the daughter of two survivors), begins her novel with urgency - but not the kind you’d expect from a book exploring the story of a tiny Polish village during the Second World War. Protagonist Tsippy Silberberg is a bit of a catastrophist, haunted by a sense of terrors past and strangely addicted to frozen vegetables. She’s en route to Tel Aviv to pick up an inheritance when her journey is interrupted by Bella Kugelman, a little old lady who’s desperate to speak to her.

Here Comes Mrs. Kugelman is Minka Pradelski's enchanting novel of listening and telling, of the silence between Holocaust survivors and their children, and of the power of stories to mend broken bonds

When feisty young Tsippy Silberberg of the curious eating habits receives word from Tel Aviv that a distant aunt has left her a mysterious inheritance―an incomplete fish service in a battered brown suitcase―she decides to break her rigid routine and go collect it in person. But before she is even able to settle into her hotel room, an odd old woman bangs on her door and invites herself in. Her name is Bella Kugelman, and she is determined to talk.

And talk she does, with wondrous effect. Soon the room is filled with people―residents of the Polish town of Bedzin before the war, who now live on, if only in Mrs. Kugelman's stories. Flirtatious girls and sly shopkeepers, rich industrialists and a family so poor that their necks are bent over from looking for coins―in tale after tale, a town magically returns to life, even as its grim future looms darkly. And under the thrall of Mrs. Kugelman's words, Tsippy finally pieces together her aunt's strange bequest, as well as her own place in the story unfolding before her.

Oso
When does the Holocaust pass completely into history? I suppose when the last survivor dies and the last person who has heard the last survivor tell his story dies. We're not in danger of that happening too soon, but it will happen.

In German author Minka Pradelski's first novel (translated from German by Philip Boehm), she writes about Tsippy Silberberg, who travels from Frankfurt to Tel Aviv to pick up an inheritance she has received from a dead Israeli relative. She's sort of an odd girl - Tsippy is - who has developed some very bizarre eating habits and is definitely more than a bit neurotic. Her parents are both Holocaust survivors who have moved to Germany from their native Poland. After Tsippy arrives in Tel Aviv, she is told by the front desk at the hotel she has reserved her room at that the room had just been given away to another Tsippy Silberberg. (How many can there be in the world?) She moves to a second hotel, where she encounters an old woman, Mrs Kugelman, who basically traps Tsippy in her room and tells her about her life back in a small Polish village before WW2. According to Mrs K, the village of Bedzin, located near the border of Silesia, was a wonderful place to live, filled with wonderful people. All of that came to an end, of course, when the Germans invaded Poland and most of the residents of Bedzin were either murdered or fled east into Russia. Some had left Bedzin for Palestine before the war; most did not.

Pradelski's book has more than a little "magical realism". It isn't totally "magical realism", because if it was, I wouldn't have finished it. I don't find it easy to suspend belief in the rational; I'm too much a literal reader. But Pradelski has produced two main characters - Mrs Kugelman and Tsippy Silberberg - who, along with the late residents of Bedzin and a few current residents of Tel Aviv - come together in an interesting way to produce a fascinating story of love, life, and the way the past most definitely influences the present and the future? Even though Tsippy's father back in Frankfurt had come from a different part of Poland, could he possibly have been a bit present in the events in Bedzin?

As with most book with "magical realism", this book can be read in two ways. One is the "plain", this is what happened to these people and the other is more as a fable. I think how much you enjoy the book depends on how you choose to read it. I think "Mrs Kugelman" will probably get a whole range of reviews. It's one of those books; books that make you think when you finally close it.
Darksinger
I didn't quite get it at the beginning. But learned later that
the message has to be continued & that it is easier to tell
strangers than those closest to you.
dermeco
Although it was well written and told a good story, I was annoyed by the unbelievable mechanism used to introduce the characters.
Beahelm
It was good but not stunning
Unh
Lovers of historical fiction presented in an unusual way should appreciate HERE COMES MRS. KUGELMAN, Minka Pradelski's unconventional account of the various inhabitants of the Polish town of Bedzin just prior to the start of WWII. Pradelski explores historical events and everyday happenings through the lens of Mrs. Kugelman who manages to bring life to those persons long dead through the stories she tells.

Mrs. Kugleman is a persistent historian not inclined to be dissuaded by the initially uncooperative and uninterested Tsippy Silberberg, a woman who has come Tel Aviv to collect a meager inheritance left by her distant aunt Helina. Slowly, as Mrs. Kugelman's story unfolds, Tsippy learns of the connection between Bedzin, her aunt Helina, her inheritance and the tenacious Mrs. Kugelman.

This unusual presentation of the Holocaust puts a very personal face on those who survived as well as going a long way in explaining their reticence in sharing their experiences with their children.

This book is translated from another language and the writing does not flow as it would if written by a individual whose native language is English. When I read Mrs. Kugleman's stories, it was akin to having an old Jewish woman sitting in my living room telling me about her life (complete with old country accent).
Weernis
The book gives a vivid sense of Europe in the late 1930's and thereafter and I was surprised the overall reviews were not better. It's a nice written book, with an interesting beginning. Note the other reviews have some spoilers as does the author's biography. Perhaps the toughest thing is that some of the subject matter is the holocaust.
Arakus
Unusual book but good. I nearly put it down early on but, fortunately, persisted. It was an interesting reflection by the major character who is carrying lots of her own baggage. She seems to find openings into understanding her own issues by hearing stories from this odd yet endearing holocaust survivor.
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