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In Search of Lost Time, Volume 5: The Captive, The Fugitive ePub download

by Marcel Proust

  • Author: Marcel Proust
  • ISBN: 0679424776
  • ISBN13: 978-0679424772
  • ePub: 1591 kb | FB2: 1673 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: World Literature
  • Publisher: Modern Library (May 18, 1993)
  • Pages: 976
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 818
  • Format: txt rtf lrf mbr
In Search of Lost Time, Volume 5: The Captive, The Fugitive ePub download

Marcel Proust was born in the Parisian suburb of Auteuil on July 10, 1871. The remaining volumes were published following Proust’s death on November 18, 1922: The Captive in 1923, The Fugitive in 1925, and Time Regained in 1927.

Marcel Proust was born in the Parisian suburb of Auteuil on July 10, 1871. His father, Adrien Proust, was a doctor celebrated for his work in epidemiology; his mother, Jeanne Weil, was a stockbroker’s daughter of Jewish descent. He lived as a child in the family home on Boulevard Malesherbes in Paris, but spent vacations with his aunt and uncle in the town of Illiers near Chartres, where the Prousts had lived for generations and which became the model for the Combray of his great novel.

Six thousand five hundred. present inhabitants of Spain, Palestine and Egypt the settings and the selfsame actors of the ancient scenes which they themselves had expounded in their books. Be it said without offence to that knight of noble lineage, Brichot declared to me in the carriage that was taking us home, he is quite simply prodigious when he illustrates his satanic catechism with a dash of Bedlamite verve and the obsessiveness, I was going to say the candour, of a blanc d’Espagne21 or an émigré.

As at the same time he attached enormous importance to his position in the diplomatic service, these deplorable sniggering exhibitions in the street were constantly interrupted . Other author's books: Letters to His Neighbor.

As at the same time he attached enormous importance to his position in the diplomatic service, these deplorable sniggering exhibitions in the street were constantly interrupted by sudden fits of terror at the simultaneous appearance of some society person or, worse still, of some civil servant. The Complete Short Stories of Marcel Proust. Time Regained & a Guide to Proust.

Indeed, the number of times I’ve been obliged to take up the cudgels on your behalf, to assure them that you wouldn’t play in some absurd drawing-room! .

Indeed, the number of times I’ve been obliged to take up the cudgels on your behalf, to assure them that you wouldn’t play in some absurd drawing-room! Do you know what the answer was: ‘But he’ll be forced to. Charlus won’t even consult him, he never asks him for his opinion.

From time to time, while we were waiting for these gowns to be finished, I used to borrow others of the kind, sometimes merely the stuffs, and would dress Albertine in them .

From time to time, while we were waiting for these gowns to be finished, I used to borrow others of the kind, sometimes merely the stuffs, and would dress Albertine in them, drape them over her; she walked about my room with the majesty of a Doge’s wife and the grace of a mannequin. But my captivity in Paris was made more burdensome to me by the sight of these garments which reminded me of Venice.

Albertine is both the captive and the fugitive. Far, far from Marcel’s first glimpse of her, along the beach at Balbec, in Volume 2, the Budding Grove. The unnamed narrator is finally actually named. If the reader begins to think that Proust’s observations are suitable for only the time and place of the Third Republic, he provides such up-to-date, plus ca change truths as: But society’s finished, there are no longer any rules, any proprieties, in conversation any more than in dress. Ah, my dear fellow, it’s the end of the world.

I don't usually bother with cyclic sagas, but in this case, a portion may be consumed without regard to the whole.

But since its original prewar translation there has been no completely new version in English.

But since its original prewar translation there has been no completely new version in English

It is considered to be his most prominent work, known both for its length.

It is considered to be his most prominent work, known both for its length and its theme of involuntary memory, the most famous example being the "episode of the madeleine" which occurs early in the first volume.

This translation brings to the fore a more sharply engaged, comic and lucid Proust

Since the original prewar translation there has been no completely new rendering of the French original into English. This translation brings to the fore a more sharply engaged, comic and lucid Proust.

1. Time is a central concern for Proust, appearing first in the title and last as the final word of the novel. What is his vision of the past? Does he have a vision of the present? The future? Can the Narrator be said to be living in the past? Is he like the White Queen in Through the Looking-Glass , with 'jam tomorrow and jam yesterday - but never jam today'? 2. The renowned translator of Proust, C. K. Scott Moncrieff, originally grouped the opening section of In Search of Lost Time under the title 'The Overture,' which includes two famous passages, the good night kiss and the evocative taste of the madeleine. Does this seem apt? If so, how might this fifty-odd page beginning prefigure what will transpire later? What would you expect to follow, given that an overture usually introduces the main themes of a musical work? What does it suggest about Proust's conception of literature and music? 3. The episode of the good night kiss strikes some readers as odd or contradictory: the Narrator's need for a kiss seems almost infantile, while his power of observation seems extraordinarily precocious. Considering that he is sent to bed at eight o'clock, how old do you think the Narrator is? Is it significant that his father suggests the Narrator be given the kiss he craves, whereas his mother is reluctant, saying 'We mustn't let the child get into the habit . . .'? Is the fact that the Narrator succeeds in getting the kiss he wants a good thing or a bad thing? Why? 4. 'The whole of Proust's world comes out of a teacup,' observed Samuel Beckett. Indeed the episode of the madeleine dipped in tea is the first (and most famous) of numerous instances of 'involuntary memory' in the novel. A recognized psychological phenomenon triggered by smells, tastes, or sounds, involuntary memory vividly reproduces emotions, sensations, or images from the past. Why do you think readers and critics universally consider this scene to be pivotal? What does the Narrator think about the experience of involuntary memory? What might its function be in the scheme of In Search of Lost Time ? 5. Another emblematic theme involves the recurring 'little phrase' of music by Vinteuil that catches the ear of Swann at the Verdurin's salon and steals into his life. How do Vinteuil's compositions stir both Swann and the Narrator? In Proust's scheme of things, is music a higher art than painting or writing because it can produce involuntary memories? How does involuntary memory affect writing and painting? Is it unrelated to art except as a necessary catalyst? 6. In 'Combray' we are introduced to the Narrator's family, their household, and their country home. Since Paris is the true heart of upper-class France, why do you think Proust chose to begin In Search of Lost Time elsewhere? What do we learn from the Narrator's description of his family's life and habits? Is the household dominated by men or by women? Does the Narrator's account seem accurate, or is it colored by his own ideas and preoccupations? 7. A madeleine dipped into a cup of tea first impelled Proust into the 'remembrance of things past.' Though Proust was a gourmet in his youth, in the final years of his life he subsisted mainly on fillets of sole, chicken, fried potatoes, ice cream, cakes, fruit, and iced beer. Consider how food and culinary happenings - from meals at the restaurant in the Grand Hotel in Balbec to dinners at La Raspelière and the Guermantes's in Paris - form an integral part of the work. 8. Swann's Way and the Guermantes Way are presented as mutually exclusive choices for promenades, with Swann's Way given primacy of place at the novel's outset. Where, metaphorically speaking, does Swann's Way seem to lead? What are the aesthetic signposts and milestones the Narrator points out? What does the landscape around Combray represent? 9. 'I want my work to be a sort of cathedral in literature,' Proust once said. In his description of the area around Combray - and in many other places in the novel - the Narrator describes churches, and particularly steeples. Indeed, Howard Moss cites the steeple as one of Proust's most important symbols. In religious architecture, the steeple represents man's aspiration toward God, and by inference toward Art, the Proustian religion. What else might it suggest? Does it have a counterpart in nature? 10. Proust and the Narrator share an appreciation of gardens and flowers - Proust himself was eager to visit Monet's celebrated garden - and in a sense, all Combray can be seen as a garden. What associations does this evoke? How does the Narrator respond to natural beauty? What do flowers mean to him? How do we know? 11. Proust's work is filled with 'doubling' - the most obvious being the identification of the author with a fictional self of the same name but with somewhat different characteristics. Is Swann a double of the Narrator? What qualities do they share? In what ways do they seem different? What is the importance of the fact that Swann is a Jew? 12. Louis Auchincloss questions the use of a fictional first person named 'Marcel,' who is but isn't Proust. Marcel claims that he is neither a snob nor a homosexual, yet he is obsessed with both. Would Proust have strengthened Marcel's viewpoint by making it that of the young social climber that he himself so clearly was? Did he enhance or detract from Marcel's credibility by casting him as one of the few heterosexuals in the book? Does it matter that Marcel regards 'inversion' as a dangerous vice? Did Proust? 13. 'Swann in Love' might be thought of as a dress rehearsal for the Narrator's own performance, and Swann's passion for Odette establishes a model for various other love relationships that appear later in the book. Proust believed that all emotions and behavior obey certain psychological laws. E. M. Forster maintained that 'Proust's general theory of human intercourse is that the fonder we are of people the less we understand them - the theory of the complete pessimist.' Do you agree? How does Swann's love affair reflect this? What conclusions does the Narrator draw from his perception of Swann's experience? In what way does this differ from Swann's own view? 14. The Balbec sequence of Within a Budding Grove gathers a group of the novel's principal characters, many for the first time: Robert de Saint-Loup, the Baron de Charlus, and Albertine, to name three of the most important. Others begin to emerge in their true significance, like Elstir the painter. Why do you think Proust chose to bring them together in Balbec? In what ways does Balbec echo or amplify Combray? Is the little 'society' of Balbec a preview in microcosm of Paris? 15. While writing In Search of Lost Time Proust often rummaged through his vast photographic collection of Belle Époque luminaries as a means of stimulating his memory. 'You could see that his thoughts were following a kind of underground track, as if he were organizing everything into images before putting them into words,' recalled his maid Céleste Albaret. Indeed, the Baron de Charlus, in Within a Budding Grove , speaks of the special importance of photographs in preserving an unsullied moment of time past, before it has been altered by the present. Discuss how Proust used photographs in the story - just as he exploited the technology of trains, cars, and airplanes - as symbols of passing time. 16. In his landmark essay on Proust, Edmund Wilson praises the broad Dickensian humor and extravagant satire that animate vast sections of In Search of Lost Time , yet he goes on to call it 'one of the gloomiest books ever written.' Can you reconcile Wilson's remarks? 17. Critic Barbara Bucknall maintains that 'no Proustian lover really cares at all for his beloved's feelings.' Is this true? Would the Narrator agree? Would the
Aria
I enjoyed this literary classic, a pseudo-autobiographical novel told in the stream-of-consciousness style, although it is a little slow-going at first. Proust seems to have been very likable and in life a polite and warm character, if a little eccentric, so I got this as a first introduction to his work, and found it entices one to get more. This volume contains parts five and six of a heptalogy, constituting what is officially the longest novel in the world: In Search of Lost Time. I don't usually bother with cyclic sagas, but in this case, a portion may be consumed without regard to the whole. You don’t need to have read the prior series in order to enjoy this installment.

Proust was a typical modernist, an artist made by his era. As such he is concerned with pushing aside the previous norms, disregarding the old certainties. In this way he revels in the new rejection of absolute truth, wallows in the new prevailing sense of disillusionment, an approach that includes elements I dislike, such as his atheism and preoccupation with homosexuality.

However what I find gripping is his excellent description of the intrigue, obsession, machinations, internal tortures, and dynamics of romantic relationships. He writes with tremendous emotional acuity, self-awareness, and insight into the processes of human feeling. This is what gives his work a timeless quality, makes it as relevant today as when it was penned two centuries ago. What does one do with the pain of pain of longing, the inability to ever fully know the other person? What would you do to satisfy the curiosity and unanswered questions associated with a lover who left? He goes down that road with a flair for eloquent internal monologue and potent self-reflection, in the attempt to capture the past and “that translucent alabaster of our memories of which we are incapable of conveying the colour which we alone can see”.
Zeks Horde
Almost three decades ago, in 1989, I rented my first French gite (often, then, an old farmhouse that had been renovated, to varying degrees, for tourists). Certainly, it was not the plan, but the gite happened to be 12 km from the now hyphenated town of Illiers-Combray. Hyphenated, in honor of Marcel Proust’s magnum opus, with the latter part being the name of the town in his novel, which was set, in part, in Illiers, where Proust’s childhood home was. My family and I went to tour the home (the children were ages 4 and 3). We were the only people on the tour, which was conducted in French. Saw his bed, where the very young Marcel waited longingly for his mother’s goodnight kiss; saw the dinner bell, that in later years would be stolen; and was given the map of “Swann’s way” to the Pré Catelin gardens. Before the tour commenced, the “guardian” of his memory asked if I had read his work. I confessed that I had not. She was still polite, but I received a look that I might not be quite worthy of such a tour. Hey, afterwards though, I made sure I always kissed those very youthful kids goodnight, and I am now confident that it will not be the entire three decades before I could look the “guardian” in the eye, and answer in the affirmative: All six volumes!

Albertine is both the “captive” and the “fugitive.” Far, far from Marcel’s first glimpse of her, along the beach at Balbec, in Volume 2, the “Budding Grove.” The unnamed narrator is finally actually named. Typical of Proust, in the conditional at first, before he ventures into the declarative. They have left the “Gomorrah” that is Balbec, and Albertine is living in Marcel’s home in Paris, but with a separate bedroom, which does little to mute the “tut-tutting.” The servant, Francoise, strongly disapproves. Marcel is obsessively jealous of Albertine, particularly concerned that she might be having relations with other women. He has her watched constantly. Marcel is considering marrying her, but recognizes he does not love her. His desire is enflamed only when he thinks he is losing her; if she declares her devotion to him, he loses interest. Hundreds of pages on this sad equivocation about human relations that Leonard Cohen summed up far more succinctly in his song, “Chelsea Hotel”: “…I never once heard you say, I need you, I don’t need you, I need you, I don’t need you, and all of that jivin’ around.”

Endless subordinate clauses are the signature Proust style, easily recognized by any reader who makes it through volume 5. There is at least a 100-pages on the “pecking order” for one event at the salon of Mme. Verdurin, including her underhanded efforts to split Charlie Morel from M. de Charles. Aside from the machinations of the “gratin” of French society, and his relationship with Albertine, there are also ruminations on a variety of other subjects, such as the nature of sleep, the labors of street vendors, and the yellow wall in Vermeer’s “View of Delft.” Proust mixes propriety, with Albertine’s slang “me faire casser,” which the translator leaves in French…hum… no doubt in the spirit of “if you will excuse my French.”

It is famously “Proust’s world,” which is a bit unmoored from historical accuracy. Woven throughout this work is the Dreyfus Affair, surely long finished when folks are flying in airplanes. Bergotte dies, and he serves as the model for Anatole France, who died in 1924, two years after Proust did. Surely the biggest omission is World War I, of which there is nary a hint – surely that event penetrated even the most cloistered of the salons of society ladies!

If the reader begins to think that Proust’s observations are suitable for only the time and place of the Third Republic, he provides such up-to-date, “plus ca change” truths as: “But society’s finished, there are no longer any rules, any proprieties, in conversation any more than in dress. Ah, my dear fellow, it’s the end of the world. Everyone has become so malicious. People vie with one another in speaking ill of their fellows. It’s appalling!”

And he balances the above cited slang of Albertine with a much more delicious description of that most beautiful of rituals: “I could see Albertine now, seated at her pianola, pink-faced beneath her dark hair; I could feel against my lips, which she would try to part, her tongue, her maternal, incomestible, nutritious, hallowed tongue, whose secret dewy flame, even when she merely ran it over the surface of my neck or my stomach, gave to those caresses of hers, superficial but somehow imparted by the inside of her flesh, externalized like a piece of material reversed to show its lining, as it were the mysterious sweetness of a penetration.”

And then there was the 12 km drive back to the former farmhouse of a French peasant which had been built so that the larger farm animals would sleep in the house so that the peasant’s family could benefit from their warmth. Like WW I, something else omitted from “Proust’s world,” yet he still deserves the full 5-stars just for that one description of the most beautiful of rituals, with that meaningful and delightful adverb, “merely.”
greed style
It looks like this volume of the newer translation won't ever be released in the US, so I switched to this older translation so I could finish reading the series. It's a challenging read, especially when it comes to sentence length. There are fewer notes for context than in the newer translations, so it's possible that you'll either be stopping to look things up more often or perhaps missing some of the context of the work. It's beautiful writing, I feel like I have only skimmed the surface of it in my first read.

A minor point: these older books aren't nearly as pleasure to physically read. The paper is thinner and the type is blurrier.
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